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(Science Magazine)   In New York City, 22 year old Measles Mary contracted measles and passed it along to four others. Difficulty: all five of these people should have been immune. Measles Mary and two of the others had actually been vaccinated   (news.sciencemag.org) divider line 201
    More: Interesting, Measles Mary, New York City, Clinical Infectious Diseases, Typhoid Mary, measles vaccine, measles, respiratory tract infections  
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5708 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Apr 2014 at 11:02 PM (27 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-12 11:54:19 PM  

mikaloyd: All we know for sure is that vaccination enthusiasts are some very angry posters on FARK. Must be from getting stuck with needles all the time.


Pick your favorite color. :)

img.fark.net
 
2014-04-12 11:55:07 PM  

hardinparamedic: mikaloyd: All we know for sure is that vaccination enthusiasts are some very angry posters on FARK. Must be from getting stuck with needles all the time.

Pick your favorite color. :)

[img.fark.net image 850x478]


Are those really different colored needles?!?!?

Man, I hate nbeedasles *thud*
 
2014-04-12 11:56:16 PM  

jmcgeathy: When I have friends that move to the west coast I always recommend they talk to their doc about vaccine boosters. I caught whopping cough about a year after I moved from the mid west to Oregon. To me whooping cough was something you read about in historical period pieces. Made me very grumbly at the anti-vaccine crowd.


I always get my tetanus booster every 10 years, but I read somewhere they now have a triple booster for tetanus, whooping cough and diptheria (called tdap) and I'm going to ask for that next time.
 
2014-04-12 11:56:24 PM  

jmcgeathy: Naw, you were more downplaying the seriousness of chickenpox, which on it's own is for most people an annoyance.. until they get shingles. I've seen that put men on their knees crying for Vicodin. It sucks.


Well, never had shingles, but it's my understanding that if you get chickenpox for the first time as an adult it's even worse, so perhaps parents in the 60's and 70's were on to something.
 
2014-04-12 11:56:40 PM  

RoyBatty: 27B-6: Vaccines don't always work the first time you get them, and not all vaccines work well on everyoby. Immunity can also wear off after several years.
This is why it's important to have titers performed regularly.
A titer is a test where they take some of your blood to see if you actually have working antibodies against a disease.

Is that a test commonly covered by insurance?


Yes.
 
2014-04-12 11:56:58 PM  

meat0918: Are those really different colored needles?!?!?

Man, I hate nbeedasles *thud*


Well, IV needles. White-Yellow-Blue-Pink-Green-Silver-Orange-Black denote size from 26 ga to 12/10ga.
 
2014-04-12 11:58:32 PM  
Oooohhh!!! Here it is, anti-vaxers; the smoking gun that vindicates you!  Shout it from the rooftops!!!

/grabs popcorn
 
2014-04-12 11:59:14 PM  

hardinparamedic: meat0918: Are those really different colored needles?!?!?

Man, I hate nbeedasles *thud*

Well, IV needles. White-Yellow-Blue-Pink-Green-Silver-Orange-Black denote size from 26 ga to 12/10ga.


do IV and injection needles ever break off in people?
 
2014-04-13 12:00:50 AM  

StreetlightInTheGhetto: Isn't there a shingles vaccine now/something that stops it from recurring? I remember reading something complaining about not enough older folks getting it...


Yeah, Zostefex or something. *looks it up* Zostavax, that was it.  It's apparently just a really large dose of the Chicken Pox vaccine Varivax.  Also it's not a fully preventative vaccine, it just dramatically reduces the duration and severity of shingles outbreaks, as well as the likelihood of an outbreak.  You still have the virus floating around in your system.
 
2014-04-13 12:01:01 AM  

Ambivalence: hardinparamedic: meat0918: Are those really different colored needles?!?!?

Man, I hate nbeedasles *thud*

Well, IV needles. White-Yellow-Blue-Pink-Green-Silver-Orange-Black denote size from 26 ga to 12/10ga.

do IV and injection needles ever break off in people?



If you're a bad person, yes.
 
2014-04-13 12:01:11 AM  

hardinparamedic: RoyBatty: Is that a test commonly covered by insurance?

If you work in a clinical setting where the are shingles patients, or there is an expectation of exposure to chickenpox, then your employer should cover it.

Out of pocket, the Varicella Titer test costs about 300 bucks locally.


27B-6: RoyBatty: 27B-6: Vaccines don't always work the first time you get them, and not all vaccines work well on everyoby. Immunity can also wear off after several years.
This is why it's important to have titers performed regularly.
A titer is a test where they take some of your blood to see if you actually have working antibodies against a disease.

Is that a test commonly covered by insurance

Many plans will cover titers. It's way cheaper for them to make sure everyone is actually immune than to pay for your treatment when you get sick.


Thank you. Are there titer tests for most vaccines?

For instance, tetanus?

Last I checked, the CDC tells doctors not to give me vaccinations, even for tetanus, but a few days ago I found myself in the ER needing two stitches from a terrible job of cutting off the wrapping of a sausage, and I realize now I gave the PA the wrong information about my last tetanus update.
 
2014-04-13 12:01:56 AM  
When I was a kid, we lived in a little town with one doctor. I was diagnosed with measles twice. When I was 15, I fell ill and them broke out head to toe in this horrible rash and he again diagnosed me with measles. When my mother told him I had already had them twice, he stated that it was impossible. My mother them told h that he diagnosed me both times and then promptly to me to a emergency room. I actually had toxic shock syndrome that time. Who know what I had the other times...
 
2014-04-13 12:02:13 AM  

Ambivalence: hardinparamedic: meat0918: Are those really different colored needles?!?!?

Man, I hate nbeedasles *thud*

Well, IV needles. White-Yellow-Blue-Pink-Green-Silver-Orange-Black denote size from 26 ga to 12/10ga.

do IV and injection needles ever break off in people?


media3.giphy.com

media3.giphy.com
 
2014-04-13 12:03:37 AM  

RoyBatty: Last I checked, the CDC tells doctors not to give me vaccinations, even for tetanus, but a few days ago I found myself in the ER needing two stitches from a terrible job of cutting off the wrapping of a sausage, and I realize now I gave the PA the wrong information about my last tetanus update.


Wha?  When did they have that?  I've never had a problem telling my doctor "I'm due for tetanus booster" and just getting it right there.
 
2014-04-13 12:04:53 AM  

Wild Eyed and Wicked: When I was a kid, we lived in a little town with one doctor. I was diagnosed with measles twice. When I was 15, I fell ill and them broke out head to toe in this horrible rash and he again diagnosed me with measles. When my mother told him I had already had them twice, he stated that it was impossible. My mother them told h that he diagnosed me both times and then promptly to me to a emergency room. I actually had toxic shock syndrome that time. Who know what I had the other times...


It's people like you and your TSS that got Rely tampons pulled. I hope you're happy.
 
2014-04-13 12:05:28 AM  

Ambivalence: do IV and injection needles ever break off in people?


It can happen if a person is very combative, but the needles are usually made of high tensile strength alloys, and will bend rather than outright break. Improper IV technique can also cause what is known as a catheter sheer, where the plastic IV straw can break off from the hub and become an embolism. It's the reason why they're all radioopaque now.

RoyBatty: Thank you. Are there titer tests for most vaccines?


For several diseases there are, such as MMR, Chickenpox, Yellow Fever, Smallpox Vaccination, and Hep A/B vaccine. Tetanus is a special case, because it only provides temporary immunity against tetanus toxoid. Did you have a reaction to DTap or another vaccine?
 
2014-04-13 12:05:38 AM  

meat0918: twistedmetal: Meh, boosters are made for a reason, too bad no one thinks to get them.

I have my TDaP and my flu shot.

MMR is what I need to get, but I pass out, so I have to make a doctor's appointment cause they won't give it to me at Target anymore.

Also, if the antivaccination stuff keeps up, they will just go back to forced in school vaccination, like how we eradicated polio in this country.


And the anti-vaxxers move their kids to private school/homeschool. A lot of them are already doing that.
 
2014-04-13 12:06:06 AM  

meat0918: hardinparamedic: mikaloyd: All we know for sure is that vaccination enthusiasts are some very angry posters on FARK. Must be from getting stuck with needles all the time.

Pick your favorite color. :)

[img.fark.net image 850x478]

Are those really different colored needles?!?!?

Man, I hate nbeedasles *thud*


The orange ones are the 14 gauge, (that's the biggest diameter) IIRC, she said helpfully.
 
2014-04-13 12:07:30 AM  
The only vaccine I need is Jesus Christ.
 
2014-04-13 12:08:36 AM  

milkyshirt: meat0918: twistedmetal: Meh, boosters are made for a reason, too bad no one thinks to get them.

I have my TDaP and my flu shot.

MMR is what I need to get, but I pass out, so I have to make a doctor's appointment cause they won't give it to me at Target anymore.

Also, if the antivaccination stuff keeps up, they will just go back to forced in school vaccination, like how we eradicated polio in this country.

And the anti-vaxxers move their kids to private school/homeschool. A lot of them are already doing that.


I am actually not that worried.

In England, after Wakefield published his now discredited and fraudulent research so he could sell his own measles shot and diagnostic tool for autism, rates dropped.  They picked back up after people started getting measles again.

I just hope no one ends up dead because of this idiocy.
 
2014-04-13 12:11:18 AM  

meat0918: I just hope no one ends up dead because of this idiocy.


I know of one locally this year.
 
2014-04-13 12:12:05 AM  

wildcardjack: JoieD'Zen: Frederick: I had the measles (and chicken pox) as a kid.  It's not polio or aids.  Quit being pussies.  And take your damn bicycle helmet off, your riding on the farking bike path.

It wasn't uncommon for parents (50-60's) to expose their kids to another that was sick with mumps or chickenpox so they would get it and be immune.
No helmets and setbelts either.
None of us died or had all these bs 'disorders' either.

I've been reading 1920s Popular Mechanics. Everyone could go out and buy a box of dynamite, white lead, and pound of carbide for making acetylene.


Well, dynamite requires a license now.

But here's your carbide, and white lead.  Careful with those, it's illegal to use them for some things.
 
2014-04-13 12:12:40 AM  

JoieD'Zen: Suck it herd people. Why have the vaccines if you can still get the disease?


Why have seatbelts if you're a moron?
 
2014-04-13 12:13:08 AM  

JoieD'Zen: Wild Eyed and Wicked: When I was a kid, we lived in a little town with one doctor. I was diagnosed with measles twice. When I was 15, I fell ill and them broke out head to toe in this horrible rash and he again diagnosed me with measles. When my mother told him I had already had them twice, he stated that it was impossible. My mother them told h that he diagnosed me both times and then promptly to me to a emergency room. I actually had toxic shock syndrome that time. Who know what I had the other times...

It's people like you and your TSS that got Rely tampons pulled. I hope you're happy.


I know - those damned things were were the best at their job. Dammit it to Hell that I tried to die and then found myself having to use tampax. Sucks being a girl sometimes.
 
2014-04-13 12:13:08 AM  

hardinparamedic: Oh yes they can. Neonatal herpes leads to herpes sepsis and herpes encephalopathy.


Neonatal? It's like saying "Water burns on the sun." On one hand, you're technically correct. On the other hand it's a pointless triva because EVERYTHING burns on the sun. BABIES DIE BECAUSE THEY HAVE NO IMMUNE SYSTEM YET! That's why morons think there were no old people in the past. Back in the day, you'd lose kids all the time to everything and thus statistics on averages are horribly skewed to young deaths. And immunocompromised also doesn't count because with no immune system your own guts will eat you alive from the inside. Again, anything can and will kill you. Basically it makes you into a baby again.


But in general herpes is nothing unless it goes full shingles. Even then adults don't tend to die of it, just wish to. But elephant herpes does the same thing to otherwise healthy elephants. It's got a fatality rate of 80% so far in serious cases. Not exactly a cold sore, is it?

And all this encephlepholophugus crap ain't nothing anyway. Everyone dies of something. The real scary thing is that the diseases can take over your brain meats, make you act in ways you otherwise wouldn't, and no one's looking into it in humans (that I know of). We know all kinds of parasites and pathogens that alter behavior. But I'm 100% convinced that, much like a bot net, even colds and flu take over your brain and make you seek out company, ride the bus, and forget to wash your hands. Not like a compulsion from god level of domination, just a subtle influence.
 
2014-04-13 12:13:14 AM  

hardinparamedic: meat0918: I just hope no one ends up dead because of this idiocy.

I know of one locally this year.


We had one flu related death here.  Kid.  Vaccinated too, but his parents were not because of money issues.  Neither his brother or sister who were also vaccinated got sick.  Mom blames herself, implored other parents to not do what she did and get vaccinated when your kids do.
 
2014-04-13 12:13:52 AM  

Lsherm: jmcgeathy: Naw, you were more downplaying the seriousness of chickenpox, which on it's own is for most people an annoyance.. until they get shingles. I've seen that put men on their knees crying for Vicodin. It sucks.

Well, never had shingles, but it's my understanding that if you get chickenpox for the first time as an adult it's even worse, so perhaps parents in the 60's and 70's were on to something.


Well, yeah. In the 70s (when they definitely did not have a vaccine) people wanted their kids to have it as young as possible, because it was one of those things you were going to get in your lifetime and everyone knew that it gets worse as you get older. You'd also especially want girls to have it as children, because chicken pox and pregnancy is really no bueno. Since everyone was going to get the virus at some point, shingles wasn't really something anyone would have thought of when weight the risks vs benefits of exposing their kid.

Prior to the measles and mumps vaccines people intentionally exposed children too. Yes, those had higher chances of complications, but they were also things that most everyone was exposed to at some point, so you might as well get it over with for all the kids in the house/family/neighborhood. It saved having your home quarantined 4 different times.
 
2014-04-13 12:15:57 AM  

doglover: hardinparamedic: Oh yes they can. Neonatal herpes leads to herpes sepsis and herpes encephalopathy.

Neonatal? It's like saying "Water burns on the sun." On one hand, you're technically correct. On the other hand it's a pointless triva because EVERYTHING burns on the sun. BABIES DIE BECAUSE THEY HAVE NO IMMUNE SYSTEM YET! That's why morons think there were no old people in the past. Back in the day, you'd lose kids all the time to everything and thus statistics on averages are horribly skewed to young deaths. And immunocompromised also doesn't count because with no immune system your own guts will eat you alive from the inside. Again, anything can and will kill you. Basically it makes you into a baby again.


But in general herpes is nothing unless it goes full shingles. Even then adults don't tend to die of it, just wish to. But elephant herpes does the same thing to otherwise healthy elephants. It's got a fatality rate of 80% so far in serious cases. Not exactly a cold sore, is it?

And all this encephlepholophugus crap ain't nothing anyway. Everyone dies of something. The real scary thing is that the diseases can take over your brain meats, make you act in ways you otherwise wouldn't, and no one's looking into it in humans (that I know of). We know all kinds of parasites and pathogens that alter behavior. But I'm 100% convinced that, much like a bot net, even colds and flu take over your brain and make you seek out company, ride the bus, and forget to wash your hands. Not like a compulsion from god level of domination, just a subtle influence.


Are you a nihilist?
 
2014-04-13 12:16:03 AM  
I went for like a decade carrying around papers saying that if I was injured they needed to give me tetanus immunoglobulin because I'd had a really bad reaction to the vaccine when I was 10 and my doctor said it was safer not to risk it again. Whenever I'd go to the health department for travel vaccines they'd act like I was being an anti-vaxxer because of that one shot, even though I was there having them stick me full of holes (and even had to argue with them once because the CDC said I needed the polio shot for India and they didn't think I needed it even though the Yellow Book said the oral vaccine didn't work for that strain).

Eventually got sick of worrying about getting injured while traveling somewhere that didn't have quick access to the immunoglobulin and got a tetanus booster, had to hang out in the doctor's office lobby for a good long time to make sure I didn't go into anaphylaxis over it. I still don't know why it made me so sick as a kid that the doctor said not to get another one. It's good I did though, consider that I ended up in a Vietnamese emergency room with my eye split open from a motorcycle crash a couple years later.
 
2014-04-13 12:16:52 AM  

hardinparamedic: Ambivalence: do IV and injection needles ever break off in people?

It can happen if a person is very combative, but the needles are usually made of high tensile strength alloys, and will bend rather than outright break. Improper IV technique can also cause what is known as a catheter sheer, where the plastic IV straw can break off from the hub and become an embolism. It's the reason why they're all radioopaque now.

RoyBatty: Thank you. Are there titer tests for most vaccines?

For several diseases there are, such as MMR, Chickenpox, Yellow Fever, Smallpox Vaccination, and Hep A/B vaccine. Tetanus is a special case, because it only provides temporary immunity against tetanus toxoid. Did you have a reaction to DTap or another vaccine?


I had Guillain-Barre about 10 years ago. There have been a couple of times I've sought out vaccinations, but my doctors said "nuh, uh, not yours".

But I am vaguely worried that I haven't had a tetanus booster in years and just punctured myself with a mostly clean knife.

(
This has tended to yield rage comments against me, but because I had GBS, I tend to:
+ support vaccination (I rely on herd immunity)
+ greatly support outreach and education programs
+ support informed consent between patient and doctor
+ support opt-in vaccination programs (not opt-out)
+ support even philosophical opt out
+ favor mandatory vaccinations for limited diseases that can affect the pregnant, fetus, elderly and infirmed; or that occur very swiftly before someone has a good chance of getting to a doctor, or that can threaten a school population (with absence).
)
 
2014-04-13 12:19:20 AM  

rynthetyn: Eventually got sick of worrying about getting injured while traveling somewhere that didn't have quick access to the immunoglobulin and got a tetanus booster, had to hang out in the doctor's office lobby for a good long time to make sure I didn't go into anaphylaxis over it. I still don't know why it made me so sick as a kid that the doctor said not to get another one. It's good I did though, consider that I ended up in a Vietnamese emergency room with my eye split open from a motorcycle crash a couple years later.


There are several different types of Tetanus vaccine, and the combination vaccines have changed several times in composition and formulation over the past 20 years alone. The combination vaccines are usually used because they also give a booster to things like Diphtheria and Pertussis, which as adults many don't have immunity or resistance anymore from their pediatric shots to and can function as carriers. The single Tetanus vaccine does exist, but it's rarely given outside of specific circumstances.

Or they might have figured that it had been so long that you had been desensitized to whatever caused the reaction in the first place.
 
2014-04-13 12:20:50 AM  

we'refromthesamestory: Omfg. Vaccinations don't mean immunity. They mean reaistance. All vaccinations in general are doing is creating superbacteria that is one day going to kill us all.


I thought this was well known.

So, not only do they endanger our children, they are totally useless!

/*sigh*
 
2014-04-13 12:21:49 AM  

rynthetyn: I went for like a decade carrying around papers saying that if I was injured they needed to give me tetanus immunoglobulin because I'd had a really bad reaction to the vaccine when I was 10 and my doctor said it was safer not to risk it again. Whenever I'd go to the health department for travel vaccines they'd act like I was being an anti-vaxxer because of that one shot, even though I was there having them stick me full of holes (and even had to argue with them once because the CDC said I needed the polio shot for India and they didn't think I needed it even though the Yellow Book said the oral vaccine didn't work for that strain).

Eventually got sick of worrying about getting injured while traveling somewhere that didn't have quick access to the immunoglobulin and got a tetanus booster, had to hang out in the doctor's office lobby for a good long time to make sure I didn't go into anaphylaxis over it. I still don't know why it made me so sick as a kid that the doctor said not to get another one. It's good I did though, consider that I ended up in a Vietnamese emergency room with my eye split open from a motorcycle crash a couple years later.


So, you didn't get sick from the tetanus vaccine as an adult?
 
2014-04-13 12:22:28 AM  

meat0918: milkyshirt: meat0918: twistedmetal: Meh, boosters are made for a reason, too bad no one thinks to get them.

I have my TDaP and my flu shot.

MMR is what I need to get, but I pass out, so I have to make a doctor's appointment cause they won't give it to me at Target anymore.

Also, if the antivaccination stuff keeps up, they will just go back to forced in school vaccination, like how we eradicated polio in this country.

And the anti-vaxxers move their kids to private school/homeschool. A lot of them are already doing that.

I am actually not that worried.

In England, after Wakefield published his now discredited and fraudulent research so he could sell his own measles shot and diagnostic tool for autism, rates dropped.  They picked back up after people started getting measles again.

I just hope no one ends up dead because of this idiocy.


I think a lot of people (particularly kids) are going to have to have a real bad time before the anti-vax crowd gets a clue.

I hope I'm wrong. It seems like there's been a flood of vaccine articles in my Facebook feed lately, which is a magnet for those people. It's a topic I'm passionate about and I have a hard time resisting the urge to argue with them. And then I spend way too much time dwelling on how willingly ignorant some people want to be, and then I feel depressed and defeated. Because it's harmful to innocent people I can't just laugh at them. It makes me too angry.
 
2014-04-13 12:23:59 AM  

RoyBatty: I had Guillain-Barre about 10 years ago. There have been a couple of times I've sought out vaccinations, but my doctors said "nuh, uh, not yours".


OH! That explains a lot then. While there is some evidence linking GBS with certain vaccines, such as the 70s variant H1N1 vaccine and Tdap vaccine, there is also contrary evidence that it was not related to vaccines, but rather coincidental.

So to be on the safe side, they don't vaccinate due to the fact that there have been (incredibly) rare relapses of GBS, and due to the nature and severity of the illness that might result from a relapse.

However, for a clean, shallow and open wound that has been properly treated and cleaned, the risk in the first world is small. Especially if they did teaching of symptoms to look for. Even so, you can get passive Tetanus Toxin Immunoglobulin and be safe.
 
2014-04-13 12:24:10 AM  

meat0918: hardinparamedic: meat0918: I just hope no one ends up dead because of this idiocy.

I know of one locally this year.

We had one flu related death here.  Kid.  Vaccinated too, but his parents were not because of money issues.  Neither his brother or sister who were also vaccinated got sick.  Mom blames herself, implored other parents to not do what she did and get vaccinated when your kids do.


I was at a party recently and asked a few otherwise intelligent people if they'd had the flu vaccine and they looked at me like I'd asked them to  test some sort of new pharmaceutical. There's still a lot of ignorance out there.
 
2014-04-13 12:24:26 AM  
I work for an organization that is against immunity against all deadly contagious diseases.  Like all my co-workers I am fully vaccinated.  Why?  Our goal is to reduce world population.
 
2014-04-13 12:27:04 AM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: JoieD'Zen: Triumph: we'refromthesamestory: All vaccinations in general are doing is creating superbacteria

Please proceed.

Antibiotics lower  natural resistance to all diseases and create the superbugs.

*WHOOSH*


Cool!  So it's just a matter of time before we all start turning into Spider Man.
 
2014-04-13 12:28:27 AM  

Ambivalence: rynthetyn: I went for like a decade carrying around papers saying that if I was injured they needed to give me tetanus immunoglobulin because I'd had a really bad reaction to the vaccine when I was 10 and my doctor said it was safer not to risk it again. Whenever I'd go to the health department for travel vaccines they'd act like I was being an anti-vaxxer because of that one shot, even though I was there having them stick me full of holes (and even had to argue with them once because the CDC said I needed the polio shot for India and they didn't think I needed it even though the Yellow Book said the oral vaccine didn't work for that strain).

Eventually got sick of worrying about getting injured while traveling somewhere that didn't have quick access to the immunoglobulin and got a tetanus booster, had to hang out in the doctor's office lobby for a good long time to make sure I didn't go into anaphylaxis over it. I still don't know why it made me so sick as a kid that the doctor said not to get another one. It's good I did though, consider that I ended up in a Vietnamese emergency room with my eye split open from a motorcycle crash a couple years later.

So, you didn't get sick from the tetanus vaccine as an adult?


 Nope, most likely because it had been changed since I got sick from it as a kid, though there's no way of really knowing. They never were 100% sure if it was the vaccine that made me sick or if it had something to do with the whole falling out of a jungle gym and ripping my arm open, which was why I got the shot in the first place.
 
2014-04-13 12:29:21 AM  

hardinparamedic: RoyBatty: I had Guillain-Barre about 10 years ago. There have been a couple of times I've sought out vaccinations, but my doctors said "nuh, uh, not yours".

OH! That explains a lot then. While there is some evidence linking GBS with certain vaccines, such as the 70s variant H1N1 vaccine and Tdap vaccine, there is also contrary evidence that it was not related to vaccines, but rather coincidental.

So to be on the safe side, they don't vaccinate due to the fact that there have been (incredibly) rare relapses of GBS, and due to the nature and severity of the illness that might result from a relapse.

However, for a clean, shallow and open wound that has been properly treated and cleaned, the risk in the first world is small. Especially if they did teaching of symptoms to look for. Even so, you can get passive Tetanus Toxin Immunoglobulin and be safe.


My GBS came on slowly, it took at least a month before I was mostly paralyzed. But some incidents come on within a few hours. And apparently having had it once, makes it more likely for it to recur. This sometimes leads to some interesting hours for me if for whatever reason, fatigue, or a cold or whatever, I start feeling pins and needles or numbness in extremities. "Did I sleep on my neck funny, or is it GBS?".

Come Monday, I will call up my doc and talk about options.
 
2014-04-13 12:32:13 AM  
Huh. This is easily one of the derpiest (yep, that's a word now) threads I've ever seen outside of the Politics tab. Well done, anti-vaxxers, seriously. Keep it up and we'll regress to the days when idiots like Charles Meigs would passionately argue against HAND WASHING FOR DOCTORS because, "doctors are gentlemen, and gentlemen's hands are always clean."

/it's alright, just keep telling yourselves that you know what you're talking about...
 
2014-04-13 12:34:23 AM  

That Guy What Stole the Bacon: Huh. This is easily one of the derpiest (yep, that's a word now) threads I've ever seen outside of the Politics tab. Well done, anti-vaxxers, seriously. Keep it up and we'll regress to the days when idiots like Charles Meigs would passionately argue against HAND WASHING FOR DOCTORS because, "doctors are gentlemen, and gentlemen's hands are always clean."

/it's alright, just keep telling yourselves that you know what you're talking about...


You think this is derpy? You obviously have not experienced derpy.
 
2014-04-13 12:35:08 AM  
Unless this girl had clearance for and worked in a biosafety 2+ lab (fairly high security and no non-bioworkers allowed) then either she has magical psionic bacteria-creating powers or she  got it from another vector, something that universal vaccination would have significantly reduced the chances of.

Do they not teach the basic principles of vector transmission in middle school in subby's home state anymore?  Where the fark is he from, Kansas?
 
2014-04-13 12:35:40 AM  

hardinparamedic: rynthetyn: Eventually got sick of worrying about getting injured while traveling somewhere that didn't have quick access to the immunoglobulin and got a tetanus booster, had to hang out in the doctor's office lobby for a good long time to make sure I didn't go into anaphylaxis over it. I still don't know why it made me so sick as a kid that the doctor said not to get another one. It's good I did though, consider that I ended up in a Vietnamese emergency room with my eye split open from a motorcycle crash a couple years later.

There are several different types of Tetanus vaccine, and the combination vaccines have changed several times in composition and formulation over the past 20 years alone. The combination vaccines are usually used because they also give a booster to things like Diphtheria and Pertussis, which as adults many don't have immunity or resistance anymore from their pediatric shots to and can function as carriers. The single Tetanus vaccine does exist, but it's rarely given outside of specific circumstances.

Or they might have figured that it had been so long that you had been desensitized to whatever caused the reaction in the first place.


It was close to 20 years after the shot that made me sick, so I'm sure it had changed if it's changed a few times. I know that I'd gotten a stand alone diphtheria booster at some point. When I did finally get the tetanus one it was the stand alone version because I've been vaccinated for everything else.

I think the only things I haven't been vaccinated for at this point are Yellow Fever, Rabies, and Japanese Encephalitis.
 
2014-04-13 12:36:52 AM  
Thanks guys. I didn't want to sleep tonight at all.
 
2014-04-13 12:36:59 AM  

hardinparamedic:

Are you a nihilist?


No, but I am a pragmatist. Honey is an amazing product. You can go down to egypt, dig up a mummy's tomb, and if there's any offerings of honey left over you can probably still eat it. I wouldn't, but you can do this thing. It's amazingly antimicrobial. In fact, there's only one harmless pathogen that hangs out in honey, but it can kill babies. Something that never spoils is usually already spoiled to babies. But once they grow up, crank out a few T cells and get some dirt on 'em, they're good to go.

QED Outside of pediatrics, it's easy to discount any illnesses that kills only babies as non-fatal because everything can potentially kill babies, even honey.
 
2014-04-13 12:37:13 AM  

That Guy What Stole the Bacon: Huh. This is easily one of the derpiest (yep, that's a word now) threads I've ever seen outside of the Politics tab. Well done, anti-vaxxers, seriously. Keep it up and we'll regress to the days when idiots like Charles Meigs would passionately argue against HAND WASHING FOR DOCTORS because, "doctors are gentlemen, and gentlemen's hands are always clean."

/it's alright, just keep telling yourselves that you know what you're talking about...


Psh. My mother never washed her hands before she put bandaids on mine or my sister's cuts, and we never died from the infections.

/just kidding
//my mother never put bandaids on my cuts
 
2014-04-13 12:38:51 AM  

doglover: QED Outside of pediatrics, it's easy to discount any illnesses that kills only babies as non-fatal because everything can potentially kill babies, even honey.


Unfortunately, there's a significant amount of the population walking around today who are immunocompromised for one reason or another - transplant, cancer treatment, medicine regiment, etc.
 
2014-04-13 12:39:24 AM  

knight_on_the_rail: That Guy What Stole the Bacon: Huh. This is easily one of the derpiest (yep, that's a word now) threads I've ever seen outside of the Politics tab. Well done, anti-vaxxers, seriously. Keep it up and we'll regress to the days when idiots like Charles Meigs would passionately argue against HAND WASHING FOR DOCTORS because, "doctors are gentlemen, and gentlemen's hands are always clean."

/it's alright, just keep telling yourselves that you know what you're talking about...

You think this is derpy? You obviously have not experienced derpy.


Not so much since I swore of the aforementioned Politics tab. I also tend to avoid threads that look like they have potential for massive stupid; this is the first time in a while that I decided to dive in, so I'll certainly accept that I've been missing out ;)
 
2014-04-13 12:41:05 AM  
*swore OFF.

/use the preview button, jackass...
 
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