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(The Atlantic)   "Why do people willingly work in cubicles when the fabric boxes make them so miserable?" Well, probably because it was a better option than running a Walmart cash register   (theatlantic.com) divider line 29
    More: Obvious, American Life, Americans, U.S. Steel, George Packer, division of labour, office space  
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5924 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Apr 2014 at 5:35 AM (19 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-04-15 01:23:52 AM
5 votes:
www3.familyoldphotos.com

I'm guessing people willingly work in cubicles because this sucked serious ass.
2014-04-15 06:45:11 AM
4 votes:
I enjoyed my days in a cubicle - the conversations over the walls were outrageous.  Until the day that a new hire was offended by our off-colored jokes. Amazing how one person can suck the life out of an already crappy job.
2014-04-15 12:19:22 AM
4 votes:
You see this relationship between power and design throughout the history of the office: in the early clerical offices (think Bartleby, the Scrivener or Scrooge's office in A Christmas Carol)

I would prefer not to.
2014-04-15 07:10:17 AM
3 votes:

untaken_name: Because they pay me to. I certainly wouldn't do it for free.


This. I like my job, more or less, but people look at me weird when I say that the only reason I go is because they pay me. Yes, my sole motivation for work is money. Not getting rich, mind you, but money. As if almost everyone doesn't feel the same, deep down.
2014-04-15 06:47:43 AM
3 votes:
blog.codinghorror.com
2014-04-15 03:14:55 AM
3 votes:
when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.
2014-04-15 07:34:39 AM
2 votes:
Because having walls, despite them being thin and short, gives you at least some small measure of privacy.  It's hard to spend even a few minutes on Fark or whatever when everyone in the room can see your screen at any moment.  And it's hard to concentrate on your own work when you can see what everyone else in the room is doing.  And let's face it - private offices are becoming increasingly scarce in large companies that simply can't afford that much empty space.

My team is hiring so many people these days we're bursting at the seams already.  Even the high-level managers have cubicles, and what few offices there are have been largely repurposed into conference rooms.
2014-04-15 06:47:19 AM
2 votes:

some_beer_drinker: when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.


When will you shepherd us to the killing fields?  When will you slit the throats of some of the moneyed to incite our murderous frenzy?   It is spring, and grass grows thickest when fed by blood choking with cholesterol.
2014-04-15 06:07:58 AM
2 votes:

BumpInTheNight: Relatively Obscure: [www3.familyoldphotos.com image 500x324]

I'm guessing people willingly work in cubicles because this sucked serious ass.

and yet some assholes managed to convince a lot of executive types that the next big thing is open concept, fark me its going to suck.


Depends on your coworkers.  I worked in an open environment back before it was cool.  It worked for our group because we could all see the gigantic status board and balance our workload amongst ourselves and have conversations about said workload without having to pop up like prairie dogs.  Of course, the company president often threatened to put up cubicle walls to reduce the chatter.  Even tho the chatter was work related and the purpose of the chatter was to ensure that projects were properly prioritized and handled efficiently.  Some people will make problems if they can't find any.

Basically, if your coworkers suck, any configuration will suck.  If your coworkers are great, a PHB will find a way to destroy your productivity.
2014-04-15 06:04:32 AM
2 votes:
zivil.evangelisch.de
Starting point for cubicles.
2014-04-15 05:52:33 AM
2 votes:

Relatively Obscure: [www3.familyoldphotos.com image 500x324]

I'm guessing people willingly work in cubicles because this sucked serious ass.


and yet some assholes managed to convince a lot of executive types that the next big thing is open concept, fark me its going to suck.
2014-04-15 04:07:46 PM
1 votes:
I prefer the bullpen style assuming the others around me are other engineers on my team as I think it helps promote collaboration and builds a sense of team. I don't really mind cubes either. Offices I found made people especially disconnected from their coworkers which can be bad during crunch time. I find it's a lot easier for people to snap at one another when they don't see them as people and teammates
2014-04-15 03:00:21 PM
1 votes:
Umm...yeah, cubicles don't make office workers unhappy. Going to a job 8-10 hours a day to bust your ass and being told not to expect raises, having your health care costs rise or even having health care completely dropped as a benefit, all while watching the company rake in record profits makes people unhappy. Why people stay for abuse is a mystery, but then I don't have a mortgage, kids, or any debt I could not pay off tomorrow.
2014-04-15 09:53:29 AM
1 votes:
OK, this was a great "office" to work from. The view from the Comerica Club in Phoenix...

lh4.googleusercontent.com
lh3.googleusercontent.com
lh5.googleusercontent.com
lh6.googleusercontent.com
lh6.googleusercontent.com
lh6.googleusercontent.com
lh3.googleusercontent.com
lh5.googleusercontent.com
lh6.googleusercontent.com
lh4.googleusercontent.com

Yeah, I'd rather have the space to do my thing, than be walled up in an office.
2014-04-15 09:36:09 AM
1 votes:
I like working in my cube because I find happiness in the fact that I am providing for my family. Also, I like nice things and they cost money. I have often thought of trying to start my own business and "be my own boss" but that usually requires even more hours in a week. I just shrug and figure other people must be geniuses to scoff at a life of working since they have figured life out without doing it. Enjoy huffing your own farts guys.
2014-04-15 09:32:38 AM
1 votes:
Don't worry about cubicles. You are losing them, too.

Welcome to 'benching'

corovan.com

More asses in less floor space. Thats all that matters.
2014-04-15 09:01:08 AM
1 votes:
Cube life is all about who you're commiserating working with. I've had the good fortune of some awesome coworkers at my current job, including this one for the past five years, directly behind me:

img.fark.net

/April Fool's prank on coworker by their sibling
//his reign will end in a couple weeks, sob
///but telecommuting is on the horizon
2014-04-15 08:26:23 AM
1 votes:

PainInTheASP: I work in a cube farm because I've worked in retail and construction.  Can't say I'd ever want to go back.

I get paid good money and it's a job I love.  I see no downside to this, except maybe the crop dusters.


Same here. Took my first office job at 45 and it is like being retired.
Of course, I can't afford retirement, but then again, my chances of being injured in an industrial accident went down about 99%.
2014-04-15 07:39:23 AM
1 votes:
Here is a picture of my leg and foot while working.
Office work, blarghhh.img.fark.net
2014-04-15 07:35:52 AM
1 votes:
I never thought I'd miss the 8x8 cube with the 7 foot high walls my first job at the company provided....until the next step "up"(?) the ladder where I had a 7x7 with 3.5 foot high walls in a more open environment on the other side of town.

Now I'm in my 10th year of fully remote work, with the door to my basement ten feet away and the fridge & TV close at hand.

/I hope I stay on this career path...I could never go back into a traditional office setting.
//Then I'd have to shower every day
///And stop farting every five minutes.
////And the porn.  The sweet, beautiful porn.
2014-04-15 07:07:04 AM
1 votes:
I currently work in an "open design" office.

I would rather have cubicle walls.

Our IT department (which consists of one guy) moved into the break room, which used to be a garage .  Our office is a converted used car lot, with many large windows which makes you feel like you are working in a fishbowl due to being next to a major road and very...very bright lights.  I keep requesting for parabolic shades on the lights but my requests go ignored, its like working outside in the sun, and I think it is giving me a headache.

I am trying to convince my work to move me in there with him because it is darker, quieter, and I am basically IT support (the link between the software and the IT department).
2014-04-15 07:06:23 AM
1 votes:
After almost 9 years in the industry, and over 6 at my current place, I finally got my own window office late last year... and I would not go back to the cubicles. I love my office. I love that I can close the door. I love having my own coat rack. I have four network jacks, including one directly to the outside. I have a 30 amp outlet if I need it.

Plus, my office is the only one on my floor, aside from the four corner offices, to not have inside windows. The other offices aren't aquariums - it's about 50% frosted glass, but you can still tell if someone is (quietly) railing the secretary on their desk.
2014-04-15 07:04:09 AM
1 votes:

DrPainMD: some_beer_drinker: when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.

And then what? The jobs that are done in cubicles will still need to be done.


That's a generous sentiment.
2014-04-15 06:46:45 AM
1 votes:
My company will be moving buildings in a couple of months. They did a survey a few years ago to find out what was important to us. Top of the list were private offices and windows.

So of course, the decision was made to move to a building with a few shared offices along the windowline, and interior, windowless private offices. And as an added bonus, the current 125-sq.-ft. offices we have become in the new building 75-sq.-ft. singles or 150-sq.-ft. shared. Also, on a completely unrelated note, did you know that a recent survey of American prisons showed that the average prisoner in solitary confinement has an 80-sq.-ft. cell?

Not living in a cube is nice, but a windowless 7.5'x10' pen isn't much of a step up.
2014-04-15 06:18:16 AM
1 votes:
Where I work, they're re-building all of the floors of the main building: bright, new cubicles for those who work in the office and an open-space area for remote workers who have to come in once or twice a week. I've used that open-space area. Essentially, it's a very long table with phone, electrical, and network connectivity every few feet along both sides of the table. Basically, remote workers come in with their laptops and plug in where they can stare at the person directly across from them. I assume this is what people are referring to as an open-space design.

I'll take my cubicle with it's three walls and ginormous monitor, thank you very much.

CSB:
Apparently, whoever designed the new office space didn't take into account that hard, flat surfaces reflect sound. My new cubicle is directly across from the break room, which has lots of cabinets with hard, flat, shiny surfaces. Nothing in that room absorbs sound in any way. Essentially, I'm sitting directly across from a loudspeaker. I'm sitting there one afternoon talking to a co-worker (she was facing me with her back to the break room) when someone else walked into the break room and farted. LOUDLY. It resonated. People have no awareness of their surroundings.
/CSB
GBB
2014-04-15 06:00:56 AM
1 votes:
Notabunny:I loved that we lowly grunts could stop, collaborate, and listen and overcome managerial obstacles to achieving company goals.

The only purpose for mid-level managers is to justify their own existence.
2014-04-15 05:55:52 AM
1 votes:

Notabunny: fta open-plan offices diminish very few of the problems associated with cubicle-ridden offices, and in some cases they augment them.

When I was a cube farmer, I enjoyed the fact that management was detached from daily operations and shuttered away behind doors. I loved that I could scratch, pick, and fart with relative anonymity. I loved that we lowly grunts could stop, collaborate, and listen and overcome managerial obstacles to achieving company goals. But now i go crop dusting about every 10 minutes because my ego and self aggrandizement are paramount.


This comment makes me miss the days when I taught composition and could reward clever writing.
2014-04-15 05:53:24 AM
1 votes:
..and they're all made out of ticky-tacky
and thy all look just the same,
2014-04-15 12:25:30 AM
1 votes:
fta open-plan offices diminish very few of the problems associated with cubicle-ridden offices, and in some cases they augment them.

When I was a cube farmer, I enjoyed the fact that management was detached from daily operations and shuttered away behind doors. I loved that I could scratch, pick, and fart with relative anonymity. I loved that we lowly grunts could stop, collaborate, and listen and overcome managerial obstacles to achieving company goals. But now i go crop dusting about every 10 minutes because my ego and self aggrandizement are paramount.
 
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