If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(ProPublica)   The IRS would like to do your taxes for you and let you just sign the form and file them for free. Shockingly there is a "Grass Roots" campaign to forbid them from doing this. Not Shockingly, it's being funded by the makers of TurboTax   (propublica.org) divider line 103
    More: Obvious, IRS, TurboTax, Intuit, Stephen Dorff, Shocking, tax preparation, tax returns  
•       •       •

1319 clicks; posted to Politics » on 15 Apr 2014 at 4:04 PM (27 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



103 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-04-15 02:34:56 PM  
Well I for one totally trust the IRS to file my taxes and not take advantage of me in any way.
 
2014-04-15 02:39:49 PM  
shockingly, fark dot com literally is reposting propaganda
 
2014-04-15 02:41:41 PM  
or shockingly, I am incapable of reading words and sentences
 
2014-04-15 02:44:30 PM  
I have no problem paying a tax professional to get approximately 10x what I pay back in tax refunds.
 
2014-04-15 02:46:32 PM  
Heh, I don't know why, but it reminds me of the "Get your Billion Back" by H&R Block. They say that Americans are missing out on $1 billion by doing their own taxes. Except there's about 50 million households that do their own taxes, so each one is missing out on an average of $20. Meanwhile H&R Block charges, on average, $200 to do taxes for you.
 
2014-04-15 02:47:59 PM  
Why would you pay for Turbo Tax when all you have to do to find a reputable, seasoned tax accountant is drive around until you see someone dressed like the Statue of Liberty, dancing on the sidewalk?
 
2014-04-15 02:56:55 PM  

Pocket Ninja: Why would you pay for Turbo Tax when all you have to do to find a reputable, seasoned tax accountant is drive around until you see someone dressed like the Statue of Liberty, dancing on the sidewalk?


Either we travel in the same circles, or Jackson Hewitt is a dick to minimum wage kids the country over.
 
2014-04-15 03:08:16 PM  
I'll still stick with a CPA, thanks.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2014-04-15 03:09:23 PM  
There are PR companies that specialize in AstroTurf campaigns.
 
2014-04-15 03:11:18 PM  

Pocket Ninja: Why would you pay for Turbo Tax when all you have to do to find a reputable, seasoned tax accountant is drive around until you see someone dressed like the Statue of Liberty, dancing on the sidewalk?


Because you hear that your income is low enough to E-file online for free in your state through Turbo Tax, and don't realize that to do so for free you have to use a link from website of the state department of taxation rather than going directly through TurboTax, and discover that if you've gone in the wrong way, and even if you go back to the state taxation website link, once you've started through the non-free link the Turbo Tax website insists on getting your credit card number and trying to charge you for filing?

(It can be straightened out... with two hours on the phone to TurboTax web support, plus an extra hour to find the correct phone number to call.)

Myself, I still prefer supporting the USPS by sending the form in snail-mail.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-04-15 03:14:48 PM  
I was just thinking about this today, not by coincidence. So many ways the government asks us to tell them things they already know. The W-2 and K-1 forms are already in the computer. The vehicle registration card the officer wants to see says on its face it is meaningless (the RMV computer is always right) but I can be fined if I don't show it. Insurers tell the state if I have RomneyCare, but I have to redundantly tell them that I do.

The IRS and state revenuers should send a notice of proposed tax and have people make corrections.
 
2014-04-15 03:35:51 PM  
I go to the guy Willie Nelson, Wesley Snipes and Nick Cage referred me to.
 
2014-04-15 03:39:06 PM  

Nabb1: I'll still stick with a CPA, thanks.


You would still be able to.
 
2014-04-15 04:05:40 PM  

unlikely: Well I for one totally trust the IRS to file my taxes and not take advantage of me in any way.


And you should be free to file a full return if you disagree with what the IRS sends you.
 
2014-04-15 04:07:26 PM  
Jesus... what does Turbotax cost, like $50?  It is worth it just to get a summary of changes in the tax code and fill all those boxes in for me.  Free would be better, but Turbotax is pretty efficient.
 
2014-04-15 04:07:30 PM  

Gecko Gingrich: Pocket Ninja: Why would you pay for Turbo Tax when all you have to do to find a reputable, seasoned tax accountant is drive around until you see someone dressed like the Statue of Liberty, dancing on the sidewalk?

Either we travel in the same circles, or Jackson Hewitt is a dick to minimum wage kids the country over.


The country over...see them all over Hawaii as well.
 
2014-04-15 04:11:49 PM  

karmaceutical: Jesus... what does Turbotax cost, like $50?  It is worth it just to get a summary of changes in the tax code and fill all those boxes in for me.  Free would be better, but Turbotax is pretty efficient.


But the govt is willing to do it for free.  With as good if not better results.

No one is looking to bar you from throwing away your money, but perhaps other people would rather spend that $50 on food or rent or video games.
 
2014-04-15 04:12:52 PM  

ArgusRun: karmaceutical: Jesus... what does Turbotax cost, like $50?  It is worth it just to get a summary of changes in the tax code and fill all those boxes in for me.  Free would be better, but Turbotax is pretty efficient.

But the govt is willing to do it for free.  With as good if not better results.

No one is looking to bar you from throwing away your money, but perhaps other people would rather spend that $50 on food or rent or video games.


As far as I know you can still file your taxes for free right now... if you can find a pen and a stamp.
 
2014-04-15 04:14:12 PM  

karmaceutical: Jesus... what does Turbotax cost, like $50?  It is worth it just to get a summary of changes in the tax code and fill all those boxes in for me.  Free would be better, but Turbotax is pretty efficient.


If you itemize, you can deduct the cost. In Virginia that brings it to roughly $35.
 
2014-04-15 04:14:33 PM  

Gone to Plaid: The country over...see them all over Hawaii as well.


Ugh. The other day I saw a guy here locally in the *pouring* rain. It was in the lower 50's, too.
 
2014-04-15 04:14:38 PM  

karmaceutical: Jesus... what does Turbotax cost, like $50?  It is worth it just to get a summary of changes in the tax code and fill all those boxes in for me.  Free would be better, but Turbotax is pretty efficient.


Thing is, the vast majority of people don't need all the little boxes full of exemptions. They simply don't apply. The IRS also already knows everything about what you earn, so why not just let them pre fill the form, let you make corrections (such as checking a little box or two), and send it back?

Saves everyone a vast amount of time and money. If you have complex returns and use a CPA, they'll still be able to give you a benefit, but it'll reduce their work and their costs to you. It would also pretty much entirely kill the market for stuff like turbo tax, which makes money off of people who don't have large enough amounts of money or complex enough returns to justify a CPA. In my mind, that's a good thing. Public good, easy way to make government more efficient, save consumers lots of money.

But you know, the people who make money off of tax prep don't want it to happen, and the people with money tend to have a little more power in the political process than the rest of us, public interest be damned.
 
2014-04-15 04:15:35 PM  
reminds me of a family i've been friends with for some time now, they are staunch conservatives and openly anti-Obama because reasons & such, just look at what Obama has done to California vicariously through Republican governors!

yeah, they are Trust Fundies and do seasonal work ... tax preparation work,  why yes they are anti tax morans.
 
2014-04-15 04:15:39 PM  
Can this be something that we all agree that any Congrescritter who doesn't support it should not be reelected in November?

// I know, those things don't exist.
 
2014-04-15 04:18:17 PM  

karmaceutical: ArgusRun: karmaceutical: Jesus... what does Turbotax cost, like $50?  It is worth it just to get a summary of changes in the tax code and fill all those boxes in for me.  Free would be better, but Turbotax is pretty efficient.

But the govt is willing to do it for free.  With as good if not better results.

No one is looking to bar you from throwing away your money, but perhaps other people would rather spend that $50 on food or rent or video games.

As far as I know you can still file your taxes for free right now... if you can find a pen and a stamp.


The IRS wants to make it even easier. You would be able to file your taxes faster than you would with turbotax or whatnot, it would be just as accurate, if not more, and would be entirely free. Oh, and it wouldn't increase the size of government or any of that other crap republicans whine about.

Technology allows the IRS to make filing taxes far easier. When you're going on about government efficiency and responsiveness, this is a perfect example of what the government can do. You know, if we let it.
 
2014-04-15 04:18:25 PM  
So it's tens of millions of people who would get rid of the hassle of filing a 1040EZ vs. a small group of lobbyists and some big corporations.

Yeah, it's never going to happen.
 
2014-04-15 04:18:50 PM  
For what it's worth, TurboTax is probably immune from Republicans trying to cut its budget to the bone.
 
2014-04-15 04:19:35 PM  

ZAZ: The vehicle registration card the officer wants to see says on its face it is meaningless (the RMV computer is always right) but I can be fined if I don't show it


really? in MA they don't even issue them anymore. they just pull your license plate info on the onboard computer
 
2014-04-15 04:19:56 PM  

unlikely: Well I for one totally trust the IRS to file my taxes and not take advantage of me in any way.


For most Americans, who the fark cares?  The majority of the populace does not have hugely complicated returns.
 
2014-04-15 04:20:35 PM  
This is a repeat from, at least and I think, every year in which I have prepared and filed my own taxes (since 2006).
 
2014-04-15 04:22:21 PM  

Pocket Ninja: Why would you pay for Turbo Tax when all you have to do to find a reputable, seasoned tax accountant is drive around until you see someone dressed like the Statue of Liberty, dancing on the sidewalk?


There's one of those on the way in my morning commute.

I used to feel so bad for her having to stand outside and wave to cars in 0 degree weather at 7am.
 
2014-04-15 04:22:36 PM  

Nabb1: I'll still stick with a CPA, thanks.


I have to stick with a CPA for the Corporations. We'd do our own 'personal' taxes, but since we have all of our corporate accounting done at the same small firm they do our personal taxes for free.
 
2014-04-15 04:23:39 PM  
Only about 30 percent of people itemized their deductions, so this would probably be beneficial for the poors.
 
2014-04-15 04:23:59 PM  

Dr Dreidel: This is a repeat from, at least and I think, every year in which I have prepared and filed my own taxes (since 2006).


In 2003 when I started doing my own taxes, I remember being surprised and asked to find out you couldn't just go to IRS.gov and do your taxes.  That was 11 years ago.
 
2014-04-15 04:25:17 PM  
I worked in the UK for years and it's how they do it there. Tax taken out of my wages by the company I work for, just like it is here, and at the end of the year I'd receive a refund (nice little bonus on Week 52).

No tearing out hair. No having to file for the city, and the state, and the national tax (their equivalent would be city / town / borough, county, national).

It's nice the IRS are thinking of joining the 20th century.
 
2014-04-15 04:28:24 PM  
Having actually RTFA, there does not appear to be any compelling reason to create a law forbidding the IRS to do this.

The IRS would be creating an online program, or perhaps a downloadable program, that would allow filers to plug in their tax-related data.  This would be identical to using any commercial tax program, with the added benefit that in theory it would always be up-to-date with tax changes, and would have the ability to directly input the data into the IRS tax system.

This would save the IRS (and taxpayers) a lot of money on data entry and error correction, and probably would incite more folks to stop filing by paper.

It's not as good as working with a professional tax preparer who can answer questions and tell you when you're doing something horribly stupid, but TurboTax doesn't do that either - both TT and the IRS program would have the same garbage-in-garbage-out error potential.

So Intuit / TT is seeking legislation that protects its income and prevents competition from a free government service.  Sorry, no.
 
2014-04-15 04:31:07 PM  
I always wondered why the IRS didn't do this.  The best thing I could think of was that the IRS doesn't want to tell you what you owe and become old-fashioned biblical-type tax collectors.  You tell the IRS what you owe and they fact-check.  Seems like a stretch.  Still, it was my only idea and I must see merit in it.
 
2014-04-15 04:31:54 PM  

odinsposse: So it's tens of millions of people who would get rid of the hassle of filing a 1040EZ vs. a small group of lobbyists and some big corporations.

Yeah, it's never going to happen.


Don't forget the segment of the populace that acts like being asked to pay taxes at all is like having a fishhook inserted in your urethra.
 
2014-04-15 04:33:53 PM  

El Pachuco: Having actually RTFA, there does not appear to be any compelling reason to create a law forbidding the IRS to do this.

The IRS would be creating an online program, or perhaps a downloadable program, that would allow filers to plug in their tax-related data.  This would be identical to using any commercial tax program, with the added benefit that in theory it would always be up-to-date with tax changes, and would have the ability to directly input the data into the IRS tax system.

This would save the IRS (and taxpayers) a lot of money on data entry and error correction, and probably would incite more folks to stop filing by paper.

It's not as good as working with a professional tax preparer who can answer questions and tell you when you're doing something horribly stupid, but TurboTax doesn't do that either - both TT and the IRS program would have the same garbage-in-garbage-out error potential.

So Intuit / TT is seeking legislation that protects its income and prevents competition from a free government service.  Sorry, no.


Actually, it's even simpler: The IRS would already fill in all of the relevant information (since they already have the vast majority of it), you just have to look it over and correct it, if necessary.
 
2014-04-15 04:34:18 PM  

Jackpot777: It's nice the IRS are thinking of joining the 20th century.


IRS has been wanting to do this for freaking years.  It's Congress that's been holding them back on this.
 
2014-04-15 04:35:13 PM  
BUT HELTHCARE.GOV WAS A HORIBLE FAILURE! THE GOVERMINT CANT MAKE A WEBCITE!
 
2014-04-15 04:35:30 PM  
This isn't new to TurboTax.  Pre-filed returns (the generic term for this concept) have been tossed around for decades.  Some countries in Europe and Asia already do it.  Historically, it has been opposed by conservatives because they want tax filing to be as complicated and awful as possible to use as a political football.  Obama in particular said pre-filed returns were a priority of his during the election but has been unable to get Congress to come through -- again primarily due to GOP opposition.  Intuit's contribution is only relatively recent.
 
2014-04-15 04:36:39 PM  

Here Comes Everybody: odinsposse: So it's tens of millions of people who would get rid of the hassle of filing a 1040EZ vs. a small group of lobbyists and some big corporations.

Yeah, it's never going to happen.

Don't forget the segment of the populace that acts like being asked to pay taxes at all is like having a fishhook inserted in your urethra.


i will never forget the most disturbing image i have ever seen in my life, it was in a bait & tackle store, behind the register. lets just say it involved a treble hook & a hand.
i have a severe fear of needles so it really stuck in my head.
and you have just awoken the memory.
 
2014-04-15 04:41:57 PM  
When I first started paying taxes in the 1970s it was all about buying a JK Lasser book.
 
2014-04-15 04:43:44 PM  

BMFPitt: Can this be something that we all agree that any Congrescritter who doesn't support it should not be reelected in November?

// I know, those things don't exist.


There isn't one single thing the government could do in any area that everyone could agree on.

Quite literally, "you can please all of the people some of the time" does not apply to the government.

That would be nice though.
 
2014-04-15 04:45:42 PM  
THE  IRS


not yours
 
2014-04-15 04:50:56 PM  

cptjeff: The IRS wants to make it even easier. You would be able to file your taxes faster than you would with turbotax or whatnot, it would be just as accurate, if not more, and would be entirely free. Oh, and it wouldn't increase the size of government or any of that other crap republicans whine about.


Best part is....

If you agree to what the IRS sends you, it likely would reduce your audit risk to 0.
 
2014-04-15 04:55:02 PM  

cptjeff: Technology allows the IRS to make filing taxes far easier. When you're going on about government efficiency and responsiveness, this is a perfect example of what the government can do. You know, if we let it.


You seem to misunderstand.

Saying that the "government is inefficient" doesn't mean that it should become more efficient.  It means that it should cease to exist.
 
2014-04-15 04:56:02 PM  
So the IRS are the good guys right?
d75822.medialib.glogster.com
 
2014-04-15 04:56:11 PM  

odinsposse: So it's tens of millions of people who would get rid of the hassle of filing a 1040EZ vs. a small group of lobbyists and some big corporations.

Yeah, it's never going to happen.


If you are poor enough to be able to file an 1040EZ, you are too poor to matter.
 
2014-04-15 04:56:55 PM  
I will never understand the people who instinctively distrust government employees, but willingly hand over the EXACT same information and responsibility to corporations without batting an eye or thinking twice.
 
Displayed 50 of 103 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report