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(MMGM)   The Great Atari Landfill Expedition, intended to dig up thousands of copies of the worst video game ever made, will begin on April 26. This would be a good time to leave New Mexico. Actually, it's always a good time to leave New Mexico   ( mmgn.com) divider line
    More: Followup, Atari, Atari video game burial, ROM cartridge, Zak Penn, landfills  
•       •       •

12281 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Apr 2014 at 9:47 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-14 01:10:07 PM  

special20: All I ever used the Atari 2500 for was to CG over video.
My weapon of choice was the most venerable Commodore 64. Favorite game on that was Red Storm Rising.



I hated the TASMs.  They always seemed to get shot down on the targets that needed it most.  A Udaloy?  No problem, TASM always got through.  The KIEV?  Nope, shoot-down, shoot-down, shoot-down.
 
2014-04-14 01:11:57 PM  
One of my RCT creations...

www.lunatim.com
 
2014-04-14 01:13:36 PM  
And a Mona Lisa I did in flowers in RCT2...

www.lunatim.com
 
2014-04-14 01:15:18 PM  

Kinetic King: Remember Simon? That was in a class of it's own because it had colored buttons that lit up. It would light up the buttons in a random order and then you'd have to press the buttons in the same order--it got dull after about 10 minutes.


My friend and I would have competitions on Simon, but I was never very good. A similar game was Major Morgan, that looked kinda like a brick cellphone but had these red and clear membrane buttons. You could slide a "game card" over them to play different games.
 
2014-04-14 01:15:52 PM  

TappingTheVein: Careful not to dig up this guy:
[d2nh4f9cbhlobh.cloudfront.net image 427x632]


Holy shiat I didn't think anyone else had seen that movie.
 
2014-04-14 01:17:14 PM  

Kinetic King: One of my RCT creations...


R'lyeh, the non-Euclidean architecture of which to drive one mad ...
 
2014-04-14 01:17:24 PM  
And two more images.  Maybe these will get the crummy ET graphics out of your head, folks...
www.lunatim.com
www.lunatim.com
 
2014-04-14 01:19:22 PM  

Kinetic King: And two more images. Maybe these will get the crummy ET graphics out of your head, folks...


Wow. That's dedication.
 
2014-04-14 01:19:33 PM  

theorellior: Kinetic King: Remember Simon? That was in a class of it's own because it had colored buttons that lit up. It would light up the buttons in a random order and then you'd have to press the buttons in the same order--it got dull after about 10 minutes.

My friend and I would have competitions on Simon, but I was never very good. A similar game was Major Morgan, that looked kinda like a brick cellphone but had these red and clear membrane buttons. You could slide a "game card" over them to play different games.


I don't recall Major Morgan, but I would have thought the game card gimmick was pretty neat at the time...
 
2014-04-14 01:22:56 PM  
260 comments and not one "Leave the Bronx for Enchanting New Mexico" references?

img3.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-04-14 01:24:07 PM  

theorellior: Kinetic King: And two more images. Maybe these will get the crummy ET graphics out of your head, folks...

Wow. That's dedication.


Thanks, theorellior!  Yeah, I was a power player when it came to sim games.  But, really, I doubt that I spent more time playing computer games than other people spent watching television, so it's not as pathetic as it first appears.  I even tried to convince the various makers makers of RCT (Microprose, Hasbro, Atari) to hire me as a scenario designer, but Chris Sawyer's own agents told me to not waste my time because the video-game industry is run like a sweatshop...
 
2014-04-14 01:26:22 PM  

theorellior: Everyone hates ET, but then there's this guy, who learned how to hack Atari code and then tried to fix the gameplay problems as a challenge.


Now that was pretty cool. I haven't seen low level assy code for a long time and seeing how he hacked the fixes was interesting. All the comments about clock cycles, how many byes needed and saved and what was wrong. Brought back some memories from my C-64 days.

This is something few programmers today even think about.

I remember my experiences with trying to convert Blue Max on a C-64 from a cassette loader to disk and used a disassembler to track it. The code was all over the place and I eventually found a warning to us "pirates" about how he worked hard on the code and did not like us stealing it.

/good times
 
2014-04-14 01:28:03 PM  
3.bp.blogspot.com
Here we are, live at the scene of this historic event. We should be coming across thousands of E.T. cartridges any moment now...
 
2014-04-14 01:29:54 PM  
24.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-04-14 01:30:33 PM  
Anybody else remember Missile Command?  IIRC, the Atari 2600 version was almost as good as the arcade version.  It was a very grim game in which you tried to prevent six cities from getting nuked by firing anti-missile missiles at incoming ICBMs.  But what would you expect of a video game that came out while the Cold War was still raging?
 
2014-04-14 01:31:36 PM  

CruJones: I feel like playing Combat and bouncing some white shells off walls and killing your tank.


I liked that game; we found that if you slid the tanks right up against one of the internal walls and then 'twitched' it towards the wall, the program would whirl the tank around the corner. If it was hit while whirling, the tank would then keep whirling all across the map.
 
2014-04-14 01:33:23 PM  

saturn badger: Now that was pretty cool. I haven't seen low level assy code for a long time and seeing how he hacked the fixes was interesting. All the comments about clock cycles, how many byes needed and saved and what was wrong. Brought back some memories from my C-64 days.


Yeah, I'm not a coder but I've done some dabbling, so I was able to get the gist of what he was doing. Pretty crazy to think that you had to squeeze every clock cycle and byte available to you. That kind of coding has gone the way of the dodo. With gigahertz and gigabytes to play with you can just throw more and more lines of mishmash at a problem until something sticks.
 
2014-04-14 01:34:03 PM  

special20: All I ever used the Atari 2500 for was to CG over video.
My weapon of choice was the most venerable Commodore 64. Favorite game on that was Red Storm Rising.


I loved that game. Played it via a emulator a few years back, still excellent gameplay.
 
2014-04-14 01:34:42 PM  
Some reports indicate that the stuff buried was mostly stuff other than ET cartridges, like broken consoles returned under warranty.  It'll be interesting what they actually find.
 
2014-04-14 01:35:28 PM  

Harry Freakstorm: I have a Game.con handheld game on the shelf in the closet.  Within that evil device is the worst game ever made: "Batman and Robin".


I think I had the C64 version of that game.  It was indeed horrible and pointless.
 
2014-04-14 01:39:34 PM  

Atomic Jonb: special20: All I ever used the Atari 2500 for was to CG over video.
My weapon of choice was the most venerable Commodore 64. Favorite game on that was Red Storm Rising.


I hated the TASMs.  They always seemed to get shot down on the targets that needed it most.  A Udaloy?  No problem, TASM always got through.  The KIEV?  Nope, shoot-down, shoot-down, shoot-down.


I loved the higher level settings, where you had to match sonar patterns to the manual to identify ship class.

I loved the hunt the boomer mission, which rapidly turned into a knife fight range game that made you sweat.
 
2014-04-14 01:40:04 PM  

Kinetic King: But, really, I doubt that I spent more time playing computer games than other people spent watching television, so it's not as pathetic as it first appears.


It's not pathetic, at least not to me. I know a loose gang of people who come from all walks of life and they are all obsessed with Sims modding. Some of the stuff they produce is incredible. And I've been known to create fictional worlds all the way down to the plate tectonics, so no worries here.
 
2014-04-14 01:43:43 PM  
Back in the early 80s, my brother and I had a Timex-Sinclair 80 computer.  It cost something like $30, had 44 by 64 pixel graphics, and you really couldn't do much with the 2k of RAM.  In spite of that, I used it to do a problem in heat transfer for a college class that used finite element mathematics.  I also had one game with it, Conway's Game of Life.  The Game of Life was the only app that even made the TS 80 worth playing, and got me interested in cellular automata.  I'm surprised that nobody has come up with a best-selling game that uses cellular automata yet...
 
2014-04-14 01:43:54 PM  

ApocoLypstick: most people here are decent hard working folks. ... The work ethic is laughable.


Which is it?
 
2014-04-14 01:43:59 PM  

Orgasmatron138: Kougsy: I know it isn't Atari but Superman 64 has to be the worst game ever made.

I just got physically ill thinking about it.

Forgot about that one. Thanks, jerk.

/and you're right


You guys are mixing it up with the Nintendo Superman 64.

Superman for the VCS (2600) was actually a fun game.
 
2014-04-14 01:47:01 PM  

theorellior: Kinetic King: Remember Simon? That was in a class of it's own because it had colored buttons that lit up. It would light up the buttons in a random order and then you'd have to press the buttons in the same order--it got dull after about 10 minutes.

My friend and I would have competitions on Simon, but I was never very good. A similar game was Major Morgan, that looked kinda like a brick cellphone but had these red and clear membrane buttons. You could slide a "game card" over them to play different games.


Major Morgan?  Sounds like a rebranded Merlin:

img689.imageshack.us
 
2014-04-14 01:47:08 PM  
Kinetic King:  I'm surprised that nobody has come up with a best-selling game that uses cellular automata yet...

Obviously you haven't played Mathematica
 
2014-04-14 01:50:09 PM  
I saw all I ever needed to see of that E.T. game when I watched a video of a guy playing it while high on painkillers after having his wisdom teeth removed.

The Spoony Experiment (NSFW language)
 
2014-04-14 01:50:22 PM  

theorellior: Kinetic King: But, really, I doubt that I spent more time playing computer games than other people spent watching television, so it's not as pathetic as it first appears.

It's not pathetic, at least not to me. I know a loose gang of people who come from all walks of life and they are all obsessed with Sims modding. Some of the stuff they produce is incredible. And I've been known to create fictional worlds all the way down to the plate tectonics, so no worries here.


Thanks for understanding.  I do think that computer games, even first-person shooters, are better than TV because they're interactive instead of passive.  And simulation games really expand peoples' minds, especially with things like Sims modding where you create your own game play.

What I think is weird is how simulation games seem to take a back seat to adventure/war/shooter games.  The gaming industry seems oblivious to the fact that SimCity and Roller Coaster Tycoon were the top-selling games ever when they game out.  And the Civ series seems to kick butt as well.

Weird anecdote:  the local paper, the Pioneer Press, had a video-game reviewer for a while.  He had a totally shreddin' punk hair style and while he concentrated on adventure/war/shooter games, he seemed almost hard-headedly oblivious to the sim games like RCT that were smashing sales records.  Turns out, he's Vox Day, one of the pundits over at Conservapedia.  It figures...
 
2014-04-14 01:53:58 PM  
I'll just leave this here

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-04-14 02:03:48 PM  

shineyviper: Major Morgan? Sounds like a rebranded Merlin:


Crap. It was a Merlin. Major Morgan was a hand-held synth game.
 
2014-04-14 02:16:26 PM  

Kinetic King: And two more images.  Maybe these will get the crummy ET graphics out of your head, folks...
[www.lunatim.com image 640x480]
[www.lunatim.com image 750x500]


You know how we all know you have no life?

/you smell like basement
 
2014-04-14 02:16:53 PM  

MooseUpNorth: SuperChuck: I don't understand how Pac Man can be a letdown. It's about as simple as a game can get. What was wrong with it?

Pretty good:
[media2.picsearch.com image 183x240]
Sound: [wakka-wakka-wakka]

Very meh:
[www.consoleclassix.com image 256x224]Sound: [punk punk pupunk]
Unbelievably irritating:
[media3.picsearch.com image 229x231]
Sound: [pew! pEW! PEW! PEW! Pew! pEW! PEW! Pew! pEW!"


Left out the runt of the litter...

zone.bomberoza.net
 
2014-04-14 02:28:38 PM  

incrdbil: Atomic Jonb: special20: All I ever used the Atari 2500 for was to CG over video.
My weapon of choice was the most venerable Commodore 64. Favorite game on that was Red Storm Rising.

I loved the higher level settings, where you had to match sonar patterns to the manual to identify ship class.

I loved the hunt the boomer mission, which rapidly turned into a knife fight range game that made you sweat.


Nothing like firing torpedos blindly down the heading the incoming torps are coming from, and then trying to dodge multiple torpedos at once.  I could usually handle two (with decoys and noisemakers) but 3 or more, and I was farked.  But at that point, if your weren't at max depth, you were cavitating so everyone would just pile-on.

Just the memories make me twitchy.
 
2014-04-14 02:37:13 PM  

MycroftHolmes: I'll just leave this here

[3.bp.blogspot.com image 520x501]



I played the heck out of Elite on my C-64 in the late 80's.  There may have been a larger point to the game, but all I did was hop from planet to planet trading in drugs and slaves to build up my ship's weapons and defenses.  I loved the dogfighting aspect of that game, and absolutely HATED manually docking with the space stations.  I also hated that once in a while your ship would crash even with an automatic docking device.  I know it happened to me once or twice.

I remember when my cousin got ET for her 2600.  I bet I played it all of 5 minutes.  Same with Pac-Man.  When I was in 5th grade in 1982 I got an Intellivision for Christmas (still probably the best gift I ever received) and I was the hit of the neighborhood.  Space Battle, Space Armada, Astro Smash, Utopia, Night Stalker, Micro Surgeon, Armor Battle, Pitfall, you name it.  I loved those games.  Then in 1984 my friend got a Coleco Vision and we all sat around playing Pole Position nonstop and forgot about the previous consoles.  The Atari 5200 was in there somewhere as well.  In 1986 I upgraded to a C-64 and did nothing but play games on it until around 1990 or so.  It was weird how consoles and platforms just appeared and the previous ones were left behind.  I remember when Intellivsion came out, and immediately it was uncool to have an Atari.  Even the Atari 5200 didn't seem to help.  And Intellivision was replaced just as quickly.

It was amazing how fast things went.  In 1980 or so the Atari 2600 was out of this world.  By 1984 or so, even with much better consoles in the market, the whole thing was just gone it seemed.  Even with all the cool C-64 games I had, and all the hours I spent with my friends playing Wizardry and Kings Quest on their PC jr, those post-crash years seemed bleak.

One of my regrets from back then is that I never tinkered with the C-64, other than to play games.  From what I've read in later years it was a pretty versatile computer that was capable of quite a bit.
 
2014-04-14 02:41:58 PM  

gweilo8888: Kinetic King: And two more images.  Maybe these will get the crummy ET graphics out of your head, folks...
[www.lunatim.com image 640x480]
[www.lunatim.com image 750x500]

You know how we all know you have no life?

/you smell like basement


No, it's just that I probably don't waste as much time on Fark or watching TV as you do.  Also, I'm flying to Munich in two days to make a giant stick bomb for German TV--I'll make enough in a week of work to goof off for the next two months...
 
2014-04-14 02:46:01 PM  
I remember finishing the game probably a dozen times or so. Which means probably a couple of hundred failures. For me, it was the first video game that actually had an endpoint, instead of simply repeating the last level over and over. (Or the second level, for the Atari Donkey Kong port.) After spending countless hours rolling the score over on other games, it was a refreshing change of pace to know that I could sit down and finish a game, one way or another, inside of half an hour. Sure, the controls were frustrating, and the randomness of the FBI/scientist showing up to take part of the phone just seconds before the mothership arrived was the height of frustration, but it's not like it took forever to get to that point, either.
 
Oak
2014-04-14 02:49:12 PM  

Ambitwistor: Kinetic King: One of my RCT creations...

R'lyeh, the non-Euclidean architecture of which to drive one mad ...

Ph'nglui mglw'nafh E.T. Alamogordo wgah'nagl fhtagn

 
2014-04-14 02:49:16 PM  

Loan Starr: One of my regrets from back then is that I never tinkered with the C-64, other than to play games. From what I've read in later years it was a pretty versatile computer that was capable of quite a bit.


I programmed the heck out of my C-64 in basic.  Never got into the more advanced languages (assembler made my head hurt), and the difficulty in programming hi-res graphics were pretty much limited me to basic.  I do regret not sticking with programming.  Of course I was in maybe 6th grade at the time.
 
2014-04-14 02:49:41 PM  

Man On Pink Corner: Kinetic King:  I'm surprised that nobody has come up with a best-selling game that uses cellular automata yet...

Obviously you haven't played Mathematica


I've vaguely heard of Mathematica, but never realized that you could do cellular automata on it.  One of my abandoned projects was to design a smartphone app game called G'Rabbit using CA--I decided that it was too dull.  Besides, I have an idea for a kinetic-art toy that might be patentable that I'm working on when I return from my Germany trip...
 
2014-04-14 02:52:43 PM  

theorellior: Kinetic King: Remember Simon? That was in a class of it's own because it had colored buttons that lit up. It would light up the buttons in a random order and then you'd have to press the buttons in the same order--it got dull after about 10 minutes.

My friend and I would have competitions on Simon, but I was never very good. A similar game was Major Morgan, that looked kinda like a brick cellphone but had these red and clear membrane buttons. You could slide a "game card" over them to play different games.


I remeber MErlin which sounds like your description.


upload.wikimedia.org

Also wasted a lot of time with the below.


www.campx.ca
 
2014-04-14 02:53:05 PM  

BalugaJoe: Atomic Jonb: IIRC, Raiders of the Lost Ark had a really bad Atari game also.

And yes, let ET stay buried.

It was impossible to win.


I remember beating it.  You just had to find all the parts of the phone and then, if I remember you get Elliot to help you call your spaceship and get in.

It was farking boring though.
 
2014-04-14 02:59:46 PM  
I had one of these. It may still be around here somewhere, too.

bimg1.mlstatic.com
And of course I had a bunch of other LCD games from the late 70s and early 80s. Simon, Merlin, Football, Baseball, Mario's Cement Factory, Vanguard, etc.

I've also had Pong, Atari 2600, Atari 7800, Intellivision 2, Colecovision, Odyssey2, Vectrex, Commodore 64, Commodore 128, Amiga 600, Radio Shack Color Computer, TRS-80, TI-99/4A, Timex Sinclair (admitedly awful for games), Sega Master System, TurboGrafx-16, TurboGrafx-CD, TurboDuo, 3DO, NES, NES top-loader, SNES, Genesis, Genesis II (redesigned Genesis), 32X, Dreamcast, Game Boy, Game Boy Color, Game Boy Pocket, Sega CD, Game Boy Light, Wonderswan, Game Boy Advance, GBA SP, Game Boy Micro, Sega Nomad, TurboExpress, Sega GameGear, Atari Lynx, Atari Jaguar, Virtual Boy, Saturn, Playstation, PSOne, PS2 (all versions), PS3 (launch and redesign), Xbox, Xbox 360 (launch & slim), Dingoo A320, Ouya, GameCube, N64, Wii, Wii-U, and a few others I'm forgetting, as well as various PC gaming rigs I built.

I sold most of them a while ago. I currently only use the Xbox 360, PC, and Dingoo, as well as my tablet and phone.

My favorite handhelds:
* TurboExpress - It played the same HuCards as the console! At the time that was awesome.
* GBA SP - Perfect balance of great library, fun games, compact size, and excellent screen.
* Dingoo A-320 - Emulation paradise for old-school games.

My least-favorite handhelds:
* Sega Nomad - Battery hog. Wouldn't last two hours on fresh batteries.
* Original GBA - AWFUL dark screen, bad form factor, no backlight/frontlight.
* Wonderswan - There was nothing to play on it.

My favorite consoles:
* Atari 2600 - The first system I owned that played multiple games. Pong sucked, and this was a huge improvement. I played the hell out of it.
* Commodore 64 - There was no videogame crash. C64 players were rocking through the 80s with awesome games that made the NES look like crap.
* TurboGrafx-CD - There were some excellent games on the TurboGrafx, and the CD was the first on the market, which gave them some LONG games with great music before anyone else.
* 3DO - Amazing games for the time. Worth it just for the re-released and upgraded Star Control 2.
* PS2 - Amazing library. Truly Sony's best console to date.
* Xbox 360 - I liked my PS3, too, but I've always been partial to the 360's controller and menus.
* Odyssey2 - It was a third-rate console, I know... But Quest For The Rings and KC Munchkin were FUN!
* SNES & Genesis - Together, they made a complete library of great games. I'm glad I had both.

My least favorite consoles:
* Atari Jaguar - Waste of money. Bad games. Awful controller. No support.
* Radio Shack Color Computer - All the expense of the C64, without any of the games!
* Ouya - Severe disappointment. Under-powered and has lots of shiatty games. Controller sucks, too.
* Virtual Boy - Thanks for giving me myopia and headaches, Nintendo, you assholes.
* Sega Saturn - Sub-par games, small library, total disappointment next to its competition.
* Pong - Even in the 70s it was dull. When I finally got my Atari 2600 and a copy of Space Invaders, I never looked at Pong again.
* N64 - I know some of you have warm fuzzy memories of it, but to me it was an outdated system with cartridges in an area of DVDs and that limited the experience severely. It has very few decent games and their release schedule was SLOW. Even the games people claim to love are kind of sucky. WWF No Mercy is not as good as you remember. GoldenEye was crap compared to the stuff on other consoles and computers at the time. This was the beginning of Nintendo losing their edge.
 
2014-04-14 03:00:59 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-04-14 03:03:54 PM  

under a mountain: theorellior: Kinetic King: Remember Simon? That was in a class of it's own because it had colored buttons that lit up. It would light up the buttons in a random order and then you'd have to press the buttons in the same order--it got dull after about 10 minutes.
My friend and I would have competitions on Simon, but I was never very good. A similar game was Major Morgan, that looked kinda like a brick cellphone but had these red and clear membrane buttons. You could slide a "game card" over them to play different games.
I remeber MErlin which sounds like your description.
[upload.wikimedia.org image 850x726]
Also wasted a lot of time with the below.
[www.campx.ca image 819x833]


Merlin was awesome - and indestructible.

I had several of the Quiz Wiz books/cartridges, but the snarky 8-track glory of 2XL was much more fun.

retrothing.typepad.com
 
2014-04-14 03:05:15 PM  

Kinetic King: No, it's just that I probably don't waste as much time on Fark or watching TV as you do.


Whatever you'd like us to believe.

/all told, I probably spend about 15 minutes a day on Fark. Possibly less. And I don't watch TV at all, other than one show -- can't stand reality TV, which is what 99.9% of it consists of nowadays. I watch some old movies and TV shows occasionally, but not unduly so.
 
2014-04-14 03:08:30 PM  

Stephen_Falken: [img.fark.net image 600x450]


I'm old enough to remember playing the text version of Oregon Trail.  Yup, played over a teletypewriter connected to a mainframe with an acoustic coupler the size of a shoebox.  When you went to shoot Indians (these were less PC times), you had to type in B-A-N-G as quickly as possible.  And I wore an onion in my belt which was the fashion at the time...
 
2014-04-14 03:08:49 PM  

Random Anonymous Blackmail: Pac-Man for Atari pissed me off, I was expecting something similar to well Pac-Man not what ever the hell they shipped.


Here's an albeit-verbal earworm for you:  Boo-Dee-Boo-Dee.  Momp-Momp- Momp- Momp- Momp- Momp- Momp- Momp- Momp- Momp- Momp- Momp- Momp...

/Hated Atari Pac-Man
//Even Kool-Aid Man was better
 
2014-04-14 03:12:23 PM  

Satanic_Hamster: Well, there's also always been issues with recycling anything that's considered intellectual property.


I'm not sure "ET the Video Game can be referred to as Intellectual anything.

/Intellectual Wasteland perhaps?
 
2014-04-14 03:13:45 PM  

MycroftHolmes: Loan Starr: One of my regrets from back then is that I never tinkered with the C-64, other than to play games. From what I've read in later years it was a pretty versatile computer that was capable of quite a bit.

I programmed the heck out of my C-64 in basic.  Never got into the more advanced languages (assembler made my head hurt), and the difficulty in programming hi-res graphics were pretty much limited me to basic.  I do regret not sticking with programming.  Of course I was in maybe 6th grade at the time.


There was a magazine called "Run" back then that had code the reader could use to program the C64.  I learned quite a bit, but still mostly played games.   I was also in about 5th or 6th grade at the time.   I later went on to learn how to do some programming in college and I think those early experiences helped make it less intimidating.  I enjoy programming, but never thought to make it my career.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RUN_%28magazine%29
 
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