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(io9)   Why do we work better under pressure? Short answer: We don't   (io9.com) divider line 26
    More: Obvious, Carleton University, individual differences  
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1601 clicks; posted to Geek » on 11 Apr 2014 at 8:03 PM (36 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



26 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-04-11 07:20:14 PM  
i970.photobucket.com
 
2014-04-11 07:22:34 PM  
The pressure you feel exists to give middle-management a reason to look forward to coming to work in the morning.
 
2014-04-11 08:10:43 PM  
Just subby's mom's reasoning to get on top.
 
2014-04-11 08:10:55 PM  
TFA is right, but then there are some of us that don't degrade, under pressure, as most do.  That's the quality we need to admire.
 
2014-04-11 08:14:34 PM  
There are different kinds of pressure.  I'm a terrible(or great?) procrastinator and I always push things off to the last minute but I know I don't do my best work when I have a short deadline.  I get it done, but I don't have time to actually review and edit it.  If I had started earlier I would always do a better job.  But on tests back in school I tended to perform better than I ever would under normal circumstances.  I'd recall things that I didn't think I knew, or work out a way to get the answer that wasn't exactly the way it was done in class.  I never felt stressed by the pressure and was always calm and collected finishing even tests I wasn't prepared for early.  So I would say it is possible to perform better under pressure.
 
2014-04-11 08:25:06 PM  
Speak for yourself, choker.

CSB

My nickname in high school was Clutch.

/CSB
 
2014-04-11 08:39:04 PM  
DNRTFA
I'll get to it later...
 
2014-04-11 08:41:07 PM  
I focus better under pressure.  However, when I'm 100% focused already, additional pressure just tends to make me strip my gears and stop caring.
 
2014-04-11 08:41:57 PM  

Farnn: There are different kinds of pressure.  I'm a terrible(or great?) procrastinator and I always push things off to the last minute but I know I don't do my best work when I have a short deadline.  I get it done, but I don't have time to actually review and edit it.  If I had started earlier I would always do a better job.  But on tests back in school I tended to perform better than I ever would under normal circumstances.  I'd recall things that I didn't think I knew, or work out a way to get the answer that wasn't exactly the way it was done in class.  I never felt stressed by the pressure and was always calm and collected finishing even tests I wasn't prepared for early.  So I would say it is possible to perform better under pressure.


My procrastination made me work better under pressure by default-- I usually couldn't (wouldn't) work without a rapidly approaching deadline.
 
2014-04-11 08:42:25 PM  
Depends on the *type* of pressure.  If I have a decent workload, and things are clicking and I'm getting a lot of shiat done, I find I get into a "zone."  IF I'm under a time crunch, though, it sucks.

Much like the article suggests.
 
2014-04-11 09:11:48 PM  
The word we are looking for is eustress. It's found in ATC towers, fire trucks, race cars, and good concert performers.
 
2014-04-11 09:42:34 PM  
Most of the "pressure" I encounter is artificial bullshiat, and let's be honest, it's the bullshiat I don't work well under, or over, or around, or near. And I'm a good bullshiatter with an amazing nose for bullshiat, so don't try to pass it off as a rose. And don't think your "rose" is going to motivate me. Want me to work smarter and harder and longer and better? Give me some actual farking motivation, not some taint waffle bullshiat story about how we have to have this done by 5 p.m. because somebody I don't know, working at some company I don't give a shiat about, needs to have it by then or else. Got cash? Yeah, I think I can work longer hours for that? Susie might lose all her toes if I don't have this form submitting to Salesforce in 30 minutes? fark Susie, and fark each and everyone of her little blackened toes, fark you, fark your kids, fark that piece of shiat car you drive to work in, and fark you again.
 
2014-04-11 10:45:30 PM  
This is our last dance....
 
2014-04-11 11:00:20 PM  
Applying pressure on an employee is meaningless if they aren't also made to be afraid.

Fear garners results.
 
2014-04-11 11:47:26 PM  

TomD9938: Applying pressure on an employee is meaningless if they aren't also made to be afraid.

Fear garners results.


...and holds the local systems in line.
 
2014-04-12 12:11:41 AM  

ParallelUniverseParking: TomD9938: Applying pressure on an employee is meaningless if they aren't also made to be afraid.

Fear garners results.

...and holds the local systems in line.


The more you tighten your grip, the more cubicles will slip through your fingers.

Or something.
 
2014-04-12 12:38:25 AM  
Yeah.  My first thought was that some people perform better under pressure because that's the only time they perform at all.

CSB
I am fairly well known in my company for pulling off some tasks in extraordinarily short time.  Because of this, my manager decided one day to put me a tiger team that was looking into an issue that came up a couple months before a customer review.  I was abysmally useless on it.  In retrospect I realized that my speed in earlier projects was precisely because I didn't do any significant work pressure.  I put in the time early to get the major parts of the system working right, so that when the deadline loomed I was cutting corners on mere minor details.  That way of working, however, was not suitable for something like a tiger team where quick judgments are necessary.
/CSB
 
2014-04-12 12:57:18 AM  

aerojockey: Yeah. My first thought was that some people perform better under pressure because that's the only time they perform at all.


This.  If there's actually "no pressure" shiat never gets done.  So, we do indeed work better under pressure, how much is the key.

What the article doesn't take into account, is that if you're employed, there is always some pressure present.  If you don't do your work, you get demoted or fired completely.  In fact, rare is the time even in your home life that there's no pressure.(and when that is the case, you're some slob of a hoarder or some such because you're not functioning like a normal human being)

And, there doesn't need to be a study to demonstrate that some people work better under pressure.  It's something that many of us see on a daily basis.  It's like saying it's preposterous that the sun will come up every day, because no one's done a study.  It's called "ordinary observation".  That is how you can tell someone like the cited expert is sort of coasting on a degree, demonstrable loss of rational thought and disconnect from reality.

We are a competitive species, we commonly rise to a challenge, whether it's external or internal in origin.
 
2014-04-12 02:41:13 AM  

omeganuepsilon: aerojockey: Yeah. My first thought was that some people perform better under pressure because that's the only time they perform at all.

This.  If there's actually "no pressure" shiat never gets done.  So, we do indeed work better under pressure, how much is the key.

What the article doesn't take into account, is that if you're employed, there is always some pressure present.  If you don't do your work, you get demoted or fired completely.  In fact, rare is the time even in your home life that there's no pressure.(and when that is the case, you're some slob of a hoarder or some such because you're not functioning like a normal human being)

And, there doesn't need to be a study to demonstrate that some people work better under pressure.  It's something that many of us see on a daily basis.  It's like saying it's preposterous that the sun will come up every day, because no one's done a study.  It's called "ordinary observation".  That is how you can tell someone like the cited expert is sort of coasting on a degree, demonstrable loss of rational thought and disconnect from reality.

We are a competitive species, we commonly rise to a challenge, whether it's external or internal in origin.


Wrong, wrong and wrong on so many levels.

Employment = pressure -- wrong.  Ever heard of nepotism?

Home life -- same thing.   In a house with servants, who feels the pressure?

We are also a cooperative species; hence your cooperation in allowing me to win this argument.

/Rising to the challenge!
 
2014-04-12 07:12:19 AM  
Dipshiat.
 
2014-04-12 07:40:56 AM  
*shrugs* pressure is pressure, i guess i learned to compartmentalize that stuff growing up because i procrastinated on literally almost anything and everything i could possibly procrastinate on

as an adult though, i get right to work on stuff as soon as i can, and usually finish pretty quickly too... i suppose that could be from mental conditioning of dealing with the pressure to finish projects quickly
 
2014-04-12 08:17:51 AM  
Growing up I always thought of my Dad as a pretty scary guy.  He was ex-military/Vietnam vet who probably read the Drill Sargent's guide to raising children.  One of the most valuable things I learned from him was how to handle pressure.

If you work at a desk in an office, guess what?  You've got it easy.  The only pressure you feel is that pressure you allow yourself to feel.  I have no problem explaining, calmly and rationally, to my manager or my clients that I have one pace at which I can work.  It's my work pace.  I can't speed up and I don't slow down.  When I'm at work, I work.

If you are my manager, your job is to decide *what* I should work on.  And I'll gladly work on whatever.  But I can only get 1 hour of work done in 1 hour of time.  If we're going to miss a deadline....it's not my fault.  I produce what I produce at the rate I produce it.  If you aren't happy with that, fire me.  If you are upset because a project is behind - talk to the people managing the project.  I'm not paid enough to care, nor am in a position to facilitate ensuring the project is on time.
 
2014-04-12 05:01:04 PM  
I'll read this later when I have less time...
 
2014-04-12 05:08:22 PM  
All projects are over budget and out of time.
 
2014-04-12 05:26:03 PM  

MrHappyRotter: Most of the "pressure" I encounter is artificial bullshiat, and let's be honest, it's the bullshiat I don't work well under, or over, or around, or near. And I'm a good bullshiatter with an amazing nose for bullshiat, so don't try to pass it off as a rose. And don't think your "rose" is going to motivate me. Want me to work smarter and harder and longer and better? Give me some actual farking motivation, not some taint waffle bullshiat story about how we have to have this done by 5 p.m. because somebody I don't know, working at some company I don't give a shiat about, needs to have it by then or else. Got cash? Yeah, I think I can work longer hours for that? Susie might lose all her toes if I don't have this form submitting to Salesforce in 30 minutes? fark Susie, and fark each and everyone of her little blackened toes, fark you, fark your kids, fark that piece of shiat car you drive to work in, and fark you again.


I think I love you. You just encapsulated my hatred in ways I have never been able to before.

/fark off
 
2014-04-13 12:32:19 AM  
css: I had taken up a job as a fabricator in a small metal shop that was run by a pair of english brothers. The foreman was some royal marine reject with a rather severe case of OCD and a habit for yelling. He made the shop so unsafe with the screaming and demands. While his brother, my boss would say we needed to have something shipped out in two weeks, the foreman would want it out in a week. He wanted you to get the job done, even if it ment putting your fingers past the guards on the shears and brakes, etc. If you were loading a pallet, you had better say your prayers if you didn't line up everything exactly flush to the imaginary line in his head. I got so stressed out I yelled at him "you can't kill me, I am already dead!" during an argument. It shut him up pretty quickly, though any corrections he felt he needed to make was now started with "I'm not giving you shiat, but,".

One day, he was pressing me to cut these aluminium rungs for a cable tray he was making. I wasn't afforded any time to find a way to do it safely, such as clamping the metal down, etc. I was so stressed out and numb from his crap, that I had no fear at this point. I just didn't care anymore. I held onto the rungs with my thumb and hooked my fingers onto the fence, thus pinching it against the saw. I ended up breaking my left thumb in three places when the metal became jammed in the saw blade and snapped forward, taking my thumb with it. I was off work for 6 weeks because while the doctor said I could return and do light duties, he didn't sign a note saying that. He just signed one saying I needed to be off work completely. The foreman refused to allow me to return until I had a note saying I could do said light duties, due to liability issues. When I finally did return to work, they let me go after about 3 weeks as I wasn't going to put up with his crap anymore.

It never made any sense to me why bosses feel the need to be dicks like that all the time. You can still get quality work done and done by the deadline or beforehand, without being a twat to your employees. The more nervous you are, the more mistakes will be made.
/css
 
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