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(The Atlantic)   "Why do people willingly work in cubicles when the fabric boxes make them so miserable?" Well, probably because it was a better option than running a Walmart cash register   (theatlantic.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious, American Life, Americans, U.S. Steel, George Packer, division of labour, office space  
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5965 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Apr 2014 at 5:35 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-15 09:49:59 AM  
I worked in a cubicle for 30 years. It didn't bother me at all. NO, NOT AT ALL!  NO, NO, NOT AT ALL!
 
2014-04-15 09:50:13 AM  

BumpInTheNight: Relatively Obscure: [www3.familyoldphotos.com image 500x324]

I'm guessing people willingly work in cubicles because this sucked serious ass.

and yet some assholes managed to convince a lot of executive types that the next big thing is open concept, fark me its going to suck.


It does suck. Our management is all about fad things they read in magazines (our CIO personally went through both floors of IT measuring the pictures to makes ensure they were hanging at the "optimum" height to motivate people. We moved into a giant open floorplan where you can't have a normal conversation or talk to people on the phone because it's too damn loud.

I handle over half of our company's trade secrets. I now go home whenver I have to do work on those systems, because I'm not leaving that up on monitors anyone can see if they wander through. It's absolutely retarded.
 
2014-04-15 09:50:57 AM  
I've always worked in an open plan environment. I like it. The only time I've had to work in cubes has been on visits to the US, and I find it oppressive.

I'm not really that much of a fan of offices either. Overhearing other people's conversations about technical issues (and therefore being able to butt in when they're talking bullshiat) is vital.
 
2014-04-15 09:53:29 AM  
OK, this was a great "office" to work from. The view from the Comerica Club in Phoenix...

lh4.googleusercontent.com
lh3.googleusercontent.com
lh5.googleusercontent.com
lh6.googleusercontent.com
lh6.googleusercontent.com
lh6.googleusercontent.com
lh3.googleusercontent.com
lh5.googleusercontent.com
lh6.googleusercontent.com
lh4.googleusercontent.com

Yeah, I'd rather have the space to do my thing, than be walled up in an office.
 
2014-04-15 09:56:45 AM  
"Human beings weren't meant to sit in little cubicles, staring at computer screens all day."

If human beings were "meant" to do anything, they're meant to wander around, live shiatty lives, and die young.

It's a fair trade.
 
2014-04-15 09:56:47 AM  
I work for a large Fortune 500 company, and for what I do, the cube set up works well. It's good to hear what is going on so we can collaborate on things.  We are fortunate because we have a lot of great people.  The biggest complaint is the hosebeast who clears her throat 100 times a day. She sounds like a warthog, but I'll take that over dealing with the public.
 
2014-04-15 09:59:01 AM  

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: Sounds like the "IT department" doesn't like you and has the boss's ear.


Nah, IT loves me, because I lighten his work load whenever I can.  I just have so many damn jobs in this company they like to see me out in the "work area".

We are working on an application proposal for the company.  If that gets approved then I will hopefully be able to move out there with him.
 
2014-04-15 09:59:51 AM  
When I graduated from college and started my professional life 35 years ago there were no cubicals.  My first workplace was a virtual ocean of desks and drafting tables in a giant windowless room, surrounded by doorless individual offices for the higher-ups.  Workers were free to smoke cigarettes at their desks, and if they smoked so did you whether you wanted to or not.

Work got a whole lot better the day they moved us to a new building with individual cubicals and banned indoor smoking.  It's easy to complain about the dreary grey fabric walls when you don't remember the earlier alternative.  Of course we should all have mahogany panelled individual offices with euro-modern office furniture, a private bathroom and a window view, and good luck with that.
 
2014-04-15 10:01:03 AM  
I have a cube with a nice view of downtown Richmond across the James River and off the main foot traffic path.  I'm not micromanaged, the floor is quiet, and no one cares if I'm on the internet as long as I get my work done.  I don't love my job (or hate it for that matter) but I've worked way worse jobs--yes, including running a Walmart cash register.
 
2014-04-15 10:05:21 AM  

Lapdance: Umm, because you don't have a Choice?


This.

If you're a cubicle dweller, chances are someone who isn't has decided where you will sit and when, and you have very little to no say about it.
 
2014-04-15 10:05:38 AM  
Office cubes suck, but not real bad.  Kind of in the way that everything sucks except what you really want to be doing.  Happy give all your beer money to the government tax day.
 
2014-04-15 10:06:53 AM  

kqc7011: Here is a picture of my leg and foot while working.
Office work, blarghhh.[img.fark.net image 850x637]


Here's me climbing up to my office yesterday:
img.fark.net
 
2014-04-15 10:08:52 AM  

Last Man on Earth: Lapdance: Umm, because you don't have a Choice? Don't have those dividers but my computer desk and another table and credenza have been shoved into a windowless, what used to be a file storage room. That's just the way it is, no choice.

You could set the building on fire.


encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com

 
2014-04-15 10:09:43 AM  

pi8you: Cube life is all about who you're commiserating working with. I've had the good fortune of some awesome coworkers at my current job, including this one for the past five years, directly behind me:

[img.fark.net image 640x480]


That's...  That's...  Byoo-Ti-Full!!!


/I envy you
 
2014-04-15 10:10:49 AM  

Relatively Obscure: [www3.familyoldphotos.com image 500x324]

I'm guessing people willingly work in cubicles because this sucked serious ass.



A while ago I was briefly unemployed when my studio went under.  We were eventually bought out, and able to bring back most of our people, but for a month or two I was interviewing at various game dev houses, and got to see a lot of 'modern' workplace designs.  This picture looks almost exactly like how one big-name, AAA studio I'm not going to name keeps their engineers-a hundred plus or more prime neckbeards stuffed into a cavernous work hall, elbow to elbow, with everyone whispering and wearing headphones so they don't distract anyone else.  Meanwhile upstairs, there were huge open 'play' areas full of games that no one had time to play, couches that no one had time to lounge on, and break rooms for people who didn't have time to take breaks because they were working so much, because that's how game dev works.

The manager giving me the tour literally could not comprehend how I thought it was a waste of space.  'But people LIKE working in an open environment!  They all tell me that!'

I didn't bother scheduling a follow up interview.

Lucky for me, we ended up getting purchased by a big-name dev studio, and I got back to my office with windows and managers who aren't clueless morons.
 
2014-04-15 10:11:51 AM  

fusillade762: You see this relationship between power and design throughout the history of the office: in the early clerical offices (think Bartleby, the Scrivener or Scrooge's office in A Christmas Carol)

I would prefer not to.


Damn, not a single response?! I appreciate what you did there.
 
2014-04-15 10:28:08 AM  

Notabunny: fta open-plan offices diminish very few of the problems associated with cubicle-ridden offices, and in some cases they augment them.

When I was a cube farmer, I enjoyed the fact that management was detached from daily operations and shuttered away behind doors. I loved that I could scratch, pick, and fart with relative anonymity. I loved that we lowly grunts could stop, collaborate, and listen and overcome managerial obstacles to achieving company goals. But now i go crop dusting about every 10 minutes because my ego and self aggrandizement are paramount.


You know, it's okay to go to work and not have it be all about the farting every single day.
 
2014-04-15 10:28:35 AM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: My company will be moving buildings in a couple of months. They did a survey a few years ago to find out what was important to us. Top of the list were private offices and windows.

So of course, the decision was made to move to a building with a few shared offices along the windowline, and interior, windowless private offices. And as an added bonus, the current 125-sq.-ft. offices we have become in the new building 75-sq.-ft. singles or 150-sq.-ft. shared. Also, on a completely unrelated note, did you know that a recent survey of American prisons showed that the average prisoner in solitary confinement has an 80-sq.-ft. cell?

Not living in a cube is nice, but a windowless 7.5'x10' pen isn't much of a step up.



I used to work for a print production company that made yearbooks. Twelve hour shifts of scanning yearbook photos all day. Each production team was comprised of four or five people and we were all put together in a small cubicle  where conversation was discouraged and if production was slow and you didn't immediately have any work to do you were not allowed to leave your cubicle and the only thing they would allow to pass the time was to read the company training manuals. You were not allowed to bring in outside reading materials. Management called each production team a cell, and they referred to the members of the team, completely un-ironically, as cell mates.

/If I have to go back to an office job I might kill myself.
 
2014-04-15 10:28:43 AM  

LemSkroob: Don't worry about cubicles. You are losing them, too.

Welcome to 'benching'

[corovan.com image 661x272]

More asses in less floor space. Thats all that matters.


Yup, we are currently in the middle of a similar transition. We currently occupy 10 floors of our downtown office building but the parent company who owns out firm has some formula for how much space each worker should have in order to optimize their profits so we are going from private offices (I love mine) to these open work stations. So ultimately we're going from the 10 floors down to 4 in the name of some shareholder I've never met being able to make an extra 10 cents on his shares.
 
2014-04-15 10:31:23 AM  
To keep the farts in.

Curses to you, Taco Tuesday!
 
2014-04-15 10:38:04 AM  
The two guys in the cubicles adjacent to me switched to the stand up desk fad a while back, so I have these creepy little heads peering down on me all the time.
 
2014-04-15 10:41:33 AM  
They pay me enough to sit in a cube and stare out the window at I-275.  I'm okay with it.
 
2014-04-15 10:41:58 AM  
Guuberre:

CSB:
Apparently, whoever designed the new office space didn't take into account that hard, flat surfaces reflect sound. My new cubicle is directly across from the break room, which has lots of cabinets with hard, flat, shiny surfaces. Nothing in that room absorbs sound in any way. Essentially, I'm sitting directly across from a loudspeaker. I'm sitting there one afternoon talking to a co-worker (she was facing me with her back to the break room) when someone else walked into the break room and farted. LOUDLY. It resonated. People have no awareness of their surroundings.
/CSB


at our old office, my cube was directly across from the men's room door.  The sounds coming out of that area were enough to make me not work there anymore.  I won't even start with the stink.
 
2014-04-15 10:42:15 AM  
I traded over 8 years at a cube farm for my own designated space.

About 125 sq. ft., chill music playing, a sound machine playing at a lower volume, a diffuser with lemon grass or tangerine, walls with actual insulation so that I can't hear my co-workers, variable soft lighting, a constant 70 degree temp -  and I am usually rubbing lotion or oil on women who pay for this and tip as well!

Breaks every hour. Owners who are cool. No micro management. Down time is usually spent in my "office" laying on the heated table napping or playing games on my phone.
 
2014-04-15 10:43:40 AM  
I miss my old cubicle farm. I used to be able to curl up under my cubicle, pull my chair in and catch a little shut eye without anybody noticing. Now I'm stuck in the corner of some old broom closet in the basement at a bench in front of 4 giant monitors with the constant buzz from the data center behind me. Why is the data center in the basement? I have know idea.
 
2014-04-15 10:47:12 AM  

CaptSS: I traded over 8 years at a cube farm for my own designated space.

About 125 sq. ft., chill music playing, a sound machine playing at a lower volume, a diffuser with lemon grass or tangerine, walls with actual insulation so that I can't hear my co-workers, variable soft lighting, a constant 70 degree temp -  and I am usually rubbing lotion or oil on women who pay for this and tip as well!

Breaks every hour. Owners who are cool. No micro management. Down time is usually spent in my "office" laying on the heated table napping or playing games on my phone.


And this job pays how much?

Not sure i would want to rub lotion on some fat gelatinous hosebag, but then again for the right amount of money my "wont do" list is quite small.
 
2014-04-15 11:08:02 AM  
I remember having several desks in a room and no cubes. Made for good rubber band wars.
 
2014-04-15 11:08:49 AM  
Where's the "get back to twerk" gif????
 
2014-04-15 11:09:51 AM  

tricycleracer: stuartp9: Or if you were offered a chance to work from home you would refuse?

I work from home one day a week.  If it wasn't for the fact that I get to do all my laundry, I wouldn't do it.  It's seriously boring.


There's your problem. Replace laundry with alcohol and you have a recipe for fun.
 
2014-04-15 11:13:30 AM  

Danger Mouse: CaptSS: I traded over 8 years at a cube farm for my own designated space.

About 125 sq. ft., chill music playing, a sound machine playing at a lower volume, a diffuser with lemon grass or tangerine, walls with actual insulation so that I can't hear my co-workers, variable soft lighting, a constant 70 degree temp -  and I am usually rubbing lotion or oil on women who pay for this and tip as well!

Breaks every hour. Owners who are cool. No micro management. Down time is usually spent in my "office" laying on the heated table napping or playing games on my phone.

And this job pays how much?

Not sure i would want to rub lotion on some fat gelatinous hosebag, but then again for the right amount of money my "wont do" list is quite small.


I actually track this daily and with pay and tips it is $34.15 per hour YTD. And that number is a bit misleading/understated. It includes my hourly pay which is gross, and at times a cash tip which is considered net. So if someone tips me $15 cash it is the equivalent of earning $18 gross. I work 4-9 hours a day 5 days a week. I choose my days and hours so my income can vary but I stay fairly consistent.

Fortunately I am in an area where it seems the women care about their bodies. I do get the occasional client that is a solid mass of fat or has more moles than hairs on your head but I just ignore that. And I get the occasional male who is not homophobic and just wants a massage. My wife has a job that pays very well with excellent benefits so having a variable work load isn't really an issue. Been doing it 5 years now. Never, and I mean never, do I have to deal with an angry jerk or idiot. And if for some strange reason someone comes in less than chipper, they certainly leave with a different mindset.

And no, I don't give happy endings!
 
2014-04-15 11:13:55 AM  

LemSkroob: Don't worry about cubicles. You are losing them, too.

Welcome to 'benching'

More asses in less floor space. Thats all that matters.


In my past job I had the pleasure of experiencing benching for a good 3 years. I always joked that it was a matter of time before they implemented the bunk benches.

Luckily I was laid off. Im sure it was only a matter of time before somone got all shootey in that hell hole.
 
2014-04-15 11:15:32 AM  
At this one office I worked at about 4 years ago they had a ecent set up. Cubes for the new people, cubes next to windows for the more senoir staff. An inner office for low level/mid manager and window offices for senior managers and full partners. I myself had a nice corner in the basement with a desk and phone and like it there because nobody knew where I was so they couldnt just stop by they either had to email me or call.
 
2014-04-15 11:19:47 AM  

Deep Contact: I remember having several desks in a room and no cubes. Made for good rubber band wars.


We have an open office.  Here is what I have at my desk...
 
2014-04-15 11:22:42 AM  

Buttknuckle: Deep Contact: I remember having several desks in a room and no cubes. Made for good rubber band wars.

We have an open office.  Here is what I have at my desk...


i105.photobucket.com
 
2014-04-15 11:25:04 AM  
I've worked all three: open, cube, and new style picnic table open. The true open style was probably the best with no offices at all, manager desks just set off a few feet from everyone else.

Open style - meetings? Hardly ever happened, just kind of an ongoing thing where everyone was in the loop. If something came up you just mentioned it. Yeah, people talked a lot, but when crunch time came the work could really be pumped out. We all tended to do our own thing for lunch. The boss was always right there if you needed a quick decision.

Cube - First thing that hit me was how personalized everything was inside the box and I thought it would be cool. After a couple weeks though, got pretty boring. Much more time was spent on emails between each other than the open plan; someone sends a memo and you either had to call them from 15 foot away or get up and walk over to find they were on the phone with someone else. Had to really stay on top of things to know what was going on, cubes were their own little world where you didn't have to do anything, or be slaying major dragons and nobody knew. Took me a while to get into the meeting thing, it was such a routine; everyone would hit the restroom, grab drinks, do a pre-meeting, then the meeting would start and always go long. It was a presentation where 2 minutes of info was stretched out, because meetings, well, they were always a certain time frame - you didn't make people go through all the meeting foreplay for a 2 minute gab. Then if an idea was thrown out, upper management was in their office someplace, so things stood still for the follow up. If upper management did attend there was tension, because you really didn't work with them on a regular basis, and most of their time was spent on introductions. After coming from open, the cubes were like working half speed where anything important could be put of by sending an email.

Work in an open plan flows, like floating down a river in a raft - never really stops and you may not like the person next to you, but you don't notice during the rapids. Cubical plan is like walking up stairs by yourself and stopping at every landing to break up the monotony.

Picnic table or cafe plan? Hey! Lets take all the bad things from both open and cube, put them together and make everyone feel like they work in a high school lunchroom.
 
2014-04-15 11:34:30 AM  
We moved buildings a few years ago and got the new floor plans with the smaller walls between cubes, and taller walls facing the "hallways". The cubes are usually set up in groups of six, sometimes four. I hate hate hate the half walls, and the fact that my back is basically positioned to whoever chooses to drop in on me, so they have a full view of whatever I'm doing.

Our last building had full walls and then "shower doors" that you could slide shut. There was a small opaque window, and I sat at the end of a hallway, so no one could sneak up on me -- the window was positioned right in the corner of my eye, and anyone coming down that hall was either coming to talk to me or was lost. Everyone kept their doors shut for some semblance of privacy, so it wasn't treated as a "keep out" signal, it was just how we all were.

Sure, working in a cubicle isn't my dream, but the pay I bring home is light years better than anything I could make in retail (even as a retail owner), and it would take me too long to get up to this level of pay if I worked in the trades.

Apparently we're going to be moving to flexible work arrangements where we won't have phones, just our blackberries (can't wait to see how that'll work for media relations or public enquiries, where we have one incoming number that rings at multiple desks), and some departments already have the option to work from home. My director will never let that last one fly -- it's already treated as a special boon if you do work from home on a given day, and compressed work weeks are Not Allowed (TM).
 
2014-04-15 11:36:11 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-04-15 11:41:46 AM  

Aphrodite: We moved buildings a few years ago and got the new floor plans with the smaller walls between cubes, and taller walls facing the "hallways". The cubes are usually set up in groups of six, sometimes four. I hate hate hate the half walls, and the fact that my back is basically positioned to whoever chooses to drop in on me, so they have a full view of whatever I'm doing.

Our last building had full walls and then "shower doors" that you could slide shut. There was a small opaque window, and I sat at the end of a hallway, so no one could sneak up on me -- the window was positioned right in the corner of my eye, and anyone coming down that hall was either coming to talk to me or was lost. Everyone kept their doors shut for some semblance of privacy, so it wasn't treated as a "keep out" signal, it was just how we all were.

Sure, working in a cubicle isn't my dream, but the pay I bring home is light years better than anything I could make in retail (even as a retail owner), and it would take me too long to get up to this level of pay if I worked in the trades.

Apparently we're going to be moving to flexible work arrangements where we won't have phones, just our blackberries (can't wait to see how that'll work for media relations or public enquiries, where we have one incoming number that rings at multiple desks), and some departments already have the option to work from home. My director will never let that last one fly -- it's already treated as a special boon if you do work from home on a given day, and compressed work weeks are Not Allowed (TM).


We had the half-walls between the cubes (actually a bit shorter) and I loved this. There is something to be said about human interaction. And I would get great views when the hottie in the next cube leaned over for something. Everybody had a mirror on their desk or shelf to see who was coming. Management couldn't have cared less about the mirrors.
 
2014-04-15 11:45:03 AM  

CaptSS: Aphrodite: We moved buildings a few years ago and got the new floor plans with the smaller walls between cubes, and taller walls facing the "hallways". The cubes are usually set up in groups of six, sometimes four. I hate hate hate the half walls, and the fact that my back is basically positioned to whoever chooses to drop in on me, so they have a full view of whatever I'm doing.

Our last building had full walls and then "shower doors" that you could slide shut. There was a small opaque window, and I sat at the end of a hallway, so no one could sneak up on me -- the window was positioned right in the corner of my eye, and anyone coming down that hall was either coming to talk to me or was lost. Everyone kept their doors shut for some semblance of privacy, so it wasn't treated as a "keep out" signal, it was just how we all were.

Sure, working in a cubicle isn't my dream, but the pay I bring home is light years better than anything I could make in retail (even as a retail owner), and it would take me too long to get up to this level of pay if I worked in the trades.

Apparently we're going to be moving to flexible work arrangements where we won't have phones, just our blackberries (can't wait to see how that'll work for media relations or public enquiries, where we have one incoming number that rings at multiple desks), and some departments already have the option to work from home. My director will never let that last one fly -- it's already treated as a special boon if you do work from home on a given day, and compressed work weeks are Not Allowed (TM).

We had the half-walls between the cubes (actually a bit shorter) and I loved this. There is something to be said about human interaction. And I would get great views when the hottie in the next cube leaned over for something. Everybody had a mirror on their desk or shelf to see who was coming. Management couldn't have cared less about the mirrors.


Oh, I definitely enjoy the socializing, but I generally prefer to go to someone else's desk to do so. The people in my section aren't necessarily the same people I pick to socialize with -- sometimes they're the people I want to complain about. :)
 
2014-04-15 12:01:55 PM  
I went from an office to a cubicle a year ago. That sucked.

Having said that, my neighbors (all female, currently) are OK. Nothing too objectionable, other than the ringing of phones. That shiat is annoying.

The cubicle is at least pretty roomy. Lots of desk space. It's not round, it's more like half-decahedron, kinda. And the office directly opposite me is empty, so at least I don't have someone staring at my back all day, watching me scratch (though I try to keep scratching to a minimum).

We get along OK, as long as we have headphones and a modicum of courtesy. One idiot thinks we should have music piped in. Hopefully that will never happen.
 
2014-04-15 12:11:06 PM  

Rapmaster2000: ChubbyTiger: untaken_name: Because they pay me to. I certainly wouldn't do it for free.

This. I like my job, more or less, but people look at me weird when I say that the only reason I go is because they pay me. Yes, my sole motivation for work is money. Not getting rich, mind you, but money. As if almost everyone doesn't feel the same, deep down.

Yeah, I'm totally here for the money.  Why the hell else would I be here.  "Loving your job" is upper-middle class BS.


What's wrong with loving your job but still only doing it for the money? I really enjoy what I do. That doesn't mean I'd do it for free, because of *course* I'd rather laze around drinking cocktails and daydreaming about what I'm going to fix for dinner and which bottle of wine I'm going to have with it. But I do need to work, and the job I do alternates between pleasantly easy and interestingly challenging, so it's pretty nice as long as I'm not reporting to an asshole.

Since there are too many distractions at home and I tend to do poorly when I don't have some kind of daily routine, I like going into an office, even if all I have is a cube. I go in, I sit in my cube, I do my job, and when I leave my cube, I leave my job behind with it. My own time is my own time. I like keeping things separate.
 
2014-04-15 12:24:28 PM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: [img.fark.net image 640x360]


LOL that picture is used on our "Moving? Call Facilities Management!" posters here.
 
2014-04-15 12:31:30 PM  

hubiestubert: OK, this was a great "office" to work from. The view from the Comerica Club in Phoenix...
Yeah, I'd rather have the space to do my thing, than be walled up in an office.


Those things on the square white plates look kinda delicious.
 
2014-04-15 12:46:13 PM  
Working in a cubicle is like voting for a Democrat.  You do it because the alternative is far worse.
 
2014-04-15 12:46:27 PM  
Notabunny:
...stop, collaborate, and listen...

lancecashion.com
(pictured: Notabunny)
 
2014-04-15 12:47:35 PM  

Smelly Pirate Hooker: hubiestubert: OK, this was a great "office" to work from. The view from the Comerica Club in Phoenix...
Yeah, I'd rather have the space to do my thing, than be walled up in an office.

Those things on the square white plates look kinda delicious.


Crab cakes on mesclun over a potato latkhe and garnished with prosciutto, with a drizzle of sweet pepper glaze. Yeah, they are pretty damn awesome. My chef told me to fill in the back of the serving line with some appetizers, so my assistant and I went buck wild with amuse bouche, just for fun. I don't really miss a lot about Phoenix, but the job with the NHL did give me a LOT of freedom to just play with food.
 
2014-04-15 12:49:15 PM  

Buttknuckle: Buttknuckle: Deep Contact: I remember having several desks in a room and no cubes. Made for good rubber band wars.

We have an open office.  Here is what I have at my desk...

[i105.photobucket.com image 850x637]


That shiat is so obnoxious.  Any of those stupid foam darts that land in my cube immediately go in the trash.
 
2014-04-15 12:50:57 PM  
"Each year, the average American spends nearly 2,000 hours working"

i.imgur.com
 
2014-04-15 12:52:28 PM  

some_beer_drinker: when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.


I'm fat and happy. I do my eight hours in order to take home a very livable wage, and then do what fulfills me during the other times.
 
2014-04-15 01:03:47 PM  

Satan's Bunny Slippers: Prank Call of Cthulhu: [img.fark.net image 640x360]

LOL that picture is used on our "Moving? Call Facilities Management!" posters here.


According to the original filename, it's "woman prairie dogging.jpg".
 
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