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(Science Magazine)   In New York City, 22 year old Measles Mary contracted measles and passed it along to four others. Difficulty: all five of these people should have been immune. Measles Mary and two of the others had actually been vaccinated   (news.sciencemag.org) divider line 49
    More: Interesting, Measles Mary, New York City, Clinical Infectious Diseases, Typhoid Mary, measles vaccine, measles, respiratory tract infections  
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5726 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Apr 2014 at 11:02 PM (36 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2014-04-12 11:24:19 PM  
6 votes:

Frederick: Ambivalence: Frederick: Good thing we got rid of all those cars killing children.

Cars are a lot safer for children than they used to be.  That whole frakas about requiring back up cameras is specificly intended to protect children.

Is that true?  I dont know the statistics.  I did just read about a kid getting killed by a car yesterday though.  Havent read about a kid getting killed by measles (although I did just read a story about measles where no one died).


Well, here's a story where a kid did die:

"Olivia, my eldest daughter, caught measles when she was seven years old. As the illness took its usual course I can remember reading to her often in bed and not feeling particularly alarmed about it. Then one morning, when she was well on the road to recovery, I was sitting on her bed showing her how to fashion little animals out of coloured pipe-cleaners, and when it came to her turn to make one herself, I noticed that her fingers and her mind were not working together and she couldn't do anything.

"Are you feeling all right?" I asked her.

"I feel all sleepy, " she said.

In an hour, she was unconscious. In twelve hours she was dead."

The measles had turned into a terrible thing called measles encephalitis and there was nothing the doctors could do to save her.

That was twenty-four years ago in 1962, but even now, if a child with measles happens to develop the same deadly reaction from measles as Olivia did, there would still be nothing the doctors could do to help her.


~Roald Dahl

But hey...

On one side we have almost every single doctor, immunologist and epidemiologist in the world, with millions of collective years of experience and studies involving millions upon millions of adults and children from countries across the globe, spanning decades and in some cases looking at every person in the countries population in decades long experiments.

On the other side we have a former playboy centerfold with a high school education and a tiny, misquoted, and flawed study that didn't even claim to link the MMR vaccine to autism.

Welp - too tough to choose, better risk Junior getting killed by an easily preventable illness than opt for vaccination.
2014-04-12 11:20:27 PM  
6 votes:
All of you people talking about how your parents intentionally exposed you to chicken pox as a kid and it didn't kill you can thank them when you get shingles and wish you were dead. That chicken pox virus is in your body lying dormant and later in life will wake back up, latch onto nerve cells and will cause you more pain then you've ever experienced.

Enjoy.

Also, every case of measles is a chance for the virus to mutant inside the host then spread in a form that the vaccines the rest of us got can't defend against. So.. you're putting everyone at risk. Everyone. These diseases can and do kill people and who knows how deadly a mutated version will be. So.. thanks.
2014-04-12 10:39:47 PM  
5 votes:

Frederick: Lsherm: And you'll probably need a booster shot because idiots won't vaccinate their kids, thus making the risk of exposure exponentially higher because of stupid.

Arent those the exact people you'd like to see eliminated from the gene pool?


Do you not understand why vaccines work?  It's not a "personal" decision.  It gets worse with more people who don't get vaccinated.  They don't just kill or infect themselves, they expose more risk to everyone in the pool.
2014-04-12 10:29:51 PM  
5 votes:

JoieD'Zen: Suck it herd people. Why have the vaccines if you can still get the disease?


Because as they pointed out in the article, she was an outlier, not a common case.  All it means is you may need a booster shot again later in life.  And you'll probably need a booster shot because idiots won't vaccinate their kids, thus making the risk of exposure exponentially higher because of stupid.
2014-04-12 09:57:41 PM  
5 votes:

JoieD'Zen: Frederick: I had the measles (and chicken pox) as a kid.  It's not polio or aids.  Quit being pussies.  And take your damn bicycle helmet off, your riding on the farking bike path.

It wasn't uncommon for parents (50-60's) to expose their kids to another that was sick with mumps or chickenpox so they would get it and be immune.
No helmets and setbelts either.
None of us died or had all these bs 'disorders' either.


Actually, kids did die (even of chicken pox).  That's kind of why they made the vaccines in the first place.
2014-04-12 08:28:45 PM  
5 votes:
Omfg. Vaccinations don't mean immunity. They mean reaistance. All vaccinations in general are doing is creating superbacteria that is one day going to kill us all.
2014-04-13 12:50:44 AM  
4 votes:

Ambivalence: The day they make a flu vaccine that covers all strains, I will be first in line to get it.


This statement sort of sums up the level of knowledge that most anti-vaxxers are working with.
2014-04-12 11:13:22 PM  
4 votes:
 Vaccines don't always work the first time you get them, and not all vaccines work well on everyoby. Immunity can also wear off after several years.
This is why it's important to have titers performed regularly.
A titer is a test where they take some of your blood to see if you actually have working antibodies against a disease.
2014-04-12 11:22:19 PM  
3 votes:
Not getting vaccinated is like driving drunk: you think you're safe, but you endanger yourself and everyone around you. Unfortunately, only one of these is illegal.
2014-04-12 11:20:59 PM  
3 votes:

Frederick: Is that true?  I dont know the statistics.  I did just read about a kid getting killed by a car yesterday though.  Havent read about a kid getting killed by measles (although I did just read a story about measles where no one died).


Jesus Christ, what do you work for Fox news?  "No one I knew ever died of measels."

According to wikipedia the moratlity rate for measels is approx 3 per 1000 cases.

Whooping cough: (also wikipedia) "It is currently estimated that the disease annually affects 48.5 million people worldwide, resulting in nearly 295,000 deaths"

Chicken pox: (CDC website, referring to pre-vaccination days) "In the early 1990s, an average of 4 million people got chickenpox, 10,500 to 13,000 were hospitalized (range, 8,000 to 18,000), and 100 to 150 died each year."

It doesn't sound like many, until it's your kid or family member.
2014-04-12 11:07:57 PM  
3 votes:

Frederick: Lsherm: Frederick: Lsherm: And you'll probably need a booster shot because idiots won't vaccinate their kids, thus making the risk of exposure exponentially higher because of stupid.

Arent those the exact people you'd like to see eliminated from the gene pool?

Do you not understand why vaccines work?  It's not a "personal" decision.  It gets worse with more people who don't get vaccinated.  They don't just kill or infect themselves, they expose more risk to everyone in the pool.

Thats hardly an answer to the question.

Arent the "idiots" "because of stupid" the ones you'd like to see eliminated from the gene pool?


And you missed the point of his answer. They don't just take THEMSELVES out of the gene pool. They put other people at risk. Even people who have been vaccinated.
2014-04-12 10:53:26 PM  
3 votes:

Lsherm: Ambivalence: Actually, kids did die (even of chicken pox).  That's kind of why they made the vaccines in the first place.

I was pre-chicken pox vaccine.  If kids were dying, it was very rare.  Chicken-pox parties in the 70's were extremely popular, especially if a patient-zero kid in the neighborhood got it during the summer, because that meant kids wouldn't miss school.  I went to mine in June,1969 with at least ten other kids.  The kid who got it first had a pool at his house, so it was all good as far as we were concerned.

No one died.  And honestly, we were at a far greater risk of drowning than dying of Chicken-pox.


It was rare, but it did happen.  That is why now (that they have a vaccine) they're telling parents not to have chicken pox parties anymore because the vaccine is safer than contracting the disease.  Any disease can have complications, sometimes fatal.
2014-04-12 09:54:51 PM  
3 votes:

Frederick: I had the measles (and chicken pox) as a kid.  It's not polio or aids.  Quit being pussies.  And take your damn bicycle helmet off, your riding on the farking bike path.


It wasn't uncommon for parents (50-60's) to expose their kids to another that was sick with mumps or chickenpox so they would get it and be immune.
No helmets and setbelts either.
None of us died or had all these bs 'disorders' either.
2014-04-13 03:41:29 PM  
2 votes:

Ambivalence: whatshisname: Ambivalence: The day they make a flu vaccine that covers all strains, I will be first in line to get it.

This statement sort of sums up the level of knowledge that most anti-vaxxers are working with.

I'm not an anti-vaxxer.  I have been vacinated and get regular boosters for almost every commonly vaccinated disease. I have 0 incidents of flu.  That is fairly remarkable considering how common flu is and considering how old I am.  I never even had flu as a child.  A yearly flu shot is not going to give me fewer than 0 incidents of flu, and it could possibly give me more than 0 incidents of flu.

If I ever get my first flu, then I'll start getting vacinated for it. Or when I enter a high risk catagory, then I'll get vaccinated.  Until then, I'm not going to fark with success. The flu vaccine, as it is now, is a craps shoot.  Maybe you get a good one that covers all the strains for the year, maybe you don't.


While yes, it is true that epidemiologist are trying to project which strains will be the most prevalent in a given year (based on global trends), your original post has a few flaws.

1. While there are many strains of the flu virus (not sure if it is dozens, hundreds, or thousands) they are not unrelated.  Immunity to one strain can give partial or total immunity to other strains, depending on the level of mutation.
2. While it is true that it is impossible to predict exactly how each flu season will play out, an epidemic does need a sustainable mass to exist.  So it is not as if some obscure strain from 15 years ago ls likely to pop up out of the blue.
3. The effects of vaccines are cumulative-so while yes, there are many strains out there, once you are vaccinated against one strain, you will stay resistant to that strain for a decent amount of time.

While I understand that you may feel like a flu vaccine is not necessary for you, your reasons are based on several misconceptions.  No, the flu vaccine is not a panacea, but it is a good thing with little downside.
2014-04-13 06:21:00 AM  
2 votes:
The worst thing about skipping your kid's MMR vaccine (Measles, Mumps, Rubella), aside from getting or passing along what can be occasionally fatal diseases, is that your decision can maim and kill unborn babies.
Rubella (German Measles) is generally mild, but kills, blinds, mentally retards, and causes serious heart, liver & other organ issues in the baby. Oh, and deafness, miscarriage, and preterm labor.
So, if your kid isn't vaccinated, know that if you get pregnant again, that mild rash he brings home may kill or maim your new baby. Or the baby of anyone else he comes in contact with.
Rubella in utero isn't a 1-in-a-thousand thing, either.
Rubella is such a serious risk that pregnant women can't even get the vaccine - there is no safe exposure level.
2014-04-13 01:45:52 AM  
2 votes:
Ah, antivaxxers.  When you'll be DAMNED if you'll let something small like the lives of children get in the way of you enjoying some bullshiat trend!  "Oh, sorry about your little infant girl I infected who died in agony weeks later.  I didn't want to sully my karma and break up the harmonics of my magic soulwalker crystals by doing something reasonable a basement level intellect could fathom better than I could."
2014-04-13 01:09:07 AM  
2 votes:

Ambivalence: I have never EVER had the flu, in my entire life (not including stomach flu which isn't actually flu at all). 40 years, flu free and no vaccine. I realize that flu vaccine is very important for people who are in high risk catagories, and getting a flu shot is on my list of things I will do on my 60th birthday (I'm getting a tattoo on my 50th).


Viruses exist because we allow them to spread. When you get it, you will pass it on to others, who will pass it on again - and there are better than even odds that by some concatenation of infections, you will pass the disease on to someone who dies from it, maybe even someone you know and love.

But I don't understand getting vaccinated for a disease I never get (despite being regularly exposed to it) especially when the vaccine is only for strains that are projected to be big that year, not neccessarily strains that actually happen.

There are generally 2 or 3 strains that are frequent any given year. By studying what strains are carried by migratory birds in south Asia (which spread through small farms in Asia that raise fowl and pigs, to humans in Asia, and then to the rest of the world), more often than not, all the actively spreading strains are included in the vaccine. The 2003-04 flu season is cited as a bad year, because the vaccine "only" protected against the strains contracted by about 60% of infected unvaccinated people.

I forget if it was last year or the year before last where people who had the shot actually had higher instances of the flu, but it was fairly recently.

Possibly in raw numbers, but a very large fraction of the people who receive the vaccine are mandated to do so because they are in contact with highly contagious populations (school teachers) and/or highly at-risk populations (hospitals). If those people are 100 times as exposed to the flu than the public at large, and the vaccine is, say, only 60% effective, then they would still get the flu 40 times as often as the general public - but less than half as frequently as they would without the vaccine.

The day they make a flu vaccine that covers all strains, I will be first in line to get it.  But the biggest problem with flu vaccine is that there is no one flu.  There are literally thousands of different strains of flu.  Can you imagine if there were thousands of different strains of polio and every year you got a shot that worked against a dozen of them and you better hope to God no other strains come out that year or you'd be in a wheelchair the rest of your life?

So you're being forced to play russian roulette, and someone offers to take out a few bullets. And you say no because there are still bullets in the gun?

That is just me, but it's not a position of ignorance.

Just a position of hubris.
2014-04-12 11:49:45 PM  
2 votes:
Meh, boosters are made for a reason, too bad no one thinks to get them.
2014-04-12 11:26:35 PM  
2 votes:

Frederick: Ambivalence: Frederick: Good thing we got rid of all those cars killing children.

Cars are a lot safer for children than they used to be.  That whole frakas about requiring back up cameras is specificly intended to protect children.

Is that true?  I dont know the statistics.  I did just read about a kid getting killed by a car yesterday though.  Havent read about a kid getting killed by measles (although I did just read a story about measles where no one died).


Are you farking insane? Measles results in a 1:1000 case chance of being permanently disabled secondary to measles encephalopathy. If we stopped vaccinating, 2.7  Million children would die a year. Rate of death is 1:4500
2014-04-12 11:16:10 PM  
2 votes:

Lsherm: Ambivalence: Actually, kids did die (even of chicken pox).  That's kind of why they made the vaccines in the first place.

I was pre-chicken pox vaccine.  If kids were dying, it was very rare.  Chicken-pox parties in the 70's were extremely popular, especially if a patient-zero kid in the neighborhood got it during the summer, because that meant kids wouldn't miss school.  I went to mine in June,1969 with at least ten other kids.  The kid who got it first had a pool at his house, so it was all good as far as we were concerned.

No one died.  And honestly, we were at a far greater risk of drowning than dying of Chicken-pox.


Wait till you get shingles. You'll love it!
2014-04-13 11:43:25 AM  
1 votes:

Gyrfalcon:
Currently, if you're not in an at-risk group and are otherwise healthy, there's no reason to get a flu vaccine and use a dose that's needed by the at-risk population. "At-risk" being defined as very young, very old, immuno-compromised, and those working in such populations, such as teachers, healthcare workers and first responders. Healthy adults between the ages of 20-50 with no health problems and no contact with kids on a regular basis are probably okay not to get a flu shot.

That said, if you DO come down with the flu, do the rest of us a favor and stay the f*ck at home so you get better quicker and the rest of us don't get infected thank you very much.


Do you know what fomites are?

When you are in the presymptomatic phase of influenza (and many other illnesses) infection, you shed the virus.

So when you touch the cart at the store or the PIN pad or the elevator button, congratulations you've left an infectious deposit for someone else, and you have no way of knowing if that next person to touch it is perfectly healthy or an end-stage cancer patient with an immune system that gave up months ago.

Will it kill you if/when you get the flu? Probably not; though H1N1, which circulated this year and was included in this year's trivalent vaccine, does seem to kill young adults and pregnant women at a much higher rate than other strains, so you never know. But, assuming you aren't a shut-in, you DO interact with people in vulnerable populations. Either directly or because lots of your bugs will hang around after you leave.

Getting your flu shot isn't just about you, it's about being a good member of your community and helping protect those who can't be adequately protected by the vaccine (who are the ones who most need protection from flu.)
2014-04-13 09:09:37 AM  
1 votes:

Frederick: I had the measles (and chicken pox) as a kid.  It's not polio or aids.  Quit being pussies.  And take your damn bicycle helmet off, your riding on the farking bike path.


What magical device do they insert into the bike paths that make it impossible to fall off or makes a collision between bikes impossible?
2014-04-13 04:10:55 AM  
1 votes:

JoieD'Zen: Frederick: I had the measles (and chicken pox) as a kid.  It's not polio or aids.  Quit being pussies.  And take your damn bicycle helmet off, your riding on the farking bike path.

It wasn't uncommon for parents (50-60's) to expose their kids to another that was sick with mumps or chickenpox so they would get it and be immune.
No helmets and setbelts either.
None of us died or had all these bs 'disorders' either.


5/10.. No one's this dumb.
2014-04-13 03:06:15 AM  
1 votes:

gfid: Enigmamf: a very large fraction of the people who receive the vaccine are mandated to do so because they are in contact with highly contagious populations (school teachers) and/or highly at-risk populations (hospitals).

Yep - and this is one of my excuses for not getting a flu vaccine.  I'm not an anti-vax person, but I just don't feel the need to get a flu vaccine.  I don't work with children and I don't work in a hospital.  I expect my biggest risk comes from buying produce at a grocery store.  Who knows how many other people have picked up that apple before you and put it back?

I don't.  This is why I try to pick the fruit at the very bottom of the stack of fruit, but that doesn't mean that whoever picked that apple didn't take a shiat 5 minutes before they picked it and didn't wash their hands.

Hey, the good news is I probably won't get the flu from that.  I may get something else, but the flu is unlikely.


 If you do get the flu though, you could very well infect someone in an at risk group.
2014-04-13 02:13:34 AM  
1 votes:

Ambivalence: The day they make a flu vaccine that covers all strains, I will be first in line to get it.  But the biggest problem with flu vaccine is that there is no one flu.  There are literally thousands of different strains of flu.  Can you imagine if there were thousands of different strains of polio and every year you got a shot that worked against a dozen of them and you better hope to God no other strains come out that year or you'd be in a wheelchair the rest of your life?


Resistance to the most likely projected strains of the flu for that year is better than not having that resistance - it's better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it.  I don't see why I wouldn't get vaccinated.
2014-04-13 01:44:46 AM  
1 votes:

Frederick: Ambivalence: Okay, so there are anti-vaxxers, and apparently there are vaxxer evangelicals and I don't particularly want to be in either group so I'm going to step away from this discussion.

Good night.

The only way to win is to not play.


t3.gstatic.com
2014-04-13 01:37:45 AM  
1 votes:
Immunosuppressed person here, thanks for making me scared to leave the house. Fark you deniers very, very, very much.

/Also had shingles (in January) and was told on my meds I can totes get it again and again.
//Vicodin did nothing and if you'd offered me heroin during the worst of it I would've said yes, and that was with fast top-of-the-line antivirals.
2014-04-13 01:30:02 AM  
1 votes:
Meh, the measles vaccine is one of the somewhat less effective ones.  Hell, I got measles when I was a kid, even though I was vaccinated.

That said, this isn't an excuse not to vaccinate.  Some protection is better than none, and none is exactly what the anti-vaxxers want.
2014-04-13 12:53:24 AM  
1 votes:
Anyone not needing theirs, I'll take an extra. I wouldn't mind a booster. Granted I rarely leave my cave but when I do I don't want to be infected by all you crazy people.
2014-04-13 12:38:51 AM  
1 votes:

doglover: QED Outside of pediatrics, it's easy to discount any illnesses that kills only babies as non-fatal because everything can potentially kill babies, even honey.


Unfortunately, there's a significant amount of the population walking around today who are immunocompromised for one reason or another - transplant, cancer treatment, medicine regiment, etc.
2014-04-13 12:32:13 AM  
1 votes:
Huh. This is easily one of the derpiest (yep, that's a word now) threads I've ever seen outside of the Politics tab. Well done, anti-vaxxers, seriously. Keep it up and we'll regress to the days when idiots like Charles Meigs would passionately argue against HAND WASHING FOR DOCTORS because, "doctors are gentlemen, and gentlemen's hands are always clean."

/it's alright, just keep telling yourselves that you know what you're talking about...
2014-04-13 12:24:10 AM  
1 votes:

meat0918: hardinparamedic: meat0918: I just hope no one ends up dead because of this idiocy.

I know of one locally this year.

We had one flu related death here.  Kid.  Vaccinated too, but his parents were not because of money issues.  Neither his brother or sister who were also vaccinated got sick.  Mom blames herself, implored other parents to not do what she did and get vaccinated when your kids do.


I was at a party recently and asked a few otherwise intelligent people if they'd had the flu vaccine and they looked at me like I'd asked them to  test some sort of new pharmaceutical. There's still a lot of ignorance out there.
2014-04-13 12:04:53 AM  
1 votes:

Wild Eyed and Wicked: When I was a kid, we lived in a little town with one doctor. I was diagnosed with measles twice. When I was 15, I fell ill and them broke out head to toe in this horrible rash and he again diagnosed me with measles. When my mother told him I had already had them twice, he stated that it was impossible. My mother them told h that he diagnosed me both times and then promptly to me to a emergency room. I actually had toxic shock syndrome that time. Who know what I had the other times...


It's people like you and your TSS that got Rely tampons pulled. I hope you're happy.
2014-04-12 11:51:57 PM  
1 votes:
When I have friends that move to the west coast I always recommend they talk to their doc about vaccine boosters. I caught whopping cough about a year after I moved from the mid west to Oregon. To me whooping cough was something you read about in historical period pieces. Made me very grumbly at the anti-vaccine crowd.
2014-04-12 11:51:35 PM  
1 votes:

Ambivalence: What is it, 40% of the human genome is derived from viruses? (took a biology class last semester). I always wondered what kind of stuff they left behind. What virus can account for the oddities of human existance?


www.comedy.co.uk

Scientists are attempting to confirm the existence of the Reverse Flu virus, which gives the afflicted an unjustified sense of happiness and well-being.  Apparently morning DJs suffer from it constantly.
2014-04-12 11:49:25 PM  
1 votes:

RoyBatty: 27B-6: Vaccines don't always work the first time you get them, and not all vaccines work well on everyoby. Immunity can also wear off after several years.
This is why it's important to have titers performed regularly.
A titer is a test where they take some of your blood to see if you actually have working antibodies against a disease.

Is that a test commonly covered by insurance


Many plans will cover titers. It's way cheaper for them to make sure everyone is actually immune than to pay for your treatment when you get sick.
2014-04-12 11:39:39 PM  
1 votes:
Frederick: Havent read about a kid getting killed by measles (although I did just read a story about measles where no one died).

Backtrack or troll. Which is it?
2014-04-12 11:39:21 PM  
1 votes:

jmcgeathy: Ya they had limited information, now we know better.. yet all of the idiots are using "well it didn't kill me" as a way to blow off the importance of vaccinations. And they aren't just effecting themselves and their kids, they are putting every single person at risk of preventable illnesses that can lead to long term complications and death. And since they are such smart, brave, strong people who didn't die from chicken pox it's unlikely they would bother with a shingles vaccines either.

Then.. karma hits.


I don't think anyone was using "it didn't kill me" as a reason to not get vaccinations.  If I was giving off that vibe, my apologies.  I was poorly pointing out that if chickenpox didn't kill the 12 kids in my neighborhood growing up that a vaccine certainly wasn't going to do anything worse.  Or that chicken pox really wasn't that horrible (but it was).
2014-04-12 11:31:28 PM  
1 votes:

Lsherm: jmcgeathy: All of you people talking about how your parents intentionally exposed you to chicken pox as a kid and it didn't kill you can thank them when you get shingles and wish you were dead. That chicken pox virus is in your body lying dormant and later in life will wake back up, latch onto nerve cells and will cause you more pain then you've ever experienced.

Enjoy.

Also, every case of measles is a chance for the virus to mutant inside the host then spread in a form that the vaccines the rest of us got can't defend against. So.. you're putting everyone at risk. Everyone. These diseases can and do kill people and who knows how deadly a mutated version will be. So.. thanks.

Good farking Christ, there wasn't a vaccine for it when we were kids, and getting chickenpox as an adult for the first time is far worse than getting a case of shingles after you've already have chickenpox as a kid.  Sure, getting a vaccine is infinitely preferable, but since it wasn't available, pox parties were the best option.  Bonus?  You can still get the vaccine today even if you had chickenpox as a kid.


Ya they had limited information, now we know better.. yet all of the idiots are using "well it didn't kill me" as a way to blow off the importance of vaccinations. And they aren't just effecting themselves and their kids, they are putting every single person at risk of preventable illnesses that can lead to long term complications and death. And since they are such smart, brave, strong people who didn't die from chicken pox it's unlikely they would bother with a shingles vaccines either.

Then.. karma hits.
2014-04-12 11:31:25 PM  
1 votes:

JoieD'Zen: Triumph: we'refromthesamestory: All vaccinations in general are doing is creating superbacteria

Please proceed.

Antibiotics lower  natural resistance to all diseases and create the superbugs.


Retard or troll.  <notsure.gif>
2014-04-12 11:31:09 PM  
1 votes:

Frederick: LordJiro: And you missed the point of his answer. They don't just take THEMSELVES out of the gene pool. They put other people at risk. Even people who have been vaccinated.

No, I got the point.  I wasnt interested in his point.  I was interested in an answer to the question.


"He answered the question, but I want him to answer the question!"
2014-04-12 11:27:35 PM  
1 votes:

27B-6: Vaccines don't always work the first time you get them, and not all vaccines work well on everyoby. Immunity can also wear off after several years.
This is why it's important to have titers performed regularly.
A titer is a test where they take some of your blood to see if you actually have working antibodies against a disease.


Is that a test commonly covered by insurance?
2014-04-12 11:23:46 PM  
1 votes:

brilett: Wait till you get shingles. You'll love it!


My parents get sometimes quite nasty outbreaks of shingles.

Glad my generation had chicken pox vaccine, versus having to deal with THAT in my old age.
2014-04-12 11:19:34 PM  
1 votes:

TheBigJerk: And I farked up the first link; 184 deaths.


And now they're down to less than 66 deaths a year since the vaccine.  I'd say we're improving, if only by a little.
2014-04-12 11:18:45 PM  
1 votes:
Vaccinations don't make you immune to a disease, with very specific exceptions to this. Film at 11.
2014-04-12 11:14:29 PM  
1 votes:
And I farked up the first link; 184 deaths.
2014-04-12 11:13:36 PM  
1 votes:

Ambivalence: Lsherm: Ambivalence: Actually, kids did die (even of chicken pox).  That's kind of why they made the vaccines in the first place.

I was pre-chicken pox vaccine.  If kids were dying, it was very rare.  Chicken-pox parties in the 70's were extremely popular, especially if a patient-zero kid in the neighborhood got it during the summer, because that meant kids wouldn't miss school.  I went to mine in June,1969 with at least ten other kids.  The kid who got it first had a pool at his house, so it was all good as far as we were concerned.

No one died.  And honestly, we were at a far greater risk of drowning than dying of Chicken-pox.

It was rare, but it did happen.  That is why now (that they have a vaccine) they're telling parents not to have chicken pox parties anymore because the vaccine is safer than contracting the disease.  Any disease can have complications, sometimes fatal.


As of the 90s, when it wasn't mandated but had been around for 20 years, you got around 184 deaths a year.  Kid population was around 42 million.  I'll let you decide if that counts as "rare enough" yourself.
2014-04-12 11:12:51 PM  
1 votes:

Frederick: Lsherm: Frederick: Lsherm: And you'll probably need a booster shot because idiots won't vaccinate their kids, thus making the risk of exposure exponentially higher because of stupid.

Arent those the exact people you'd like to see eliminated from the gene pool?

Do you not understand why vaccines work?  It's not a "personal" decision.  It gets worse with more people who don't get vaccinated.  They don't just kill or infect themselves, they expose more risk to everyone in the pool.

Thats hardly an answer to the question.

Arent the "idiots" "because of stupid" the ones you'd like to see eliminated from the gene pool?


If you don't understand how he answered the question, you  are an idiot.
2014-04-12 11:09:43 PM  
1 votes:

Lsherm: Ambivalence: Actually, kids did die (even of chicken pox).  That's kind of why they made the vaccines in the first place.

I was pre-chicken pox vaccine.  If kids were dying, it was very rare.  Chicken-pox parties in the 70's were extremely popular, especially if a patient-zero kid in the neighborhood got it during the summer, because that meant kids wouldn't miss school.  I went to mine in June,1969 with at least ten other kids.  The kid who got it first had a pool at his house, so it was all good as far as we were concerned.

No one died.  And honestly, we were at a far greater risk of drowning than dying of Chicken-pox.


I was pre-chicken pox vaccine too. One of my classmates got chicken pox in her throat and on the insides of her eyelids. She spent several weeks in the hospital for it.

One of my mother's college friend's husband got chicken pox when he was forty. It nearly killed him and he spent 3 months in the hospital from it.
 
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