If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Atlantic)   "Why do people willingly work in cubicles when the fabric boxes make them so miserable?" Well, probably because it was a better option than running a Walmart cash register   (theatlantic.com) divider line 171
    More: Obvious, American Life, Americans, U.S. Steel, George Packer, division of labour, office space  
•       •       •

5931 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Apr 2014 at 5:35 AM (32 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



171 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-04-15 12:19:22 AM  
You see this relationship between power and design throughout the history of the office: in the early clerical offices (think Bartleby, the Scrivener or Scrooge's office in A Christmas Carol)

I would prefer not to.
 
2014-04-15 12:25:30 AM  
fta open-plan offices diminish very few of the problems associated with cubicle-ridden offices, and in some cases they augment them.

When I was a cube farmer, I enjoyed the fact that management was detached from daily operations and shuttered away behind doors. I loved that I could scratch, pick, and fart with relative anonymity. I loved that we lowly grunts could stop, collaborate, and listen and overcome managerial obstacles to achieving company goals. But now i go crop dusting about every 10 minutes because my ego and self aggrandizement are paramount.
 
2014-04-15 12:34:16 AM  
Fabric-walled booths are very difficult to mop
 
2014-04-15 01:23:52 AM  
www3.familyoldphotos.com

I'm guessing people willingly work in cubicles because this sucked serious ass.
 
2014-04-15 03:14:55 AM  
when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.
 
2014-04-15 05:40:03 AM  
Let's see...work in a cubicle or sleep under a bridge.  Tough choice.

/says the guy who's last office was bigger than most NYC apartments.
 
Skr
2014-04-15 05:41:26 AM  
Pretty easy to personalize your Cube. Heck, get a mini fridge for under the desk and you'll never need to go home.
 
2014-04-15 05:42:09 AM  

some_beer_drinker: when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.


You are a troublemaker. I like you.
 
2014-04-15 05:44:05 AM  

Skr: Pretty easy to personalize your Cube. Heck, get a mini fridge for under the desk and you'll never need to go home.


No unauthorized appliances!  That's one demerit.
 
2014-04-15 05:51:45 AM  
Umm, because you don't have a Choice? Don't have those dividers but my computer desk and another table and credenza have been shoved into a windowless, what used to be a file storage room. That's just the way it is, no choice.
 
2014-04-15 05:52:33 AM  

Relatively Obscure: [www3.familyoldphotos.com image 500x324]

I'm guessing people willingly work in cubicles because this sucked serious ass.


and yet some assholes managed to convince a lot of executive types that the next big thing is open concept, fark me its going to suck.
 
2014-04-15 05:53:24 AM  
..and they're all made out of ticky-tacky
and thy all look just the same,
 
2014-04-15 05:55:52 AM  

Notabunny: fta open-plan offices diminish very few of the problems associated with cubicle-ridden offices, and in some cases they augment them.

When I was a cube farmer, I enjoyed the fact that management was detached from daily operations and shuttered away behind doors. I loved that I could scratch, pick, and fart with relative anonymity. I loved that we lowly grunts could stop, collaborate, and listen and overcome managerial obstacles to achieving company goals. But now i go crop dusting about every 10 minutes because my ego and self aggrandizement are paramount.


This comment makes me miss the days when I taught composition and could reward clever writing.
 
2014-04-15 05:59:13 AM  
I grew up carrying sprinkler pipe on  a potato farm in Idaho for a job in high school.  Try that for a while compared to flipping burgers ;)
 
2014-04-15 05:59:41 AM  
Cubes don't make me miserable, nor do open spaces.  My company probably won't do the latter, but if we did I'd probably prefer it.
 
GBB
2014-04-15 06:00:56 AM  
Notabunny:I loved that we lowly grunts could stop, collaborate, and listen and overcome managerial obstacles to achieving company goals.

The only purpose for mid-level managers is to justify their own existence.
 
2014-04-15 06:02:40 AM  
Willingly and out of necessity are not the same.
 
GBB
2014-04-15 06:02:42 AM  
The whole thing applies.
 
2014-04-15 06:04:32 AM  
zivil.evangelisch.de
Starting point for cubicles.
 
2014-04-15 06:07:58 AM  

BumpInTheNight: Relatively Obscure: [www3.familyoldphotos.com image 500x324]

I'm guessing people willingly work in cubicles because this sucked serious ass.

and yet some assholes managed to convince a lot of executive types that the next big thing is open concept, fark me its going to suck.


Depends on your coworkers.  I worked in an open environment back before it was cool.  It worked for our group because we could all see the gigantic status board and balance our workload amongst ourselves and have conversations about said workload without having to pop up like prairie dogs.  Of course, the company president often threatened to put up cubicle walls to reduce the chatter.  Even tho the chatter was work related and the purpose of the chatter was to ensure that projects were properly prioritized and handled efficiently.  Some people will make problems if they can't find any.

Basically, if your coworkers suck, any configuration will suck.  If your coworkers are great, a PHB will find a way to destroy your productivity.
 
2014-04-15 06:13:49 AM  

some_beer_drinker: when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.


And then what? The jobs that are done in cubicles will still need to be done.
 
2014-04-15 06:18:16 AM  
Where I work, they're re-building all of the floors of the main building: bright, new cubicles for those who work in the office and an open-space area for remote workers who have to come in once or twice a week. I've used that open-space area. Essentially, it's a very long table with phone, electrical, and network connectivity every few feet along both sides of the table. Basically, remote workers come in with their laptops and plug in where they can stare at the person directly across from them. I assume this is what people are referring to as an open-space design.

I'll take my cubicle with it's three walls and ginormous monitor, thank you very much.

CSB:
Apparently, whoever designed the new office space didn't take into account that hard, flat surfaces reflect sound. My new cubicle is directly across from the break room, which has lots of cabinets with hard, flat, shiny surfaces. Nothing in that room absorbs sound in any way. Essentially, I'm sitting directly across from a loudspeaker. I'm sitting there one afternoon talking to a co-worker (she was facing me with her back to the break room) when someone else walked into the break room and farted. LOUDLY. It resonated. People have no awareness of their surroundings.
/CSB
 
2014-04-15 06:18:56 AM  
When the ship jumps off what the fark you gonna do? Damn it feels good to be a gangsta.
 
2014-04-15 06:38:19 AM  
Oh how I long for the days of cubicals. I wanted to write a Four Yorkshiremen sketch to go with that statement but it's 5am.
 
2014-04-15 06:45:11 AM  
I enjoyed my days in a cubicle - the conversations over the walls were outrageous.  Until the day that a new hire was offended by our off-colored jokes. Amazing how one person can suck the life out of an already crappy job.
 
2014-04-15 06:46:45 AM  
My company will be moving buildings in a couple of months. They did a survey a few years ago to find out what was important to us. Top of the list were private offices and windows.

So of course, the decision was made to move to a building with a few shared offices along the windowline, and interior, windowless private offices. And as an added bonus, the current 125-sq.-ft. offices we have become in the new building 75-sq.-ft. singles or 150-sq.-ft. shared. Also, on a completely unrelated note, did you know that a recent survey of American prisons showed that the average prisoner in solitary confinement has an 80-sq.-ft. cell?

Not living in a cube is nice, but a windowless 7.5'x10' pen isn't much of a step up.
 
2014-04-15 06:47:19 AM  

some_beer_drinker: when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.


When will you shepherd us to the killing fields?  When will you slit the throats of some of the moneyed to incite our murderous frenzy?   It is spring, and grass grows thickest when fed by blood choking with cholesterol.
 
2014-04-15 06:47:43 AM  
blog.codinghorror.com
 
2014-04-15 06:51:42 AM  
Because they pay me to. I certainly wouldn't do it for free.
 
2014-04-15 06:55:26 AM  

some_beer_drinker: when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.


HA! Who`s out of touch?

They sold the gold long ago and they bought your and your childrens dreams with it. Now they are keeping us, sorry, you working with the promise of more promises now!
 
2014-04-15 06:55:32 AM  
I work in a cube all day, then when I shop at Walmart the checkouts are self-serve.

Why not both jpg?
 
2014-04-15 06:59:16 AM  

DrunkenBob: some_beer_drinker: when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.

When will you shepherd us to the killing fields?  When will you slit the throats of some of the moneyed to incite our murderous frenzy?   It is spring, and grass grows thickest when fed by blood choking with cholesterol.


Best to defend the status quo with idiotic hyperbole lest people realize there is a better way to live.
 
2014-04-15 07:04:09 AM  

DrPainMD: some_beer_drinker: when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.

And then what? The jobs that are done in cubicles will still need to be done.


That's a generous sentiment.
 
2014-04-15 07:04:12 AM  
Because it's hot as Fark here in the summers.
 
2014-04-15 07:06:23 AM  
After almost 9 years in the industry, and over 6 at my current place, I finally got my own window office late last year... and I would not go back to the cubicles. I love my office. I love that I can close the door. I love having my own coat rack. I have four network jacks, including one directly to the outside. I have a 30 amp outlet if I need it.

Plus, my office is the only one on my floor, aside from the four corner offices, to not have inside windows. The other offices aren't aquariums - it's about 50% frosted glass, but you can still tell if someone is (quietly) railing the secretary on their desk.
 
2014-04-15 07:07:04 AM  
I currently work in an "open design" office.

I would rather have cubicle walls.

Our IT department (which consists of one guy) moved into the break room, which used to be a garage .  Our office is a converted used car lot, with many large windows which makes you feel like you are working in a fishbowl due to being next to a major road and very...very bright lights.  I keep requesting for parabolic shades on the lights but my requests go ignored, its like working outside in the sun, and I think it is giving me a headache.

I am trying to convince my work to move me in there with him because it is darker, quieter, and I am basically IT support (the link between the software and the IT department).
 
2014-04-15 07:08:22 AM  

Nexzus: but you can still tell if someone is (quietly) railing the secretary on their desk.


Why quietly? Is she ugly?
 
2014-04-15 07:10:17 AM  

untaken_name: Because they pay me to. I certainly wouldn't do it for free.


This. I like my job, more or less, but people look at me weird when I say that the only reason I go is because they pay me. Yes, my sole motivation for work is money. Not getting rich, mind you, but money. As if almost everyone doesn't feel the same, deep down.
 
2014-04-15 07:11:34 AM  
I don't mind my cube, it's not tight, the ceilings are 20-some feet high, I've got my three monitors,  sit-stand desk, and I'm good,  if I want privacy we have a few hundred "get away" rooms I can go work in.
 
2014-04-15 07:13:21 AM  

ChubbyTiger: untaken_name: Because they pay me to. I certainly wouldn't do it for free.

This. I like my job, more or less, but people look at me weird when I say that the only reason I go is because they pay me. Yes, my sole motivation for work is money. Not getting rich, mind you, but money. As if almost everyone doesn't feel the same, deep down.


There's even a special term for people who work for free.

/Suckers.
 
2014-04-15 07:18:16 AM  

untaken_name: Nexzus: but you can still tell if someone is (quietly) railing the secretary on their desk.

Why quietly? Is she ugly?


Well, the doors are solid, but the walls are standard "Two sheets of drywall with metal studs" with no sound insulation.

And yeah, ours is pretty ugly. Wouldn't want tidbit that getting around, so I told her she had to be quiet.

/wait, what?
 
2014-04-15 07:21:30 AM  

ChubbyTiger: untaken_name: Because they pay me to. I certainly wouldn't do it for free.

This. I like my job, more or less, but people look at me weird when I say that the only reason I go is because they pay me. Yes, my sole motivation for work is money. Not getting rich, mind you, but money. As if almost everyone doesn't feel the same, deep down.


I wouldn't say it's the onlyreason, but yes it is the main reason, because if they stopped paying me I would stop working, and I never volunteer my time for the company. I have a family, life is short, and I know "karma points" means jack shiat in the business world .  You can call me "not a team player" but I work alone most of the time anyway.

I do get frequent downtime to learn some new skills and mess around with CAD software, as well as do some R&D for the company (which I wouldn't get to do if I didn't work here because the software can cost up to $50,0000 a license), so money isn't the only good thing about my job.
 
2014-04-15 07:34:39 AM  
Because having walls, despite them being thin and short, gives you at least some small measure of privacy.  It's hard to spend even a few minutes on Fark or whatever when everyone in the room can see your screen at any moment.  And it's hard to concentrate on your own work when you can see what everyone else in the room is doing.  And let's face it - private offices are becoming increasingly scarce in large companies that simply can't afford that much empty space.

My team is hiring so many people these days we're bursting at the seams already.  Even the high-level managers have cubicles, and what few offices there are have been largely repurposed into conference rooms.
 
2014-04-15 07:35:52 AM  
I never thought I'd miss the 8x8 cube with the 7 foot high walls my first job at the company provided....until the next step "up"(?) the ladder where I had a 7x7 with 3.5 foot high walls in a more open environment on the other side of town.

Now I'm in my 10th year of fully remote work, with the door to my basement ten feet away and the fridge & TV close at hand.

/I hope I stay on this career path...I could never go back into a traditional office setting.
//Then I'd have to shower every day
///And stop farting every five minutes.
////And the porn.  The sweet, beautiful porn.
 
2014-04-15 07:38:51 AM  
I remember the days of the cube farm..... I was smart enough to sock all they money they gave me away and make smart investments.  I retired at 34 and moved to the tropics so this article and all the comments remind me how glad I am that I escaped from that hell.  A few of the comments stood out:

"when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time"

A. Never. People are farking stupid as hell.  It is entirely possible to take the money they give you and buy your freedom back, however the social machine and everything we watch in America tells us to spend it.

 "I like my job, more or less, but people look at me weird when I say that the only reason I go is because they pay me. Yes, my sole motivation for work is money. Not getting rich, mind you, but money. As if almost everyone doesn't feel the same, deep down. "

A. More of this.  When I communicate with the people I used to work with, many of them claim they like their job and saving up and retiring early wouldn't do it for them.  This is the single most ridiculous thing I have ever heard in my life.  I usually respond with something along the lines of "fine, then go do it and give up your paycheck".  It turns out that it isn't in the realm of possibility and even if they could, they wouldn't drive to work at 6am only to spend all day in their cube taking directions from others.  There would be all kinds of changes in schedule and purpose as to what they do all day.
 
2014-04-15 07:39:23 AM  
Here is a picture of my leg and foot while working.
Office work, blarghhh.img.fark.net
 
2014-04-15 07:42:53 AM  
After reading TFA and this thread, I guess I am spoiled at my office.  We redesigned everything  last year (just five of us in the office area of this location), replacing all the desks, bookshelves, etc. (but not the carpet, sadly) to a very open office area although there is still some privacy.  We are in a historic building so the giant (16' or so) high windows and exposed brick won't be changed any time soon.  For me it was a giant upgrade to be transferred here from another one of my company's locations where I worked in a large, windowless room.

/adding a personal fridge this year
//love my job
 
2014-04-15 07:46:13 AM  

some_beer_drinker: when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.


Sorry,  I got distracted by the new season of Game of Thrones and the announcement that a major movie studio was casting an actor in a comic book movie  that I found most unsatisfactory.
 
2014-04-15 07:48:01 AM  
the only time i've ever had a cubicle-type job was my short employment as a telemarketer, which was undoubtedly the worst and most soul-sucking job i've ever had.  every other job i've ever had has been in a factory running a machine, which has numerous benefits for those of you who think that kind of manual labor work is beneath them.  first of all i get lots of exercise at work.  secondly i work by myself and don't get bothered by annoying people, because we can't just walk away from our machines to chitchat.  thirdly, in my case anyway, i get to make a physical product and i get satisfaction at my job because i know that i built something tangible and real.  my job is alternately challenging and boring, which keeps things interesting.  i don't think i could ever work in an office cubicle job, it would drive me to depression.
 
2014-04-15 07:49:10 AM  
One of the worst management decisions I've had to out up with was when the company decided they needed to foster the "start-up mentality" by cramming a bunch of us (who still had fairly good sized cubes) into a conference room to work on ricketty folding tables. It'll be just like you're working out of somebody's garage!
 
2014-04-15 07:49:17 AM  

Burr: ChubbyTiger: untaken_name: Because they pay me to. I certainly wouldn't do it for free.

This. I like my job, more or less, but people look at me weird when I say that the only reason I go is because they pay me. Yes, my sole motivation for work is money. Not getting rich, mind you, but money. As if almost everyone doesn't feel the same, deep down.

I wouldn't say it's the onlyreason, but yes it is the main reason, because if they stopped paying me I would stop working, and I never volunteer my time for the company. I have a family, life is short, and I know "karma points" means jack shiat in the business world .  You can call me "not a team player" but I work alone most of the time anyway.

I do get frequent downtime to learn some new skills and mess around with CAD software, as well as do some R&D for the company (which I wouldn't get to do if I didn't work here because the software can cost up to $50,0000 a license), so money isn't the only good thing about my job.


I'm totally a team player. As long as i'm being paid to be a member of the team. I do like what I do, and I get to play with neat toys that are worth millions, but I have no illusions and no loyalty beyond that which is purchased. Hmm, I think corporate America is breeding a generation of sociopaths.
 
2014-04-15 07:50:08 AM  
the irony is cubicles were made to give people privacy, but they're more miserable than if everybody sat out in the open with no privacy at all

i'm not sure how that works as i've never had privacy at any job, rarely get any chance to slack off so i just keep focused because what else is there to do?
 
2014-04-15 07:50:49 AM  

jtown: BumpInTheNight: Relatively Obscure: [www3.familyoldphotos.com image 500x324]

I'm guessing people willingly work in cubicles because this sucked serious ass.

and yet some assholes managed to convince a lot of executive types that the next big thing is open concept, fark me its going to suck.

Depends on your coworkers.  I worked in an open environment back before it was cool.  It worked for our group because we could all see the gigantic status board and balance our workload amongst ourselves and have conversations about said workload without having to pop up like prairie dogs.  Of course, the company president often threatened to put up cubicle walls to reduce the chatter.  Even tho the chatter was work related and the purpose of the chatter was to ensure that projects were properly prioritized and handled efficiently.  Some people will make problems if they can't find any.

Basically, if your coworkers suck, any configuration will suck.  If your coworkers are great, a PHB will find a way to destroy your productivity.


I work for a large (really large) global technology and media company. We have an open floor plan. The only way it works for me is if EVERYBODY is on the floor. No offices at all.
 
2014-04-15 07:52:15 AM  

some_beer_drinker: when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.


You first
 
GBB
2014-04-15 07:55:34 AM  

kqc7011: Here is a picture of my leg and foot while working.
Office work, blarghhh.[img.fark.net image 850x637]


Aw hell no.
 
GBB
2014-04-15 07:57:47 AM  

Guuberre: Where I work, they're re-building all of the floors of the main building: bright, new cubicles for those who work in the office and an open-space area for remote workers who have to come in once or twice a week. I've used that open-space area. Essentially, it's a very long table with phone, electrical, and network connectivity every few feet along both sides of the table. Basically, remote workers come in with their laptops and plug in where they can stare at the person directly across from them. I assume this is what people are referring to as an open-space design.

I'll take my cubicle with it's three walls and ginormous monitor, thank you very much.

CSB:
Apparently, whoever designed the new office space didn't take into account that hard, flat surfaces reflect sound. My new cubicle is directly across from the break room, which has lots of cabinets with hard, flat, shiny surfaces. Nothing in that room absorbs sound in any way. Essentially, I'm sitting directly across from a loudspeaker. I'm sitting there one afternoon talking to a co-worker (she was facing me with her back to the break room) when someone else walked into the break room and farted. LOUDLY. It resonated. People have no awareness of their surroundings.
/CSB


Heh, reminds me of the time I walked into the break room and let one rip as loud as I could without sharting.
 
2014-04-15 07:57:50 AM  

untaken_name: Nexzus: but you can still tell if someone is (quietly) railing the secretary on their desk.

Why quietly? Is she ugly?


Quiet sobbing is ok, but the full on waterworks can be a buzzkill
 
2014-04-15 08:00:11 AM  

SpacemanSpoof: Because having walls, despite them being thin and short, gives you at least some small measure of privacy.  It's hard to spend even a few minutes on Fark or whatever when everyone in the room can see your screen at any moment.  And it's hard to concentrate on your own work when you can see what everyone else in the room is doing.  And let's face it - private offices are becoming increasingly scarce in large companies that simply can't afford that much empty space.

My team is hiring so many people these days we're bursting at the seams already.  Even the high-level managers have cubicles, and what few offices there are have been largely repurposed into conference rooms.


And boy, were those managers thrilled to death to have to sit with the workers
 
2014-04-15 08:01:51 AM  

kqc7011: Here is a picture of my leg and foot while working.
Office work, blarghhh.


So you're in an open space environment?
 
2014-04-15 08:03:13 AM  
hmph.  I work in a cube.  I am not stifled, depressed, or otherwise uncomfortable.

Stupid blanket statements are stupid.

Imagine that.
 
2014-04-15 08:16:14 AM  

Satan's Bunny Slippers: hmph.  I work in a cube.  I am not stifled, depressed, or otherwise uncomfortable.

Stupid blanket statements are stupid.

Imagine that.


So if you were offered an office with a window you would refuse?  Or if you were offered a chance to work from home you would refuse?

You may not be stifled or depressed, but you're still one of the sheep.
 
2014-04-15 08:19:06 AM  
when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.

Good God, man, do you know what you're asking for?

imgs.xkcd.com
 
2014-04-15 08:19:25 AM  

Satan's Bunny Slippers: hmph.  I work in a cube.  I am not stifled, depressed, or otherwise uncomfortable.

Stupid blanket statements are stupid.

Imagine that.


I agree with this sentiment.  I like my cube; it is quiet, roomy (some people have EZ chairs in their cubes), has a sliding closing door, we can configure our cubes any way we like (even removing walls if we desire) and I am very productive in there.  Some teams have organized their cubes into work areas by removing the walls between them but keeping their exterior walls.

If I want a conversation with a coworker I can walk to their cube and talk.  Also, in my company of 14k+ employees, there are no offices.  Executive VPs sit in cubes not too far from me.  There are windowless conference rooms of all sizes (3 - 30 people) that anyone can use (by drop-in or reservation) for private or confidential conversations.
 
2014-04-15 08:19:45 AM  
Flexible office space seems to be the way of the future.  Galaxo just built a new headquarters here (claiming that they had so many employees now working from home that they didn't need the space in their old headquarters, but really it was a huge tax dodge) and they have it setup that their employees can work from anywhere in the building, including their vast and very nice atrium.
 
2014-04-15 08:24:41 AM  
I work in a cube farm because I've worked in retail and construction.  Can't say I'd ever want to go back.

I get paid good money and it's a job I love.  I see no downside to this, except maybe the crop dusters.
 
2014-04-15 08:26:23 AM  

PainInTheASP: I work in a cube farm because I've worked in retail and construction.  Can't say I'd ever want to go back.

I get paid good money and it's a job I love.  I see no downside to this, except maybe the crop dusters.


Same here. Took my first office job at 45 and it is like being retired.
Of course, I can't afford retirement, but then again, my chances of being injured in an industrial accident went down about 99%.
 
2014-04-15 08:26:45 AM  
At the last place I worked, we narrowly escaped the big, open plan thing with no set desks and lots of "touch down stations" as they liked to envision them. That got scrapped, but we still ended up with a large low-profile cube farm. Some director must have read some wishy-washy academic paper about collaboration in an open environment and just ran with it.

Ironically, I think it had the reverse effect, but that could just be the staff there. People didn't really talk much to begin with. Forcing them all to be right on top of each other sure wasn't going to make it better.
 
2014-04-15 08:26:49 AM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: My company will be moving buildings in a couple of months. They did a survey a few years ago to find out what was important to us. Top of the list were private offices and windows.

So of course, the decision was made to move to a building with a few shared offices along the windowline, and interior, windowless private offices. And as an added bonus, the current 125-sq.-ft. offices we have become in the new building 75-sq.-ft. singles or 150-sq.-ft. shared. Also, on a completely unrelated note, did you know that a recent survey of American prisons showed that the average prisoner in solitary confinement has an 80-sq.-ft. cell?

Not living in a cube is nice, but a windowless 7.5'x10' pen isn't much of a step up.


Wow, isn't it just terrible when the company listens to you and cares about your happiness?
 
2014-04-15 08:28:56 AM  

Relatively Obscure: [www3.familyoldphotos.com image 500x324]

I'm guessing people willingly work in cubicles because this sucked serious ass.


Ever seen the movie, The Apartment? I'd recommend it. It was Mad Men, the movie.
 
2014-04-15 08:38:23 AM  

stratagos: kqc7011: Here is a picture of my leg and foot while working.
Office work, blarghhh.

So you're in an open space environment?


Free range worker. Nice!
 
2014-04-15 08:41:32 AM  

AdamK: the irony is cubicles were made to give people privacy, but they're more miserable than if everybody sat out in the open with no privacy at all



I worked in an open office environment for a while and it was pretty miserable. Supervisors constantly lurking over your sholder seeing what you are doing on your computer, berating you if you have a non-work related website open (or even questioning how a site is work related if you are there for work reserching something). Even slouching in your chair was considered "unprofessional" and could get you a counseling session. The term "run in place" was common because if you ever gave the impression that you were not working, even to strech for a couple seconds after hours of straight working, then the supervisor would stop by and either grill you on what you have been doing or find something for you to do regardless of what you are working on.

I recently volunteered to be lent out to another group in the company temporarily to assist them on their project, and they have cubes and a supervisor that assignes you a job and leaves you alone to get it done. Sure, i am on a main row near a break room that has lots of people walking by, but during my time here i have not had a single person berate me (with one exception when one of my old supervisors decided to stop by and saw me slouching in my cube). Even though my work load is much greater here than my other job, my stress level is lower and productivity is higher (even with me stopping by Fark).

tl;dr: It is less cubes vs. open office and more how supervisors handle their people
 
2014-04-15 08:47:01 AM  

stratagos: SpacemanSpoof: Because having walls, despite them being thin and short, gives you at least some small measure of privacy.  It's hard to spend even a few minutes on Fark or whatever when everyone in the room can see your screen at any moment.  And it's hard to concentrate on your own work when you can see what everyone else in the room is doing.  And let's face it - private offices are becoming increasingly scarce in large companies that simply can't afford that much empty space.

My team is hiring so many people these days we're bursting at the seams already.  Even the high-level managers have cubicles, and what few offices there are have been largely repurposed into conference rooms.

And boy, were those managers thrilled to death to have to sit with the workers


I work off the main site so I have a really nice office while my director has a cubicle on the main site.

Yay for personal offices. Besides they don't want me ranting and taunting my computer to dare not work in a more public scene.
 
2014-04-15 08:50:36 AM  
Nikil Saval hs a pretty good publicist, since this book advert has been hawed to at least four different online media outlets over the last 48 hours.
 
2014-04-15 08:51:15 AM  

stuartp9: Satan's Bunny Slippers: hmph.  I work in a cube.  I am not stifled, depressed, or otherwise uncomfortable.

Stupid blanket statements are stupid.

Imagine that.

So if you were offered an office with a window you would refuse?  Or if you were offered a chance to work from home you would refuse?

You may not be stifled or depressed, but you're still one of the sheep.


Who said I didn't have a window?  I have a window.  It's right *here*, I can just reach out and touch it.

I've had offices with two windows.  And doors.  I'm not missing anything.

Nice try though.
 
2014-04-15 08:53:24 AM  

Typhoid: Prank Call of Cthulhu: My company will be moving buildings in a couple of months. They did a survey a few years ago to find out what was important to us. Top of the list were private offices and windows.

So of course, the decision was made to move to a building with a few shared offices along the windowline, and interior, windowless private offices. And as an added bonus, the current 125-sq.-ft. offices we have become in the new building 75-sq.-ft. singles or 150-sq.-ft. shared. Also, on a completely unrelated note, did you know that a recent survey of American prisons showed that the average prisoner in solitary confinement has an 80-sq.-ft. cell?

Not living in a cube is nice, but a windowless 7.5'x10' pen isn't much of a step up.

Wow, isn't it just terrible when the company listens to you and cares about your happiness?


We expressed a desire for private offices on a windowline and got shared offices on a windowline, and they reduced the office size by 40%, and that's the company listening? Dang, I'd hate to see what happens when they don't pay attention.
 
2014-04-15 08:55:46 AM  
I recently changed jobs from where I had an office (with a window to boot), to one where I'm in a cubical farm.  I really miss the office when there's constant chatter going on around me, and the people moving outside my cube 'door' constantly distracts me.  There's talk about getting some sort of sliding doors for the cubes to give us a little more privacy, but no ETA on that.

First thing I did was to shift my monitors so my back wasn't to the cube opening.  Absolutely can not stand having people sneak up on me like that.
 
2014-04-15 08:58:18 AM  

stuartp9: Satan's Bunny Slippers: hmph.  I work in a cube.  I am not stifled, depressed, or otherwise uncomfortable.

Stupid blanket statements are stupid.

Imagine that.

So if you were offered an office with a window you would refuse?  Or if you were offered a chance to work from home you would refuse?

You may not be stifled or depressed, but you're still one of the sheep.


Oh, and it's cute you think calling people sheep is.....I don't know what you try to achieve with that.

Adults aren't all that easily insulted by it.
 
2014-04-15 09:00:52 AM  

Deep Contact: stratagos: kqc7011: Here is a picture of my leg and foot while working.
Office work, blarghhh.

So you're in an open space environment?

Free range worker. Nice!


The Walmart greeter is kind of a free-range worker
 
2014-04-15 09:01:08 AM  
Cube life is all about who you're commiserating working with. I've had the good fortune of some awesome coworkers at my current job, including this one for the past five years, directly behind me:

img.fark.net

/April Fool's prank on coworker by their sibling
//his reign will end in a couple weeks, sob
///but telecommuting is on the horizon
 
2014-04-15 09:03:05 AM  
or you know, maybe get a job that doesnt require working in a miserable office.  the pay may not be there but for christs sake you are not working in the office.  and working in retail is not the only option btw.

/jus saying
 
2014-04-15 09:10:38 AM  
I have a cube with a window. I don't mind it so much, except in the winter, when it can be far too cold. My job is annoying as hell, but it has little to do with the cube. An office wouldn't help much. And a huge no thanks to working at home more than once a week. My marriage won't survive more than that.
 
2014-04-15 09:10:41 AM  
As a chef, the conditions I work under are often grueling. On my feet for hours on end, with fire, sharp objects, lifting heavy sh*t, lugging around heavy sh*t, occasionally dealing with hazardous chemicals, with a fair amount of stress, time constraints, and a waitstaff that sometimes seems as if they have been specifically trained to frustrate smooth operations, and sometimes for owners who have little to know actual knowledge of how their businesses should operate, and fielding fire between their expectations and the nuts and bolts of the day to day running.

This being said: my least favorite thing in this sort of job is the office scut work. It's important, and I have a real office, with a door, and it's not a cubicle, and a bottle of bourbon is seen as not just normal, it's an essential privilege of the position. Time in the office is time that I'm not in the kitchen. It's time that I'm not cooking. It's absolutely necessary--someone has to do the ordering, field calls to distributors, maintenance, papers, and with new hires and the like--not to mention actually assemble the reports so that I can see where money is going with labor and food costs, so that I can actually manage the damn place so that it runs correctly, and with a profit. It's mounded with a sh*t ton of purchase orders, with invoices, a board with numbers plastered upon it so that I can quickly call folks, schedules and events, and a lot of those just wind up in file cabinets so that I can call them up later if I have to defend expenses, or just do some forensics to see what might have happened months down the line. And I despise that office. After working in a kitchen, with all the smells and aromas, and the open space, it's like getting stuck in a closet to do work that no one likes. Even if that work is important. Like coming up with new menus, pulling together figures that illustrate exactly what we're doing--and the bang up job that my crew has done--or comparing and contrasting new products or equipment to see if we can shave some bucks down the line. It's part of the job, but even a pretty office with wood paneling or gleaming white, it will still be an office.

The only office time that I enjoyed was at the Iron Horse. There, we had desks in our dry storage area, and it was IN the space I needed to be in. I would come in early sometimes to write, and it was only comfortable, because it was sort of makeshift, with a crappy couch scavenged from upstairs, but it was right, because it reflected the needs of the restaurant and club, and reminded me exactly what I was doing, and why. An office? That's shoving me into a room that removes me from the operations and is foreign to the work and the craft. I'd rather be put downstairs with a desk just a few yards from a walk in, and able to hear the groans of the pipes and the hum of the refrigeration, because while I'm doing the scut work, I can absorb what I need to concentrate on. Down in that sh*tty office at the Horse, I caught a lot of maintenance issues because the sounds changed. The temperature was off. There were little signs of something being off, and I could catch that while I was poring over spreadsheets and invoices. Offices make me skeevy...
 
2014-04-15 09:10:43 AM  

some_beer_drinker: when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.


Once they do, the more aggressive, more driven and charismatic sheep will become the new leaders until "The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which. "
 
2014-04-15 09:13:10 AM  

abhorrent1: Willingly and out of necessity are not the same.


Shh don't tell the porn fanatics that you'll ruin it.
 
2014-04-15 09:14:08 AM  
Management understands fark-all about architecture or design.  Our building was designed and built with a roomy and tasteful client reception area, floor to ceiling windows on one end to let in the light and let the cube farmers or passing workers know what the weather was like outside, couches and short tables...    and some manager had workmen wall the entire area off and turn it into  a private office and conference room, so he could have that window all to himself.  You constantly hear manages that don't understand or appreciate the idea of "white space" in a visual composition, or the balance of space to mass in a building. They all want to "fill in that wasted space".
 
2014-04-15 09:14:54 AM  
you know what they say - "Do what you love"

And if that doesn't pay the bills, take lots of anti-depressants and keep repeating to yourself "I love what I do".
 
2014-04-15 09:17:33 AM  
A few years back I changed jobs and traded a window office for an interior windowless office. I don't miss the windows, but I probably wouldn't turn one down if offered. The cube farm denizens outside my door seem more affected by crazy middle managers than by the cube walls. I have a relatively unique set of skills that lets me work my kick ass job without a middle manager, and mostly without subordinates. I wouldn't trade that for all the window offices anywhere.
 
2014-04-15 09:20:11 AM  
two words: direct deposit

(that's why)
 
kab
2014-04-15 09:24:07 AM  

kqc7011: Here is a picture of my leg and foot while working.
Office work, blarghhh.[img.fark.net image 850x637]


I'll stick to the cubicle, thanks :)
 
2014-04-15 09:32:38 AM  
Don't worry about cubicles. You are losing them, too.

Welcome to 'benching'

corovan.com

More asses in less floor space. Thats all that matters.
 
2014-04-15 09:34:38 AM  

Lapdance: Umm, because you don't have a Choice? Don't have those dividers but my computer desk and another table and credenza have been shoved into a windowless, what used to be a file storage room. That's just the way it is, no choice.


You could set the building on fire.
 
2014-04-15 09:35:59 AM  

ChubbyTiger: untaken_name: Because they pay me to. I certainly wouldn't do it for free.

This. I like my job, more or less, but people look at me weird when I say that the only reason I go is because they pay me. Yes, my sole motivation for work is money. Not getting rich, mind you, but money. As if almost everyone doesn't feel the same, deep down.


Yeah, I'm totally here for the money.  Why the hell else would I be here.  "Loving your job" is upper-middle class BS.
 
2014-04-15 09:36:09 AM  
I like working in my cube because I find happiness in the fact that I am providing for my family. Also, I like nice things and they cost money. I have often thought of trying to start my own business and "be my own boss" but that usually requires even more hours in a week. I just shrug and figure other people must be geniuses to scoff at a life of working since they have figured life out without doing it. Enjoy huffing your own farts guys.
 
2014-04-15 09:36:45 AM  

stuartp9: Or if you were offered a chance to work from home you would refuse?


I work from home one day a week.  If it wasn't for the fact that I get to do all my laundry, I wouldn't do it.  It's seriously boring.
 
2014-04-15 09:37:40 AM  

PainInTheASP: I work in a cube farm because I've worked in retail and construction.  Can't say I'd ever want to go back.

I get paid good money and it's a job I love.  I see no downside to this, except maybe the crop dusters.


That.  After working in a shop doing custom paint jobs and moonlighting as a repo agent popping trucks for a few years, 8-5 in a cube starts looking mighty fine.
 
2014-04-15 09:38:40 AM  

Burr: I currently work in an "open design" office.

I would rather have cubicle walls.

Our IT department (which consists of one guy) moved into the break room, which used to be a garage .  Our office is a converted used car lot, with many large windows which makes you feel like you are working in a fishbowl due to being next to a major road and very...very bright lights.  I keep requesting for parabolic shades on the lights but my requests go ignored, its like working outside in the sun, and I think it is giving me a headache.

I am trying to convince my work to move me in there with him because it is darker, quieter, and I am basically IT support (the link between the software and the IT department).



Sounds like the "IT department" doesn't like you and has the boss's ear.

serial_crusher: One of the worst management decisions I've had to out up with was when the company decided they needed to foster the "start-up mentality" by cramming a bunch of us (who still had fairly good sized cubes) into a conference room to work on ricketty folding tables. It'll be just like you're working out of somebody's garage!


What in the hell is wrong with some of these people?  That is the product of a truly and lamentably stupid mind.
 
2014-04-15 09:40:03 AM  
Back in the 90's I worked for a SW dev company that decided to do away with the cubes and everyone worked out in the open on long tables and had work centers.

Wow. What a cluster fark. People started to get very very very possesive of thier space, some marking thier area of the work stations off with masking tape, others building "walls" with bulletin and white boards, stakcing things up to create boundries. There where open yelling matches between folks about "encrouching" on thier space, knowcking people's stuff off thier area's. Getting upset about how some people decorated thier space. It was farking sureal.
 
2014-04-15 09:41:24 AM  

tricycleracer: stuartp9: Or if you were offered a chance to work from home you would refuse?

I work from home one day a week.  If it wasn't for the fact that I get to do all my laundry, I wouldn't do it.  It's seriously boring.


I worked out of my house for a about a year. Taking the commute out of my life was huge but it did get boring not having any in-person interaction. Some days I would take a few hours and go down the road to Starbucks and work there to brighten the day.
 
2014-04-15 09:44:38 AM  
Meh. i like cubicles.
id like an office a little better i guess.
 
2014-04-15 09:47:39 AM  

Danger Mouse: Back in the 90's I worked for a SW dev company that decided to do away with the cubes and everyone worked out in the open on long tables and had work centers.

Wow. What a cluster fark. People started to get very very very possesive of thier space, some marking thier area of the work stations off with masking tape, others building "walls" with bulletin and white boards, stakcing things up to create boundries. There where open yelling matches between folks about "encrouching" on thier space, knowcking people's stuff off thier area's. Getting upset about how some people decorated thier space. It was farking sureal.


theconservativetreehouse.files.wordpress.com

That's ridiculous!
 
2014-04-15 09:49:59 AM  
I worked in a cubicle for 30 years. It didn't bother me at all. NO, NOT AT ALL!  NO, NO, NOT AT ALL!
 
2014-04-15 09:50:13 AM  

BumpInTheNight: Relatively Obscure: [www3.familyoldphotos.com image 500x324]

I'm guessing people willingly work in cubicles because this sucked serious ass.

and yet some assholes managed to convince a lot of executive types that the next big thing is open concept, fark me its going to suck.


It does suck. Our management is all about fad things they read in magazines (our CIO personally went through both floors of IT measuring the pictures to makes ensure they were hanging at the "optimum" height to motivate people. We moved into a giant open floorplan where you can't have a normal conversation or talk to people on the phone because it's too damn loud.

I handle over half of our company's trade secrets. I now go home whenver I have to do work on those systems, because I'm not leaving that up on monitors anyone can see if they wander through. It's absolutely retarded.
 
2014-04-15 09:50:57 AM  
I've always worked in an open plan environment. I like it. The only time I've had to work in cubes has been on visits to the US, and I find it oppressive.

I'm not really that much of a fan of offices either. Overhearing other people's conversations about technical issues (and therefore being able to butt in when they're talking bullshiat) is vital.
 
2014-04-15 09:53:29 AM  
OK, this was a great "office" to work from. The view from the Comerica Club in Phoenix...

lh4.googleusercontent.com
lh3.googleusercontent.com
lh5.googleusercontent.com
lh6.googleusercontent.com
lh6.googleusercontent.com
lh6.googleusercontent.com
lh3.googleusercontent.com
lh5.googleusercontent.com
lh6.googleusercontent.com
lh4.googleusercontent.com

Yeah, I'd rather have the space to do my thing, than be walled up in an office.
 
2014-04-15 09:56:45 AM  
"Human beings weren't meant to sit in little cubicles, staring at computer screens all day."

If human beings were "meant" to do anything, they're meant to wander around, live shiatty lives, and die young.

It's a fair trade.
 
2014-04-15 09:56:47 AM  
I work for a large Fortune 500 company, and for what I do, the cube set up works well. It's good to hear what is going on so we can collaborate on things.  We are fortunate because we have a lot of great people.  The biggest complaint is the hosebeast who clears her throat 100 times a day. She sounds like a warthog, but I'll take that over dealing with the public.
 
2014-04-15 09:59:01 AM  

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: Sounds like the "IT department" doesn't like you and has the boss's ear.


Nah, IT loves me, because I lighten his work load whenever I can.  I just have so many damn jobs in this company they like to see me out in the "work area".

We are working on an application proposal for the company.  If that gets approved then I will hopefully be able to move out there with him.
 
2014-04-15 09:59:51 AM  
When I graduated from college and started my professional life 35 years ago there were no cubicals.  My first workplace was a virtual ocean of desks and drafting tables in a giant windowless room, surrounded by doorless individual offices for the higher-ups.  Workers were free to smoke cigarettes at their desks, and if they smoked so did you whether you wanted to or not.

Work got a whole lot better the day they moved us to a new building with individual cubicals and banned indoor smoking.  It's easy to complain about the dreary grey fabric walls when you don't remember the earlier alternative.  Of course we should all have mahogany panelled individual offices with euro-modern office furniture, a private bathroom and a window view, and good luck with that.
 
2014-04-15 10:01:03 AM  
I have a cube with a nice view of downtown Richmond across the James River and off the main foot traffic path.  I'm not micromanaged, the floor is quiet, and no one cares if I'm on the internet as long as I get my work done.  I don't love my job (or hate it for that matter) but I've worked way worse jobs--yes, including running a Walmart cash register.
 
2014-04-15 10:05:21 AM  

Lapdance: Umm, because you don't have a Choice?


This.

If you're a cubicle dweller, chances are someone who isn't has decided where you will sit and when, and you have very little to no say about it.
 
2014-04-15 10:05:38 AM  
Office cubes suck, but not real bad.  Kind of in the way that everything sucks except what you really want to be doing.  Happy give all your beer money to the government tax day.
 
2014-04-15 10:06:53 AM  

kqc7011: Here is a picture of my leg and foot while working.
Office work, blarghhh.[img.fark.net image 850x637]


Here's me climbing up to my office yesterday:
img.fark.net
 
2014-04-15 10:08:52 AM  

Last Man on Earth: Lapdance: Umm, because you don't have a Choice? Don't have those dividers but my computer desk and another table and credenza have been shoved into a windowless, what used to be a file storage room. That's just the way it is, no choice.

You could set the building on fire.


encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com

 
2014-04-15 10:09:43 AM  

pi8you: Cube life is all about who you're commiserating working with. I've had the good fortune of some awesome coworkers at my current job, including this one for the past five years, directly behind me:

[img.fark.net image 640x480]


That's...  That's...  Byoo-Ti-Full!!!


/I envy you
 
2014-04-15 10:10:49 AM  

Relatively Obscure: [www3.familyoldphotos.com image 500x324]

I'm guessing people willingly work in cubicles because this sucked serious ass.



A while ago I was briefly unemployed when my studio went under.  We were eventually bought out, and able to bring back most of our people, but for a month or two I was interviewing at various game dev houses, and got to see a lot of 'modern' workplace designs.  This picture looks almost exactly like how one big-name, AAA studio I'm not going to name keeps their engineers-a hundred plus or more prime neckbeards stuffed into a cavernous work hall, elbow to elbow, with everyone whispering and wearing headphones so they don't distract anyone else.  Meanwhile upstairs, there were huge open 'play' areas full of games that no one had time to play, couches that no one had time to lounge on, and break rooms for people who didn't have time to take breaks because they were working so much, because that's how game dev works.

The manager giving me the tour literally could not comprehend how I thought it was a waste of space.  'But people LIKE working in an open environment!  They all tell me that!'

I didn't bother scheduling a follow up interview.

Lucky for me, we ended up getting purchased by a big-name dev studio, and I got back to my office with windows and managers who aren't clueless morons.
 
2014-04-15 10:11:51 AM  

fusillade762: You see this relationship between power and design throughout the history of the office: in the early clerical offices (think Bartleby, the Scrivener or Scrooge's office in A Christmas Carol)

I would prefer not to.


Damn, not a single response?! I appreciate what you did there.
 
2014-04-15 10:28:08 AM  

Notabunny: fta open-plan offices diminish very few of the problems associated with cubicle-ridden offices, and in some cases they augment them.

When I was a cube farmer, I enjoyed the fact that management was detached from daily operations and shuttered away behind doors. I loved that I could scratch, pick, and fart with relative anonymity. I loved that we lowly grunts could stop, collaborate, and listen and overcome managerial obstacles to achieving company goals. But now i go crop dusting about every 10 minutes because my ego and self aggrandizement are paramount.


You know, it's okay to go to work and not have it be all about the farting every single day.
 
2014-04-15 10:28:35 AM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: My company will be moving buildings in a couple of months. They did a survey a few years ago to find out what was important to us. Top of the list were private offices and windows.

So of course, the decision was made to move to a building with a few shared offices along the windowline, and interior, windowless private offices. And as an added bonus, the current 125-sq.-ft. offices we have become in the new building 75-sq.-ft. singles or 150-sq.-ft. shared. Also, on a completely unrelated note, did you know that a recent survey of American prisons showed that the average prisoner in solitary confinement has an 80-sq.-ft. cell?

Not living in a cube is nice, but a windowless 7.5'x10' pen isn't much of a step up.



I used to work for a print production company that made yearbooks. Twelve hour shifts of scanning yearbook photos all day. Each production team was comprised of four or five people and we were all put together in a small cubicle  where conversation was discouraged and if production was slow and you didn't immediately have any work to do you were not allowed to leave your cubicle and the only thing they would allow to pass the time was to read the company training manuals. You were not allowed to bring in outside reading materials. Management called each production team a cell, and they referred to the members of the team, completely un-ironically, as cell mates.

/If I have to go back to an office job I might kill myself.
 
2014-04-15 10:28:43 AM  

LemSkroob: Don't worry about cubicles. You are losing them, too.

Welcome to 'benching'

[corovan.com image 661x272]

More asses in less floor space. Thats all that matters.


Yup, we are currently in the middle of a similar transition. We currently occupy 10 floors of our downtown office building but the parent company who owns out firm has some formula for how much space each worker should have in order to optimize their profits so we are going from private offices (I love mine) to these open work stations. So ultimately we're going from the 10 floors down to 4 in the name of some shareholder I've never met being able to make an extra 10 cents on his shares.
 
2014-04-15 10:31:23 AM  
To keep the farts in.

Curses to you, Taco Tuesday!
 
2014-04-15 10:38:04 AM  
The two guys in the cubicles adjacent to me switched to the stand up desk fad a while back, so I have these creepy little heads peering down on me all the time.
 
2014-04-15 10:41:33 AM  
They pay me enough to sit in a cube and stare out the window at I-275.  I'm okay with it.
 
2014-04-15 10:41:58 AM  
Guuberre:

CSB:
Apparently, whoever designed the new office space didn't take into account that hard, flat surfaces reflect sound. My new cubicle is directly across from the break room, which has lots of cabinets with hard, flat, shiny surfaces. Nothing in that room absorbs sound in any way. Essentially, I'm sitting directly across from a loudspeaker. I'm sitting there one afternoon talking to a co-worker (she was facing me with her back to the break room) when someone else walked into the break room and farted. LOUDLY. It resonated. People have no awareness of their surroundings.
/CSB


at our old office, my cube was directly across from the men's room door.  The sounds coming out of that area were enough to make me not work there anymore.  I won't even start with the stink.
 
2014-04-15 10:42:15 AM  
I traded over 8 years at a cube farm for my own designated space.

About 125 sq. ft., chill music playing, a sound machine playing at a lower volume, a diffuser with lemon grass or tangerine, walls with actual insulation so that I can't hear my co-workers, variable soft lighting, a constant 70 degree temp -  and I am usually rubbing lotion or oil on women who pay for this and tip as well!

Breaks every hour. Owners who are cool. No micro management. Down time is usually spent in my "office" laying on the heated table napping or playing games on my phone.
 
2014-04-15 10:43:40 AM  
I miss my old cubicle farm. I used to be able to curl up under my cubicle, pull my chair in and catch a little shut eye without anybody noticing. Now I'm stuck in the corner of some old broom closet in the basement at a bench in front of 4 giant monitors with the constant buzz from the data center behind me. Why is the data center in the basement? I have know idea.
 
2014-04-15 10:47:12 AM  

CaptSS: I traded over 8 years at a cube farm for my own designated space.

About 125 sq. ft., chill music playing, a sound machine playing at a lower volume, a diffuser with lemon grass or tangerine, walls with actual insulation so that I can't hear my co-workers, variable soft lighting, a constant 70 degree temp -  and I am usually rubbing lotion or oil on women who pay for this and tip as well!

Breaks every hour. Owners who are cool. No micro management. Down time is usually spent in my "office" laying on the heated table napping or playing games on my phone.


And this job pays how much?

Not sure i would want to rub lotion on some fat gelatinous hosebag, but then again for the right amount of money my "wont do" list is quite small.
 
2014-04-15 11:08:02 AM  
I remember having several desks in a room and no cubes. Made for good rubber band wars.
 
2014-04-15 11:08:49 AM  
Where's the "get back to twerk" gif????
 
2014-04-15 11:09:51 AM  

tricycleracer: stuartp9: Or if you were offered a chance to work from home you would refuse?

I work from home one day a week.  If it wasn't for the fact that I get to do all my laundry, I wouldn't do it.  It's seriously boring.


There's your problem. Replace laundry with alcohol and you have a recipe for fun.
 
2014-04-15 11:13:30 AM  

Danger Mouse: CaptSS: I traded over 8 years at a cube farm for my own designated space.

About 125 sq. ft., chill music playing, a sound machine playing at a lower volume, a diffuser with lemon grass or tangerine, walls with actual insulation so that I can't hear my co-workers, variable soft lighting, a constant 70 degree temp -  and I am usually rubbing lotion or oil on women who pay for this and tip as well!

Breaks every hour. Owners who are cool. No micro management. Down time is usually spent in my "office" laying on the heated table napping or playing games on my phone.

And this job pays how much?

Not sure i would want to rub lotion on some fat gelatinous hosebag, but then again for the right amount of money my "wont do" list is quite small.


I actually track this daily and with pay and tips it is $34.15 per hour YTD. And that number is a bit misleading/understated. It includes my hourly pay which is gross, and at times a cash tip which is considered net. So if someone tips me $15 cash it is the equivalent of earning $18 gross. I work 4-9 hours a day 5 days a week. I choose my days and hours so my income can vary but I stay fairly consistent.

Fortunately I am in an area where it seems the women care about their bodies. I do get the occasional client that is a solid mass of fat or has more moles than hairs on your head but I just ignore that. And I get the occasional male who is not homophobic and just wants a massage. My wife has a job that pays very well with excellent benefits so having a variable work load isn't really an issue. Been doing it 5 years now. Never, and I mean never, do I have to deal with an angry jerk or idiot. And if for some strange reason someone comes in less than chipper, they certainly leave with a different mindset.

And no, I don't give happy endings!
 
2014-04-15 11:13:55 AM  

LemSkroob: Don't worry about cubicles. You are losing them, too.

Welcome to 'benching'



More asses in less floor space. Thats all that matters.


In my past job I had the pleasure of experiencing benching for a good 3 years. I always joked that it was a matter of time before they implemented the bunk benches.

Luckily I was laid off. Im sure it was only a matter of time before somone got all shootey in that hell hole.
 
2014-04-15 11:15:32 AM  
At this one office I worked at about 4 years ago they had a ecent set up. Cubes for the new people, cubes next to windows for the more senoir staff. An inner office for low level/mid manager and window offices for senior managers and full partners. I myself had a nice corner in the basement with a desk and phone and like it there because nobody knew where I was so they couldnt just stop by they either had to email me or call.
 
2014-04-15 11:19:47 AM  

Deep Contact: I remember having several desks in a room and no cubes. Made for good rubber band wars.


We have an open office.  Here is what I have at my desk...
 
2014-04-15 11:22:42 AM  

Buttknuckle: Deep Contact: I remember having several desks in a room and no cubes. Made for good rubber band wars.

We have an open office.  Here is what I have at my desk...


i105.photobucket.com
 
2014-04-15 11:25:04 AM  
I've worked all three: open, cube, and new style picnic table open. The true open style was probably the best with no offices at all, manager desks just set off a few feet from everyone else.

Open style - meetings? Hardly ever happened, just kind of an ongoing thing where everyone was in the loop. If something came up you just mentioned it. Yeah, people talked a lot, but when crunch time came the work could really be pumped out. We all tended to do our own thing for lunch. The boss was always right there if you needed a quick decision.

Cube - First thing that hit me was how personalized everything was inside the box and I thought it would be cool. After a couple weeks though, got pretty boring. Much more time was spent on emails between each other than the open plan; someone sends a memo and you either had to call them from 15 foot away or get up and walk over to find they were on the phone with someone else. Had to really stay on top of things to know what was going on, cubes were their own little world where you didn't have to do anything, or be slaying major dragons and nobody knew. Took me a while to get into the meeting thing, it was such a routine; everyone would hit the restroom, grab drinks, do a pre-meeting, then the meeting would start and always go long. It was a presentation where 2 minutes of info was stretched out, because meetings, well, they were always a certain time frame - you didn't make people go through all the meeting foreplay for a 2 minute gab. Then if an idea was thrown out, upper management was in their office someplace, so things stood still for the follow up. If upper management did attend there was tension, because you really didn't work with them on a regular basis, and most of their time was spent on introductions. After coming from open, the cubes were like working half speed where anything important could be put of by sending an email.

Work in an open plan flows, like floating down a river in a raft - never really stops and you may not like the person next to you, but you don't notice during the rapids. Cubical plan is like walking up stairs by yourself and stopping at every landing to break up the monotony.

Picnic table or cafe plan? Hey! Lets take all the bad things from both open and cube, put them together and make everyone feel like they work in a high school lunchroom.
 
2014-04-15 11:34:30 AM  
We moved buildings a few years ago and got the new floor plans with the smaller walls between cubes, and taller walls facing the "hallways". The cubes are usually set up in groups of six, sometimes four. I hate hate hate the half walls, and the fact that my back is basically positioned to whoever chooses to drop in on me, so they have a full view of whatever I'm doing.

Our last building had full walls and then "shower doors" that you could slide shut. There was a small opaque window, and I sat at the end of a hallway, so no one could sneak up on me -- the window was positioned right in the corner of my eye, and anyone coming down that hall was either coming to talk to me or was lost. Everyone kept their doors shut for some semblance of privacy, so it wasn't treated as a "keep out" signal, it was just how we all were.

Sure, working in a cubicle isn't my dream, but the pay I bring home is light years better than anything I could make in retail (even as a retail owner), and it would take me too long to get up to this level of pay if I worked in the trades.

Apparently we're going to be moving to flexible work arrangements where we won't have phones, just our blackberries (can't wait to see how that'll work for media relations or public enquiries, where we have one incoming number that rings at multiple desks), and some departments already have the option to work from home. My director will never let that last one fly -- it's already treated as a special boon if you do work from home on a given day, and compressed work weeks are Not Allowed (TM).
 
2014-04-15 11:36:11 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-04-15 11:41:46 AM  

Aphrodite: We moved buildings a few years ago and got the new floor plans with the smaller walls between cubes, and taller walls facing the "hallways". The cubes are usually set up in groups of six, sometimes four. I hate hate hate the half walls, and the fact that my back is basically positioned to whoever chooses to drop in on me, so they have a full view of whatever I'm doing.

Our last building had full walls and then "shower doors" that you could slide shut. There was a small opaque window, and I sat at the end of a hallway, so no one could sneak up on me -- the window was positioned right in the corner of my eye, and anyone coming down that hall was either coming to talk to me or was lost. Everyone kept their doors shut for some semblance of privacy, so it wasn't treated as a "keep out" signal, it was just how we all were.

Sure, working in a cubicle isn't my dream, but the pay I bring home is light years better than anything I could make in retail (even as a retail owner), and it would take me too long to get up to this level of pay if I worked in the trades.

Apparently we're going to be moving to flexible work arrangements where we won't have phones, just our blackberries (can't wait to see how that'll work for media relations or public enquiries, where we have one incoming number that rings at multiple desks), and some departments already have the option to work from home. My director will never let that last one fly -- it's already treated as a special boon if you do work from home on a given day, and compressed work weeks are Not Allowed (TM).


We had the half-walls between the cubes (actually a bit shorter) and I loved this. There is something to be said about human interaction. And I would get great views when the hottie in the next cube leaned over for something. Everybody had a mirror on their desk or shelf to see who was coming. Management couldn't have cared less about the mirrors.
 
2014-04-15 11:45:03 AM  

CaptSS: Aphrodite: We moved buildings a few years ago and got the new floor plans with the smaller walls between cubes, and taller walls facing the "hallways". The cubes are usually set up in groups of six, sometimes four. I hate hate hate the half walls, and the fact that my back is basically positioned to whoever chooses to drop in on me, so they have a full view of whatever I'm doing.

Our last building had full walls and then "shower doors" that you could slide shut. There was a small opaque window, and I sat at the end of a hallway, so no one could sneak up on me -- the window was positioned right in the corner of my eye, and anyone coming down that hall was either coming to talk to me or was lost. Everyone kept their doors shut for some semblance of privacy, so it wasn't treated as a "keep out" signal, it was just how we all were.

Sure, working in a cubicle isn't my dream, but the pay I bring home is light years better than anything I could make in retail (even as a retail owner), and it would take me too long to get up to this level of pay if I worked in the trades.

Apparently we're going to be moving to flexible work arrangements where we won't have phones, just our blackberries (can't wait to see how that'll work for media relations or public enquiries, where we have one incoming number that rings at multiple desks), and some departments already have the option to work from home. My director will never let that last one fly -- it's already treated as a special boon if you do work from home on a given day, and compressed work weeks are Not Allowed (TM).

We had the half-walls between the cubes (actually a bit shorter) and I loved this. There is something to be said about human interaction. And I would get great views when the hottie in the next cube leaned over for something. Everybody had a mirror on their desk or shelf to see who was coming. Management couldn't have cared less about the mirrors.


Oh, I definitely enjoy the socializing, but I generally prefer to go to someone else's desk to do so. The people in my section aren't necessarily the same people I pick to socialize with -- sometimes they're the people I want to complain about. :)
 
2014-04-15 12:01:55 PM  
I went from an office to a cubicle a year ago. That sucked.

Having said that, my neighbors (all female, currently) are OK. Nothing too objectionable, other than the ringing of phones. That shiat is annoying.

The cubicle is at least pretty roomy. Lots of desk space. It's not round, it's more like half-decahedron, kinda. And the office directly opposite me is empty, so at least I don't have someone staring at my back all day, watching me scratch (though I try to keep scratching to a minimum).

We get along OK, as long as we have headphones and a modicum of courtesy. One idiot thinks we should have music piped in. Hopefully that will never happen.
 
2014-04-15 12:11:06 PM  

Rapmaster2000: ChubbyTiger: untaken_name: Because they pay me to. I certainly wouldn't do it for free.

This. I like my job, more or less, but people look at me weird when I say that the only reason I go is because they pay me. Yes, my sole motivation for work is money. Not getting rich, mind you, but money. As if almost everyone doesn't feel the same, deep down.

Yeah, I'm totally here for the money.  Why the hell else would I be here.  "Loving your job" is upper-middle class BS.


What's wrong with loving your job but still only doing it for the money? I really enjoy what I do. That doesn't mean I'd do it for free, because of *course* I'd rather laze around drinking cocktails and daydreaming about what I'm going to fix for dinner and which bottle of wine I'm going to have with it. But I do need to work, and the job I do alternates between pleasantly easy and interestingly challenging, so it's pretty nice as long as I'm not reporting to an asshole.

Since there are too many distractions at home and I tend to do poorly when I don't have some kind of daily routine, I like going into an office, even if all I have is a cube. I go in, I sit in my cube, I do my job, and when I leave my cube, I leave my job behind with it. My own time is my own time. I like keeping things separate.
 
2014-04-15 12:24:28 PM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: [img.fark.net image 640x360]


LOL that picture is used on our "Moving? Call Facilities Management!" posters here.
 
2014-04-15 12:31:30 PM  

hubiestubert: OK, this was a great "office" to work from. The view from the Comerica Club in Phoenix...
Yeah, I'd rather have the space to do my thing, than be walled up in an office.


Those things on the square white plates look kinda delicious.
 
2014-04-15 12:46:13 PM  
Working in a cubicle is like voting for a Democrat.  You do it because the alternative is far worse.
 
2014-04-15 12:46:27 PM  
Notabunny:
...stop, collaborate, and listen...

lancecashion.com
(pictured: Notabunny)
 
2014-04-15 12:47:35 PM  

Smelly Pirate Hooker: hubiestubert: OK, this was a great "office" to work from. The view from the Comerica Club in Phoenix...
Yeah, I'd rather have the space to do my thing, than be walled up in an office.

Those things on the square white plates look kinda delicious.


Crab cakes on mesclun over a potato latkhe and garnished with prosciutto, with a drizzle of sweet pepper glaze. Yeah, they are pretty damn awesome. My chef told me to fill in the back of the serving line with some appetizers, so my assistant and I went buck wild with amuse bouche, just for fun. I don't really miss a lot about Phoenix, but the job with the NHL did give me a LOT of freedom to just play with food.
 
2014-04-15 12:49:15 PM  

Buttknuckle: Buttknuckle: Deep Contact: I remember having several desks in a room and no cubes. Made for good rubber band wars.

We have an open office.  Here is what I have at my desk...

[i105.photobucket.com image 850x637]


That shiat is so obnoxious.  Any of those stupid foam darts that land in my cube immediately go in the trash.
 
2014-04-15 12:50:57 PM  
"Each year, the average American spends nearly 2,000 hours working"

i.imgur.com
 
2014-04-15 12:52:28 PM  

some_beer_drinker: when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.


I'm fat and happy. I do my eight hours in order to take home a very livable wage, and then do what fulfills me during the other times.
 
2014-04-15 01:03:47 PM  

Satan's Bunny Slippers: Prank Call of Cthulhu: [img.fark.net image 640x360]

LOL that picture is used on our "Moving? Call Facilities Management!" posters here.


According to the original filename, it's "woman prairie dogging.jpg".
 
2014-04-15 01:04:48 PM  
Cubicles?  Luxury!

3.bp.blogspot.com

I have gone from an office to a cubicle to "open space" concept office over the past 15 years.
 
2014-04-15 01:12:34 PM  

cards fan by association: I like working in my cube because I find happiness in the fact that I am providing for my family. Also, I like nice things and they cost money. I have often thought of trying to start my own business and "be my own boss" but that usually requires even more hours in a week. I just shrug and figure other people must be geniuses to scoff at a life of working since they have figured life out without doing it. Enjoy huffing your own farts guys.


About that 'be your own boss' business.

I have over a dozen employees.

I'd rather raise 36 girls, there would be less drama.

But hey, no one whines about my web surfing habits.
 
2014-04-15 01:15:40 PM  
I never saw the problem with cubicles or an open office plan.  It's simple logistics really.  How much space are you going to allocate to each employee?

If you are opening an office in the middle of Nebraska, maybe there isn't much cost associated with it.  But for an office in New York City, or London, space costs a lot of money.  There is still a lot of mixed empirical data on efficiency too.  And, at least some percentage of your workforce wouldn't want a private office.  No really, I don't like it.  And if *everyone* has a private office, it's even worse.
 
2014-04-15 01:44:26 PM  

serial_crusher: Buttknuckle: Buttknuckle: Deep Contact: I remember having several desks in a room and no cubes. Made for good rubber band wars.

We have an open office.  Here is what I have at my desk...

[i105.photobucket.com image 850x637]

That shiat is so obnoxious.  Any of those stupid foam darts that land in my cube immediately go in the trash.


Dude, lighten up.  Unless it goes on all the time, then I don't blame you.
 
2014-04-15 01:48:35 PM  
Because I'm paid six figures to do so?
 
2014-04-15 02:14:15 PM  
I used to like making a loud noise in the cube room and watch people play prairie dog.
 
2014-04-15 02:23:59 PM  
We must do away with the absolutely specious notion that everybody has to earn a living. It is a fact today that one in ten thousand of us can make a technological breakthrough capable of supporting all the rest. The youth of today are absolutely right in recognizing this nonsense of earning a living. We keep inventing jobs because of this false idea that everybody has to be employed at some kind of drudgery because, according to Malthusian-Darwinian theory, he must justify his right to exist. So we have inspectors of inspectors and people making instruments for inspectors to inspect inspectors. The true business of people should be to go back to school and think about whatever it was they were thinking about before somebody came along and told them they had to earn a living.
 
2014-04-15 02:37:43 PM  

Deep Contact: I used to like making a loud noise in the cube room and watch people play prairie dog.


We used to "Ping Pong"  our good for nothing manager.  someone would ask him a question, and just as he'd finish up the answer someone on the other side of the aisle would ask another innoxious question and he'd trot over to pontificate about it, then someone on the other side would ask another question...the goal was to see how long we could bounce this idoit from cubicle to cubicle. One morning we kept the volley going for ove an hour.

 "Joel, is the food truck going to be here today?"

"Oh Joel, do you think I should delete this email from my friend?"

"Joel, why is our company called " ABC software?"


/good times.
 
2014-04-15 02:50:05 PM  

some_beer_drinker: when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.


Okay, how?
 
2014-04-15 03:00:21 PM  
Umm...yeah, cubicles don't make office workers unhappy. Going to a job 8-10 hours a day to bust your ass and being told not to expect raises, having your health care costs rise or even having health care completely dropped as a benefit, all while watching the company rake in record profits makes people unhappy. Why people stay for abuse is a mystery, but then I don't have a mortgage, kids, or any debt I could not pay off tomorrow.
 
2014-04-15 03:09:52 PM  

some_beer_drinker: We must do away with the absolutely specious notion that everybody has to earn a living. It is a fact today that one in ten thousand of us can make a technological breakthrough capable of supporting all the rest. The youth of today are absolutely right in recognizing this nonsense of earning a living. We keep inventing jobs because of this false idea that everybody has to be employed at some kind of drudgery because, according to Malthusian-Darwinian theory, he must justify his right to exist. So we have inspectors of inspectors and people making instruments for inspectors to inspect inspectors. The true business of people should be to go back to school and think about whatever it was they were thinking about before somebody came along and told them they had to earn a living.


Many people want to do the very bare minimum effort to survive. They are happy to do essentially nothing.

Most lazy-ass people who currently work a miserable job are not latent Michelangelos, lacking only the educational and philosophical opportunity for their creativity to blossom.

Even as a libby libtard, I reject your position and am very happy that your vision is not shared by the majority. Having some degree of responsibility is important for EVERYONE. That is not limited to the responsibility to do whatever it is you feel like dabbling in, accomplishing nothing.
 
2014-04-15 03:20:13 PM  

Danger Mouse: Deep Contact: I used to like making a loud noise in the cube room and watch people play prairie dog.

We used to "Ping Pong"  our good for nothing manager.  someone would ask him a question, and just as he'd finish up the answer someone on the other side of the aisle would ask another innoxious question and he'd trot over to pontificate about it, then someone on the other side would ask another question...the goal was to see how long we could bounce this idoit from cubicle to cubicle. One morning we kept the volley going for ove an hour.

 "Joel, is the food truck going to be here today?"

"Oh Joel, do you think I should delete this email from my friend?"

"Joel, why is our company called " ABC software?"


/good times.


I think all the managers at my company do that to each other and use meeting rooms to do it.  I guess it works out better, but I haven't seen the budget for what they're paying those guys.
 
2014-04-15 03:25:50 PM  

Pangea: some_beer_drinker: We must do away with the absolutely specious notion that everybody has to earn a living. It is a fact today that one in ten thousand of us can make a technological breakthrough capable of supporting all the rest. The youth of today are absolutely right in recognizing this nonsense of earning a living. We keep inventing jobs because of this false idea that everybody has to be employed at some kind of drudgery because, according to Malthusian-Darwinian theory, he must justify his right to exist. So we have inspectors of inspectors and people making instruments for inspectors to inspect inspectors. The true business of people should be to go back to school and think about whatever it was they were thinking about before somebody came along and told them they had to earn a living.

Many people want to do the very bare minimum effort to survive. They are happy to do essentially nothing.

Most lazy-ass people who currently work a miserable job are not latent Michelangelos, lacking only the educational and philosophical opportunity for their creativity to blossom.

Even as a libby libtard, I reject your position and am very happy that your vision is not shared by the majority. Having some degree of responsibility is important for EVERYONE. That is not limited to the responsibility to do whatever it is you feel like dabbling in, accomplishing nothing.


Actaully it's a quote from Buckminster Fuller (the geodesic dome guy).  I don't necessarly agree with the quote above either, as  idon't think a system like the one he describes would be sustainable. It's not human nature.
 
2014-04-15 04:07:46 PM  
I prefer the bullpen style assuming the others around me are other engineers on my team as I think it helps promote collaboration and builds a sense of team. I don't really mind cubes either. Offices I found made people especially disconnected from their coworkers which can be bad during crunch time. I find it's a lot easier for people to snap at one another when they don't see them as people and teammates
 
2014-04-15 04:13:15 PM  

DrPainMD: some_beer_drinker: when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.

And then what? The jobs that are done in cubicles will still need to be done.


I know it's off topic, but is your handle a Proud Family reference?

img2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-04-15 04:34:27 PM  

some_beer_drinker: We must do away with the absolutely specious notion that everybody has to earn a living. It is a fact today that one in ten thousand of us can make a technological breakthrough capable of supporting all the rest. The youth of today are absolutely right in recognizing this nonsense of earning a living. We keep inventing jobs because of this false idea that everybody has to be employed at some kind of drudgery because, according to Malthusian-Darwinian theory, he must justify his right to exist. So we have inspectors of inspectors and people making instruments for inspectors to inspect inspectors. The true business of people should be to go back to school and think about whatever it was they were thinking about before somebody came along and told them they had to earn a living.


It seems to me that a society like this would be even more rampant with crime and drug addicts than what we have now. Idle hands do the devil's work, and all that. While I think some folks could handle permanent loafing, I suspect most folks would suffer.
 
2014-04-15 06:59:54 PM  

hubiestubert: OK, this was a great "office" to work from. The view from the Comerica Club in Phoenix...

Yeah, I'd rather have the space to do my thing, than be walled up in an office.


I agree 100% that your life looks awesome!   But then, my guess is you're an extroverted multi-tasker who's good at focusing.  My husband and I, on the other hand, need to be in offices, but for different reasons.

He: is an introvert and works from home, walled up in a very small area of our house all day.  Has the place decorated the way he wants it, and is happy as a clam that no one else sees it (or him).

Me: extrovert but ADD and not a multi-tasker.  Thus, I need to go to an office to chat with people and have discussions, but (a) the most productive and interesting discussions usually happen behind closed office doors, with only one or two other people where I am not trying to keep track of multiple conversations and reactions, and (b) I can't get real work done unless I shut my office door and focus on only one thing.

If my husband tried to be a chef, he'd end up killing someone on the first day, and I'd lose track of what I was doing and end up killing myself.  It's best for everyone if we stay "walled up."

In my field, which is heavily not-for-profit, the open-office plan was tried back in the 90's, on everyone (including senior staff and PhD-level researchers).  It was clear that it was done for no reason other than to save money, and the backlash was tremendous. Now, pretty much anyone above the analyst level always gets a real office.
 
2014-04-15 10:29:02 PM  

FTDA: DrPainMD: some_beer_drinker: when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.

And then what? The jobs that are done in cubicles will still need to be done.

I know it's off topic, but is your handle a Proud Family reference?

[img2.wikia.nocookie.net image 640x480]


Never heard of Proud Family. I stole the handle from somebody on a Halo gaming site.
 
2014-04-15 10:58:43 PM  

Snakeophelia: hubiestubert: OK, this was a great "office" to work from. The view from the Comerica Club in Phoenix...

Yeah, I'd rather have the space to do my thing, than be walled up in an office.

I agree 100% that your life looks awesome!   But then, my guess is you're an extroverted multi-tasker who's good at focusing.  My husband and I, on the other hand, need to be in offices, but for different reasons.

He: is an introvert and works from home, walled up in a very small area of our house all day.  Has the place decorated the way he wants it, and is happy as a clam that no one else sees it (or him).

Me: extrovert but ADD and not a multi-tasker.  Thus, I need to go to an office to chat with people and have discussions, but (a) the most productive and interesting discussions usually happen behind closed office doors, with only one or two other people where I am not trying to keep track of multiple conversations and reactions, and (b) I can't get real work done unless I shut my office door and focus on only one thing.

If my husband tried to be a chef, he'd end up killing someone on the first day, and I'd lose track of what I was doing and end up killing myself.  It's best for everyone if we stay "walled up."

In my field, which is heavily not-for-profit, the open-office plan was tried back in the 90's, on everyone (including senior staff and PhD-level researchers).  It was clear that it was done for no reason other than to save money, and the backlash was tremendous. Now, pretty much anyone above the analyst level always gets a real office.


A chef has to be a multi-tasker. There is an old saw about a line cook needs to be looking ahead a few hours down the line, a sous chef needs to be looking a few days down the line, and a chef...well, they're lucky if they are up to speed on what's happening right now, but when you're managing a kitchen, and actually working on that line as well, you need to be both IN the moment, AND able to detach a bit and plan out the month, as well as the next week in detail. It's a weird tightrope, but it's fun as Hells.
 
2014-04-16 02:25:21 AM  

Guuberre: I'm sitting there one afternoon talking to a co-worker (she was facing me with her back to the break room) when someone else walked into the break room and farted. LOUDLY. It resonated. People have no awareness of their surroundings.
/CSB


Hell, some people I know...me included...would have done that on purpose.  Cropdusting is fun and all, but sometimes you just want to stop all productivity by blowing everybody out of their seats.
 
2014-04-16 01:21:15 PM  

stratagos: some_beer_drinker: when the fark will you sheep revolt, and take our gold back from the rich fat cats who are laughing at us? for farks sake...it it is way way past time.

You first


I am so taking his tape dispenser when he gets up.
 
Displayed 171 of 171 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report