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(Sun Sentinel)   Highly paid female informant may soon have her identity unmasked thanks to a court order   (sun-sentinel.com) divider line 57
    More: Florida, Palm Beach County News, identity  
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12097 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Apr 2014 at 7:15 AM (32 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-13 07:21:31 AM  
On one hand, I can see the police needing confidential informants to catch drug smugglers.

On the other hand, how can one adequately defend themselves against anonymous accusers or confidential informants?
 
2014-04-13 07:23:37 AM  
After reading the article, this bit stood out

In a private hearing with Judge Bober sometime last year, the lady informant told him that she "had a vague memory as to how much she earned" and that she relied on police to decide how much to compensate her, he wrote in his decision.

So, she got a cut of whatever the police seized, and relied on them to get said cut. That system is all kinds of farked up.
 
2014-04-13 07:33:12 AM  

veale728: On one hand, I can see the police needing confidential informants to catch drug smugglers.

On the other hand, how can one adequately defend themselves against anonymous accusers or confidential informants?


It doesn't sound like her testimony was needed to get the convictions.  She brings them in and the cops do the deal.  The deal itself is the illegal activity.  She's pretty much irrelevant to the arrest/charges/conviction.
 
2014-04-13 07:34:09 AM  
Show the nipples.
 
2014-04-13 07:35:39 AM  
FTFA: For years, a sexy brunette posed as a Colombian cocaine supplier, helping Sunrise Police draw dozens of faraway drug buyers to town in a recurring dragnet that enabled her to live comfortably - and secretly - as a professional informant.
Her closely guarded anonymity now may be nearing an end.

 
If the buyers didn't know who she was before, they certainly do now.  Seriously?  Location, hair color, probable build, lifestyle, employment...why even bother keeping her name a secret after all that?

Good job guys.
 
2014-04-13 07:40:43 AM  

Emposter: FTFA: For years, a sexy brunette posed as a Colombian cocaine supplier, helping Sunrise Police draw dozens of faraway drug buyers to town in a recurring dragnet that enabled her to live comfortably - and secretly - as a professional informant.
Her closely guarded anonymity now may be nearing an end.

If the buyers didn't know who she was before, they certainly do now.  Seriously?  Location, hair color, probable build, lifestyle, employment...why even bother keeping her name a secret after all that?

Good job guys.


So, you think all the dealers she roped in don't remember what she looked like or details of her life they learned when they met her?  I'm sure every defense lawyer has a description of her and some probably have a professionally done sketch.
 
2014-04-13 07:41:49 AM  

veale728: On the other hand, how can one adequately defend themselves against anonymous accusers or confidential informants?


No need. Showing up in a parking lot and buying 2kgs of coke from the cops pretty much removes all reasonable doubt.
 
2014-04-13 07:44:13 AM  

Emposter: If the buyers didn't know who she was before, they certainly do now.  Seriously?  Location, hair color, probable build, lifestyle, employment...why even bother keeping her name a secret after all that?


She worked for Sunrise, FL. That doesn't mean she lives there. She could have easily commuted there to stage the drug deal in a parking lot, let the cops do their work, and drive for an hour home. Hell, if I were in that line of work, I wouldn't want people recognizing me at the neighborhood grocery store.
 
2014-04-13 07:45:21 AM  

jtown: veale728: On one hand, I can see the police needing confidential informants to catch drug smugglers.

On the other hand, how can one adequately defend themselves against anonymous accusers or confidential informants?

It doesn't sound like her testimony was needed to get the convictions.  She brings them in and the cops do the deal.  The deal itself is the illegal activity.  She's pretty much irrelevant to the arrest/charges/conviction.


But they're arguing entrapment, in which case knowing at the very least what was said is necessary.
 
2014-04-13 07:49:57 AM  
Is that what Valerie Plume is doing now?
 
2014-04-13 08:00:45 AM  

whitman00: Emposter: FTFA: For years, a sexy brunette posed as a Colombian cocaine supplier, helping Sunrise Police draw dozens of faraway drug buyers to town in a recurring dragnet that enabled her to live comfortably - and secretly - as a professional informant.
Her closely guarded anonymity now may be nearing an end.

If the buyers didn't know who she was before, they certainly do now.  Seriously?  Location, hair color, probable build, lifestyle, employment...why even bother keeping her name a secret after all that?

Good job guys.

So, you think all the dealers she roped in don't remember what she looked like or details of her life they learned when they met her?  I'm sure every defense lawyer has a description of her and some probably have a professionally done sketch.


Of course they remember what she looks like.  How is that relevant? If she didn't testify (and it doesn't sound like she did) they wouldn't know she was an informant.  That's the whole point of the confidential in confidential informant.

Hilary T. N. Seuss: Emposter: If the buyers didn't know who she was before, they certainly do now.  Seriously?  Location, hair color, probable build, lifestyle, employment...why even bother keeping her name a secret after all that?

She worked for Sunrise, FL. That doesn't mean she lives there. She could have easily commuted there to stage the drug deal in a parking lot, let the cops do their work, and drive for an hour home. Hell, if I were in that line of work, I wouldn't want people recognizing me at the neighborhood grocery store.


I fail to see how where she lives matters.  The drug dealers met her in Sunrise, not wherever she lives.
 
2014-04-13 08:08:27 AM  
Paging Carl Hiaasen. Mr. Carl Hiaasen.
 
2014-04-13 08:16:41 AM  
So...they used this person to help "import" dealers so they could bust them andvtake their cadh and cars right?

Okay..i get it now. Essentially, they used a hot chick to get people from other countries to come here so they can take their money.
 
2014-04-13 08:20:46 AM  
Good. Vice cops are the lowest form of life.
 
2014-04-13 08:22:41 AM  

The more you eat the more you fart: So...they used this person to help "import" dealers so they could bust them andvtake their cadh and cars right?

Okay..i get it now. Essentially, they used a hot chick to get people from other countries to come here so they can take their money.


There's a reason why police forces oppose drug legalization despite evidence it would reduce crime.

Two words: Cash. Cow.
 
2014-04-13 08:24:46 AM  
Sounds too much like entrapment. They were actively soliciting folks to break the law.

This woman was more than an informant

If drug dealers got smart...they would start recording these deals w police. Guarantee you law enforcement will end dealing knowing they are being recorded...that is a bigger risk to them than the drug dealer recording themselves
 
2014-04-13 08:30:43 AM  

FloridaFarkTag: Sounds too much like entrapment. They were actively soliciting folks to break the law.

This woman was more than an informant

If drug dealers got smart...they would start recording these deals w police. Guarantee you law enforcement will end dealing knowing they are being recorded...that is a bigger risk to them than the drug dealer recording themselves


Cops'll charge them with wiretapping then.
 
2014-04-13 08:35:37 AM  
They wouldn't want ME on that jury.

ANY amount of coersion to convince the drug dealers to come here as opposed to somewhere elsev= entrapment imo.
 
2014-04-13 08:37:29 AM  

FloridaFarkTag: Sounds too much like entrapment. They were actively soliciting folks to break the law.

This woman was more than an informant

If drug dealers got smart...they would start recording these deals w police. Guarantee you law enforcement will end dealing knowing they are being recorded...that is a bigger risk to them than the drug dealer recording themselves


Thats my opinion too.

She was no imformant. She was their salesperson who went and made deals to convince people to come to FL to sell drugs so the cops could take their cash.
 
2014-04-13 08:37:32 AM  
The armchair lawyer in me is pounding the table, shouting "ENTRAPMENT!"

Still.

Nice little earner.

i61.tinypic.com

// how long before she stars in an El Narco decapitation vid?
 
2014-04-13 08:41:23 AM  
I'm surprised she's still alive
 
2014-04-13 08:44:40 AM  
i.imgur.com

Seriously though fark snitches.
 
2014-04-13 08:44:59 AM  
So she got a cut from the money the cops stole from the dealers by ising this broad to convince them to sell drugs there.

She's already dead. You dont honestly think the traffickers aren't aware who she is right? They probably also know she took some of their money as payment.

The cops were literally acting as the mafia, and she was their setup. Only a matter of time for her imo.
 
2014-04-13 08:52:48 AM  
Drug Laws = revenue generating device
 
2014-04-13 09:04:19 AM  
These aren't traffickers, these are dickheads who think they can buy $160,000 worth of coke for $30,000. They're not connected or it would be them selling to her. It's important to note that in no time during this whole thing does anyone have any actual cocaine.
 
2014-04-13 09:09:49 AM  
snitches get riches?
 
2014-04-13 09:25:32 AM  

mccallcl: These aren't traffickers, these are dickheads who think they can buy $160,000 worth of coke for $30,000. They're not connected or it would be them selling to her. It's important to note that in no time during this whole thing does anyone have any actual cocaine.


This is why it's a cash cow and not actually a crime prevention.  They're not going after those supplying drugs, they're going after those that choose to take advantage of an opportunity presented by the informant, which is why her having to actually testify is needed.  Good job on the judge's part. Her testimony on how initial contact and arrangement of sales is vital to distinguish between her simply agreeing to those that were searching for coke, vs those that were convinced by her to make a quick buck (given the economy, this is likely predatory entrapment of desperate people).

I have the same view of cops that set up stings to bust johns by posing a vice cop as a prostitute to arrest people for solicitation, rather than the cops posing as Johns busting prostitutes and pimps?  It's completely bass ackwards to focus on punishing demand and not supply.
 
2014-04-13 09:46:01 AM  

jtown: It doesn't sound like her testimony was needed to get the convictions. She brings them in and the cops do the deal. The deal itself is the illegal activity. She's pretty much irrelevant to the arrest/charges/conviction.


Yeah.  There have been cases where a dirty snitch was a problem but in this case it doesn't sound like it would matter if she was dirty or not.
 
2014-04-13 09:46:43 AM  
I don't have a whole lot of sympathy for this particular informant, but I'm really worried what happens if it becomes case law that all anonymous informants have to be identified.  I live in Baltimore and we have had several cases where entire families have been killed because one member called the police to report drug dealers.  These were not professional informants making hundreds of thousands of dollars, these were normal people who called police and told them "there are a bunch of drug dealers selling in the alley behind my house, they are forcing my 10 year old grandson to hold drugs for them, please help us".  My city all ready has enough problems dealing with gangs and drug dealers without everyone who talks to the cops being afraid their name and address will be given to the gangs if the case goes to court.
 
2014-04-13 09:59:41 AM  
"Highly paid female informant may soon have her identity unmasked thanks to a court order."

Subby, you know how we can tell if it's a female?  The use of "her" later on, but I think you wrote it the way you did to solicit an emotional response based on the informant's sex.
 
2014-04-13 10:20:26 AM  
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-04-13 10:26:24 AM  
At best she will end up testifying in court exactly how much she was paid as an informant. Enter the IRS agent who will immediately inquire just how she can reconcile her testimony with her tax returns, providing that she filed any in the first place.
 
2014-04-13 10:26:45 AM  
I am sure not every case was entrapment. In this one she personally knew the defendant and targeted him with an offer to good to refuse.
 
2014-04-13 10:32:51 AM  
You all know the cunning plan of "think like a criminal to catch a criminal".
Welcome to the new and improved, "Be a criminal to catch a criminal".

So, here we are at the corner of "we are all criminals" and "it's a secret", for the children, of course.
 
2014-04-13 10:37:38 AM  
Pics or ........ no, wait. That would not be a good idea.
 
2014-04-13 10:45:26 AM  

bromah: I am sure not every case was entrapment. In this one she personally knew the defendant and targeted him with an offer to good to refuse.


Given how much she earned by luring people into her community so they could be arrested and have their money and vehicles confiscated it seems to me she and the cops have turned their relationship into something more professional and she should have to keep accurate records of every contact she has had with the buyers.  Complete recordings, chat records everything.
 
2014-04-13 10:51:23 AM  
ramblinwreck
"Highly paid female informant may soon have her identity unmasked thanks to a court order."

Subby, you know how we can tell if it's a female? The use of "her" later on, but I think you wrote it the way you did to solicit an emotional response based on the informant's sex.


Considering the linked article's headline starts with "highly paid lady informant.." and the article itself starts with "For years, a sexy brunette..", subby actually toned things down.
 
2014-04-13 11:02:16 AM  

BizarreMan: Given how much she earned by luring people into her community so they could be arrested and have their money and vehicles confiscated it seems to me she and the cops have turned their relationship into something more professional and she should have to keep accurate records of every contact she has had with the buyers. Complete recordings, chat records everything.


Something tells me that the IRS is going to have a field day with this.
 
2014-04-13 11:03:12 AM  

ThatGuyFromTheInternet: FloridaFarkTag: Sounds too much like entrapment. They were actively soliciting folks to break the law.

This woman was more than an informant

If drug dealers got smart...they would start recording these deals w police. Guarantee you law enforcement will end dealing knowing they are being recorded...that is a bigger risk to them than the drug dealer recording themselves

Cops'll charge them with wiretapping then.


Also its not entrapment. Entrapment is the government mailing some dude in montana a magazine, published by the government, offering nude videos, some featuring underage girls, every month for ten years then busting him when he finally orders one. Seriously. That was the case that set the standard. A defendant must prove but for the actions of the police he never would have engaged in a certain activity. Any drug dealer with so much as a possession charge in his past cant be 'entrapped' in a future drug deal.
 
2014-04-13 11:23:38 AM  

veale728: jtown: veale728: On one hand, I can see the police needing confidential informants to catch drug smugglers.

On the other hand, how can one adequately defend themselves against anonymous accusers or confidential informants?

It doesn't sound like her testimony was needed to get the convictions.  She brings them in and the cops do the deal.  The deal itself is the illegal activity.  She's pretty much irrelevant to the arrest/charges/conviction.

But they're arguing entrapment, in which case knowing at the very least what was said is necessary.


If it's entrapment.

FTFA: Kulik argued in the court document that the informant offered LaRocca about $200,000 worth of cocaine - eight kilos - at a bargain price: only $20,000 plus some personal property.
In her private chat with the judge, however, the informant denied reaching out to LaRocca first. She said he contacted her, wanting 100 kilos on credit, "which she allegedly denied and he came down to asking for two kilos on credit," the judge wrote. "She claimed that she told him to call back when he had money."


I honestly don't see the difference.  Even if the defendant is telling the truth, I don't see how that would be entrapment.

Either way, it's about time she got out of the business and left the state.  If a judge is even THINKING about leaving her ID swinging in the breeze another one will, until someone decides to out her.
 
2014-04-13 11:56:31 AM  

FullMetalPanda: Is that what Valerie Plume is doing now?


I was thinking my favorite, Hot Mess, Ms. Lohan.
 
2014-04-13 12:16:33 PM  
Amendment 6:  In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defence.

Sounds pretty clear to me.
 
2014-04-13 12:26:11 PM  
Can only imagine how many people want this woman dead.
 
2014-04-13 12:27:03 PM  

jtown: She brings them in and the cops do the deal. The deal itself is the illegal activity.


And this not entrapment, how exactly?

She's pretty much irrelevant to the arrest/charges/conviction.

Except as a witness to events.
 
2014-04-13 12:57:08 PM  

HK-MP5-SD: I don't have a whole lot of sympathy for this particular informant, but I'm really worried what happens if it becomes case law that all anonymous informants have to be identified.  I live in Baltimore and we have had several cases where entire families have been killed because one member called the police to report drug dealers.  These were not professional informants making hundreds of thousands of dollars, these were normal people who called police and told them "there are a bunch of drug dealers selling in the alley behind my house, they are forcing my 10 year old grandson to hold drugs for them, please help us".  My city all ready has enough problems dealing with gangs and drug dealers without everyone who talks to the cops being afraid their name and address will be given to the gangs if the case goes to court.


Yeah.  As far as I'm concerned snitches should only be callable if they were involved in the illegal act.  Those that merely report or set things up should remain secret.
 
2014-04-13 12:57:32 PM  

TheBigJerk: veale728: jtown: veale728: On one hand, I can see the police needing confidential informants to catch drug smugglers.

On the other hand, how can one adequately defend themselves against anonymous accusers or confidential informants?

It doesn't sound like her testimony was needed to get the convictions.  She brings them in and the cops do the deal.  The deal itself is the illegal activity.  She's pretty much irrelevant to the arrest/charges/conviction.

But they're arguing entrapment, in which case knowing at the very least what was said is necessary.

If it's entrapment.

FTFA: Kulik argued in the court document that the informant offered LaRocca about $200,000 worth of cocaine - eight kilos - at a bargain price: only $20,000 plus some personal property.
In her private chat with the judge, however, the informant denied reaching out to LaRocca first. She said he contacted her, wanting 100 kilos on credit, "which she allegedly denied and he came down to asking for two kilos on credit," the judge wrote. "She claimed that she told him to call back when he had money."

I honestly don't see the difference.  Even if the defendant is telling the truth, I don't see how that would be entrapment.

Either way, it's about time she got out of the business and left the state.  If a judge is even THINKING about leaving her ID swinging in the breeze another one will, until someone decides to out her.


The difference is how the offer was made.  If she calls him up and says "I hear you lost your job.  Why don't you come here and buy this cocaine.  It's worth 200K but I know you're broke so I'll sell it to you for 20K plus whatever else you can get me.  At the end of this you'll have 180K.", that's entrapment.  The police took a guy who wasn't trying to be a drug dealer and made him one.  If she just calls him up and says "I hear you lost your job.  I can make you some money, but you have to sell drugs to do it, are you willing to sell drugs?" then when he says yes, she reveals the details, that's not entrapment.  You have to get them to agree to the crime before you dazzle them with the cash.

I'm actually more inclined to believe entrapment here because her story is too outlandish.  A guy calls her and asks for 100 kilos on credit?  Seriously, he called and asked her for 2.5 million dollars worth of cocaine without any cash?  Maybe a kilo to prove he's good for it but 100 kilos? Why would he even ask  unless they already were doing that kind of business together?
 
2014-04-13 01:13:18 PM  

stuffy: Can only imagine how many people want this woman dead.


Aannd, you are sure it is a woman, because,,,?
 
2014-04-13 03:51:22 PM  
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-04-13 04:13:00 PM  

veale728: On one hand, I can see the police needing confidential informants to catch drug smugglers.

On the other hand, how can one adequately defend themselves against anonymous accusers or confidential informants?


Pretty much no need.
The cops show up, you have the drugs in your possession.
They charge you with possession.

Why does it matter HOW the drugs got there?
Buying from an informant vs buying from a real dealer?

Are they going to argue that they were JUST HELPING her out of a mess??
LOL
 
2014-04-13 04:14:09 PM  

flondrix: Amendment 6:  In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defence.

Sounds pretty clear to me.


Is the informant testifying?
Because if she isnt testifying, there really isnt a need.
 
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