If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(WTKR)   Admiral Ackbar would like to talk to you about the juicing diet craze   (wtkr.com) divider line 6
    More: Obvious, water content, orange juice, diets, pomegranate juice  
•       •       •

6194 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Apr 2014 at 9:33 AM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-04-12 09:35:03 AM  
2 votes:
So...

It's a Frappe?
2014-04-12 08:24:52 PM  
1 votes:

jaytkay: "When you juice fruits and vegetables, you're "mechanically pulverizing," them, Nelson says. Doing so separates the fiber from the juice."

Do people drink the juice and discard the pulp?


Spinach: use the pulp to make spinach dip.

Carrot: could use pulp to make carrot cake or bread or muffins. I discard it.

Celery: no useful application.

Apples: I no longer juice them. I peel and core them and reduce them in a food processor and add it to the juice. Same with strawberries and blueberries.

Oranges: you could probably use for making sherbet of some other dessert. I discard it.

What I don't use I put out for the animals.
2014-04-12 01:25:01 PM  
1 votes:
I have a juicer and I like the vegetable and fruit juices and combinations which can be made from it.

One thing with your basic juicer (meaning cheap) is that it has to be cleaned after each use, promptly and you better have a small brush to get the pulp out of the filter/cutter.

When you juice various vegetables, the pulp goes into a holding tank. You can remove it and pack it in plastic bags and freeze it to add later to soups and stews as a thickener. Much of the flavor will be gone, but the fiber will mix well along with any nutrients left. Stronger vegetables like onions, celery and green peppers will still have quite a bit of taste left.

You can also add the fiber to smoothies you make.

Fruit pulp can be added to desserts, puddings and even jello. It can be added to pies and even ice cream. Though, macerated, it does loose some taste and, even frozen, you're going to want to use it fairly soon.
Quite some time ago, juicing became The Big Health Craze and juicers of all types popped up ranging from inexpensive to take out a loan to buy one.

Anyone with half a brain, reading the many juicing books which came out, would know that if it sounded too good to be true, it usually was. Yet, there were plenty of actual health benefits to make it interesting.

Smoothies had not been created when the first juicing craze hit, back in the 80's.

Also, fresh juice, especially anything mixed with veggies, doesn't keep well. You usually need to refrigerate it nearly immediately, add a certain amount of lemon juice to retard spoiling or pasteurize it. It will not keep like store bought juices. It will also separate when left alone for a few hours.

It will have an 'earthy' taste and scent that might take some getting used to.

I like to mix carrot with apples, toss in some celery, add lettuce and a few grapes. I make enough to last about a day, meaning less than a quart. If the vegetable is bitter, so will be its juice, so you learn to balance the flavors.

Tomatoes are great. Add in a bit of green pepper. Then the universal apple. Toss in a fresh peach and you have a pleasant drink.

Most 'Juicers' learn real fast NOT to add much onion or garlic. Juicing seems to intensify those flavors. The same with strong root veggies, like parsnips.

Carrots and tomatoes and apples mix well. You can even juice melons -- but with any seedy fruit, often avoid running the seeds through. Most are bitter. Some, like apple seeds, contain a tiny bit of arsenic. Even grape seeds, if you've ever chewed up any, can be bitter so with grapes, the smaller the seeds, the better the juice.

If you wouldn't normally eat the seed of a fruit, then don't toss the seeds in a juicer.
Like smoothies? You can add various juices to them for added flavor, to thin out the mix or just for the heck of it.

Like V-8? You can add both juice and pulp to glasses of it to change the flavor a bit.

There are many healthy things that can be done with juicing -- but it's not a cure-all health diet. It will improve your health and give you some fun in the process.

I use it along with a normal diet.

Juice up some Ginger, dump a tablespoon of the milky results in a glass, add cold ginger ale and you have a spicy, unique tasting drink. Pure ginger juice has a peppery bite to it. If you've ever tasted the soft drink Ginger Beer, you'll know what I mean.

BTW, you Never attempt to juice anything like meat or fish for obvious reasons. If you want pulpy meat, use a blender.

Bananas don't juice very well either due to their texture. Most of any fruits of such a consistency will wind up in the pulp bin. Like Avocados.

Juicing is great, but don't get all fanatical about it. It's better than soda if you have kids and far better than Kool-Aid. You can even cut the mix with seltzer water.

Carrots, juiced, IMO, are better than the whole raw vegetable. Carrots are tough, crunchy and need salt when you eat them raw. Kids probably don't find them all that appealing. They are sweet, though and a great source of vitamins. Plus, juiced carrots can be added to many drinks.

Never juice the carrot greens. They're not edible.

So, juicing is just fine, actually healthy and a nice alternative just so long as you don't go crazy with it.
2014-04-12 11:29:45 AM  
1 votes:
I've seen this "juicing craze" come and go at least three times in my lifetime, and I'm only in my 40s. Every few years some whackadoodle comes out of the woodwork to proclaim that living on a diet of juice has turned them into Superman, made them immune to cancer, and extended their life beyond natural boundaries.

People buy juicers and tons of fruits and veggies. They try. They rave about it at first, and then they get bored with it and realize that even if it does work, it's not worth living life if you don't get to have a cheeseburger or bacon & eggs every once in a while. Then they get bored with the juicing because it's really kind of a hassle, and finally, the juicer ends up stashed in the closet or in a cupboard, never to be used again, and they start buying juice in a bottle from the grocery store.

After a little more time, they're back to coffee and an Egg McMuffin in the morning. Every once in a while they'll have orange juice and think back to their juicing fad, and then they'll take another bite of their McBreakfast or McDinner and go back to normal.
2014-04-12 10:05:19 AM  
1 votes:
I would pay extra for a version of Netflix that doesn't have Fat Sick and Nearly Dead popping up in the documentary queue constantly.
2014-04-12 09:36:41 AM  
1 votes:
Because nothing says cleaning out your system like bombarding it with sugars.
 
Displayed 6 of 6 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report