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(Fark)   What are some good, creepy books? Not House of Leaves, I have that, just haven't read it yet   (fark.com) divider line 173
    More: Advice, web cache, House of Leaves  
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2454 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Apr 2014 at 2:56 AM (19 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-12 10:52:22 PM
Tim Cahill's Buried Dreams freaked me the fark out.
 
2014-04-12 10:53:50 PM
fc04.deviantart.net

The Great God Pan
The Yellow King
Salem's Lot
At the Mountains of Madness

and, by far the creepiest book I've ever seen (and I include ones bound in human skin):

The Romance of Lust
 
2014-04-12 10:57:57 PM
You wouldn't think the Victorians could write a novel so filthy that the words actually crawl off the pages and up onto your skin and leave you feeling like you should take a Silkwood shower, but they did.

It's content is only every sexual taboo ever being broken repeatedly by a main character who gets more action than Action Jackson, but the experience of reading it is certainly creepy.
 
2014-04-12 11:02:00 PM
I've been enjoying Joe Hill's NOS4A2 in audiobook form. It's one of the best Stephen King books that Stephen King didn't write.
 
2014-04-12 11:02:18 PM
Lazlo: Count Dracula is good.
 
2014-04-12 11:06:14 PM
I read absolute shiat on my Kindle, but J.A. Konrath (or Jack Kilborn, his penname) and Blake Crouch write perfectly good shlock for cheap.  You can usually pick up an electronic copy of their books for less than 2 bucks.

Of Konrath:  Afraid, Origin, and Horror Stories were fun reads.  Creepy but fast.
Of Crouch:  Pines

I was also a huge fan of Michael Collins "The Slab" - a story about a concrete floor in a house that somehow managed to be the most terrifying thing I've ever read.
 
2014-04-12 11:13:39 PM
Hey, asshole, read House of Leaves.
 
2014-04-12 11:15:17 PM
It's obvious, but I'll say it anyway. The works of Lovecraft. The Dunwich Horror and The Shadow Over Innsmouth both creeped me out.
 
2014-04-12 11:16:39 PM

kronicfeld: Hey, asshole, read House of Leaves.


You need to have a physical copy of that one. It doesn't work on audio or pdf.
 
2014-04-12 11:23:25 PM
The Haunting of Hill House
We Have Always Lived in the Castle

Both of the above are by Shirley Jackson


For straight forward creepy, practically anything by Bentley Little
 
2014-04-12 11:26:44 PM

kronicfeld: Hey, asshole, read House of Leaves.


Creepy book but I never finished it. I got lost somewhere and when I woke up after the fever dreams the book was gone
 
2014-04-12 11:45:46 PM
Contagious.

Infected is a weak part one.
 
2014-04-12 11:55:51 PM
www.godlikeproductions.com
 
2014-04-13 12:23:02 AM
Night Film, Marisha Pessl

We Need to Talk About Kevin, Lionel Shriver

A Good and Happy Child, Justin Evans

The Word Exchange, Alena Graedon
 
2014-04-13 12:42:04 AM
House of Leaves may be my favorite book.  I like reading it while listening to Poe's Haunted album.

/ba da ba ba...
 
2014-04-13 01:14:02 AM

RodneyToady: House of Leaves may be my favorite book.  I like reading it while listening to Poe's Haunted album.

/ba da ba ba...


I just wiki'd that; it's on my list. Thanks.
 
2014-04-13 01:55:24 AM
House of Leaves had an interesting premise, and was certainly creative when it came to conveying the story on paper.  But the writing wasn't actually all that good. Equivalent to most low budget indie art films.
 
2014-04-13 02:53:22 AM
Waiting Period by Hughbert Selby Jr. is decent
The Lost or The Girl Next Door by Jack Ketchum might work
The Dwarf by Par Lagerkvist ain't bad
The Rising -> City of the Dead -> Dead Seatrifecta by Brian Keene is pretty good, too
 
2014-04-13 02:59:26 AM
The Bible.
 
2014-04-13 03:09:11 AM
I like to think I'm a tough guy, been shot twice, have a nasty scar on my forearm from when a guy pulled a knife on me so I took the cut in order to close with him and break his nose, I hike the Appalachian trail as a hobby, however when it comes to ghost stories I scream like a girlscout at a Justin Beiber concert and run like hell...


/Hellraiser was nightmare fuel for me for years
 
2014-04-13 03:11:29 AM
Why are we even here? The comments in TFA rock the house.

We are small men.

Go on about your business, now...
 
2014-04-13 03:11:35 AM
I am unsure how well it has held up over the years, but Ecos "Foucaults Pendulum" was enjoyable and creepy and out there back in the day.
I really should reread it one of these days and see how it does in this new instant information age.
 
2014-04-13 03:15:54 AM
tvaraj.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-04-13 03:21:06 AM
Let the Right One In by John Ajvide Lindqvist

The Raw Shark Texts by Steven Hall, less creepy but just as weird/experimental/engaging
 
2014-04-13 03:22:29 AM

The English Major: We Need to Talk About Kevin, Lionel Shriver


Yes, that book was devastating.
 
2014-04-13 03:23:54 AM
I always loved the Amelia Bedelia books, but I will never ever read Encyclopedia Brown ever again.

Way too scary...ick!
 
2014-04-13 03:25:16 AM
Glad to see Mr. Lovecraft is well represented here.  There are several good collections of his short stories - some of my favorite individual ones are:

The Cats of Ulthar
Herbert West - Reanimator
Pickman's Model
The Rats in the Walls
The Colour Out of Space

Another one that is more of a novella than a short story is, "The Dream Quest of Unknown Kadath,"  which kind of blends Lovecraft's creepy setting with a Tolkien style epic fantasy plotline - super fun read and maybe my favorite of Lovecraft's stuff.

Also Clive Barker's The Thief of Always is probably one of the creepiest children's books you can get ahold of.
 
2014-04-13 03:29:33 AM
Penpal, it originally started out as a series of stories on Reddit's /r/nosleep section.
 
2014-04-13 03:32:15 AM
Oh - you should be prepared when reading Lovecraft...he is a racist, and alot of his story lines center around the resultant horrors of mongrelization or micegenation.  So you have to take some of his BS with a grain of salt - but the man can write a creepfest.
 
2014-04-13 03:32:23 AM
Anything by Ann Rand.
 
2014-04-13 03:35:38 AM

CAPTIAN SLAPPY: Anything by Ann Rand.


The only thing creepy about her books is that grown adults use them as philosophy.
 
2014-04-13 03:37:13 AM
The King in Yellow
A Season in Carcosa

Anything by...
* Algernon Blackwood (esp. if it includes "The Willows", "The Wendigo" or "The Man Whom Trees Loved")
* Arthur Machen
Ambrose Bierce
Thomas Ligotti
Laird Barron
H P Lovecraft
Caitlin Kiernan

Why yes, how could you tell I'm spending the weekend at the H P Lovecraft Film Festival?
 
2014-04-13 03:39:20 AM

hubris73: Oh - you should be prepared when reading Lovecraft...he is a racist, and alot of his story lines center around the resultant horrors of mongrelization or micegenation.  So you have to take some of his BS with a grain of salt - but the man can write a creepfest.


Very few actually. Yes I just spent two hours with talking with a panel of scholars of the genre and HPL in particular, mostly of color. He was a racist, but he wrote relatively few racist stories. The Horror at Red Hook is the worst. Most of the others? No better or worse than most of his era and certainly better than, say, Sax Rohmer.
 
2014-04-13 03:39:38 AM
The Snowman by Jo Nesbo
 
2014-04-13 03:40:02 AM
Turn of the Screw. Is she or isn't she?/It's free via Project Gutenberg.
 
2014-04-13 03:47:41 AM
Simon Green's Blue Moon Rising has some extremely creepy bits even if it isn't overall creepy
 
2014-04-13 03:53:36 AM
If you like short stories, pick up a collection of M.R. James -- the grand master of the "retiring scholar finds obscure document in ancient language, unleashes demonic horror" genre. After I read "Count Magnus" and "A Warning To The Curious" I couldn't sleep with the book in the room.
 
2014-04-13 03:53:52 AM
"The Tetherballs of Bougainville" - Mark Leyner
Maybe too much fun to be truly creepy, but more accessible than the creepier "The Sugar-Frosted Nutsack"
 
2014-04-13 03:57:22 AM
The problem with "creepy" is that it relies on the gradual realization that something is  wrong in a story that starts out in another genre entirely.  If you already  know that it's supposed to be 'creepy' because someone recommended it to you as such, much of the time that foreknowledge is going to spoil the creepiness for you.

A good example would be "The King in Yellow".  Pretty yawn-ey if you already know what the unifying theme/element is in advance.

That said:

4.bp.blogspot.com

Chapter 1: Oh, what a charming little classic-style adventure story in a sort of "Belgarion" way.  I wonder why it wasn't shelved in the YA section.

Final chapter: *puts book down* *slowly backs out of room, careful not to look away until safely out the door*
 
2014-04-13 04:15:17 AM
Stiff. My sister gave it to me and said it was a bit disturbing. The reviews put it as funny. I have yet to crack it open out of fear for the unknown.
 
2014-04-13 04:15:58 AM
Depends on what you find creepy. Personally, I find little creepy. But, I have thousands of books so maybe a few might suffice:

Necroscope and Psychomech by Brian Lumley
The Great and Secret Show by Clive Barker
The Servants of Twilight and Darkfall by Dean R Koontz
NightBlood by T Chris Martindale
Blue World, Mystery Walk, and Wolf's Hour by Robert R McCammon
Entity by Nina Mandelik
Night Things by Michael Talbot
Dawn of the Vampire by William Hill
Legion of the Dead by Geoffrey Caine
Dark Miracle by Stephen R George
Shadow Dance by Douglas Borton

Some that aren't really creepy but might creep out some:

The Anita Blake Vampire Novels (Guilty Pleasures is first in the series) by Laurell K Hamilton
The Vampire Files (Bloodlist is first in the series) by P N Elrod

Not all are great but most worth a read. Lumley, Barker, Koontz, Martindale, and McCammon are all worth reading. Some of the Anita Blake series is worth reading and the Vampire Files are also great though one is more supernatural hunter and the other is pulp vampire fiction I recommend them as good fun reading.
 
2014-04-13 04:16:29 AM
img.fark.net
 
2014-04-13 04:17:25 AM
As a used book dealer, don't feel bad about not reading House of Leaves. I have yet to find one with reading lines to indicate it was fully read.
 
2014-04-13 04:18:58 AM
The Great and Secret Show by Clive Barker This is at the top of my list o creepy.
 
2014-04-13 04:25:11 AM
 
2014-04-13 04:34:54 AM
 
2014-04-13 04:58:21 AM

DeArmondVI: Waiting Period by Hughbert Selby Jr. is decent
The Lost or The Girl Next Door by Jack Ketchum might work
The Dwarf by Par Lagerkvist ain't bad
The Rising -> City of the Dead -> Dead Seatrifecta by Brian Keene is pretty good, too



I like Brian Keen as far as his overall stories go, but he's fair well shiat at dialogue. Especially when he's writing his more ghetto characters.


Also, count me in for Lovecraft. farking nightmare fuel, especially if you really put your imagination into it.

/i might want to get drunk with the guy...then again..
//obscene angles...
 
2014-04-13 05:00:28 AM

ShatteredMinds: Depends on what you find creepy. Personally, I find little creepy. But, I have thousands of books so maybe a few might suffice:

Necroscope and Psychomech by Brian Lumley
The Great and Secret Show by Clive Barker
The Servants of Twilight and Darkfall by Dean R Koontz
NightBlood by T Chris Martindale
Blue World, Mystery Walk, and Wolf's Hour by Robert R McCammon
Entity by Nina Mandelik
Night Things by Michael Talbot
Dawn of the Vampire by William Hill
Legion of the Dead by Geoffrey Caine
Dark Miracle by Stephen R George
Shadow Dance by Douglas Borton

Some that aren't really creepy but might creep out some:

The Anita Blake Vampire Novels (Guilty Pleasures is first in the series) by Laurell K Hamilton
The Vampire Files (Bloodlist is first in the series) by P N Elrod

Not all are great but most worth a read. Lumley, Barker, Koontz, Martindale, and McCammon are all worth reading. Some of the Anita Blake series is worth reading and the Vampire Files are also great though one is more supernatural hunter and the other is pulp vampire fiction I recommend them as good fun reading.


Get out of my mind!

/Have read most of the books on your list.
//Only book I can add is Swan Song by R McCammon
///You must be a genius, because you think like me.
 
2014-04-13 05:13:19 AM

doglover: kronicfeld: Hey, asshole, read House of Leaves.

You need to have a physical copy of that one. It doesn't work on audio or pdf.


True that. Bonus for reading the last quarter or so somewhere public, too.

But yeah, House of Leaves is creepy as hell, and amazing - it's one of the only experimental-structure, (post)modernist books I've seen that actually WORKS, instead of being a stupid gimmick without a story to hold it up.

RodneyToady: House of Leaves may be my favorite book.  I like reading it while listening to Poe's Haunted album.


RodneyToady, you probably know this, but for those who don't: Poe is the author's sister, and wrote that album to go with the book. Haven't actually listened to it myself.

 Recommendations:


And as others have said, Lovecraft and other Mythos writers, duh. And Dracula.

Dracula owes a great deal to a lesser-known book called Carmilla, by Le Fanu. Also, I don't know how the thread has failed to mention Edgar Allen Poe yet, especially when we're talking about horror classics. The stories more than the poetry.  If you've never read The Picture of Dorian Gray, by Oscar Wilde, that's another of the great Victorian horror classics. Frankenstein, though interesting and historically important, is far less creepy to modern audiences than it was when first written.... especially if you've seen Young Frankenstein (which you should, it's hilarious). Though it's worth noting that the idea of raising the dead with electricity came directly from the then-very-new-and-horrifying experiments where scientists discovered that you could use electricity to make the muscles of dead animals contract, and the story itself because Mary Shelley was involved in a ghost story contest with none other than Lord Byron. (I took a course on Victorian Fantasy and Science Fiction one semester in college, because why the hell wouldn't a nerd want to do that?! Which was also why the professor decided to teach it.)

Not creepy either, but of interest for House of Leaves fans and just plain cool, is the work of Jorge Luis Borges. Borges is sort of like if Salvador Dali and a topological mathematician had a baby, and the baby grew up to work in a library and write short stories. In Spanish, but they're readily available in translation.

There's also a yearly anthology called The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror (or something to that effect), which tends to have some good short stories in it. One specific short story I cannot recommend highly enough is "Details", by China Mieville. His stuff is generally one part horror, one part urban fantasy, one part Borges, and one part I-used-the-Monster-Manual-as-LSD-paper, and then each novel usually borrows some other primary genre, so I can't recommend most of it as primarily horror (though it's worth checking out anyway). But "Details" is just straight up one of the creepiest short stories I've ever read. His novella "The Tain" is pretty damn creepy, too, as it's about the things that live inside mirrors breaking out and taking over.
 
2014-04-13 05:20:07 AM
Invisible Monsters by Pahlaniuk
 
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