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(Ecorazzi)   Anthony Bourdain finally admits to appreciating vegetarian cuisine, at least as made in Punjab. "If this is what vegetarianism meant in most of the places that practice it in the West, I'd be at least half as much less of a dick about the subject"   (ecorazzi.com) divider line 141
    More: Amusing, Anthony Bourdain, Punjab, vegetarian cuisine, Bewitched, offal, technical term, Indian food, vegetarians  
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2443 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 11 Apr 2014 at 10:53 AM (23 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-11 12:42:17 PM

Teknowaffle: Hell I knew a girl who gained 40lbs on a raw vegan diet. Not sure how she managed that.


By being raw vegan only when around other people, most likely.
 
2014-04-11 12:44:11 PM

Tyrone Slothrop: For some reason many vegetarians seem to have forgotten that spices are vegetarian.


Yes! Why is that? Even vegetarian restaurants seem to avoid spices. I understand that certain things deserve to take center stage unadorned -- a perfectly ripe tomato or peach, for example. But the lack of seasoning in so much vegetarian food is weirdly puritanical. You need to build layers of flavor, people.
 
2014-04-11 12:47:26 PM

someonelse: Far Cough: someonelse: I only know a handful of vegetarians well enough to have eaten their food regularly. My limited exposure has taught me that I, an omnivore, like vegetables a lot more than they do. The vegetarians I know don't seem to actually like vegetables all that much. They pretty much just eat rice, pasta, and bread all the time, and their actual veggie intake is limited to a few basic ones. Lettuce, tomatoes, some beans, that's about it.

My theory is that some people are genetically inclined to enjoy food more than others. And the latter group is more represented among vegetarians, because it's easier to take a moral stand when it's less of a personal sacrifice to do it.

That's an amazing theory considering the huge, vast number of omnivores/carnivores who subsist on burgers and fries to the exclusion of everything else.  Limited diet, lack of variety, and avoidance of vegetables can HARDLY be attributed to vegetarians more than carnivores. Everybody has an equal shot at being lazy and eating poorly.  It's just a little easier to do that by scarfing burgers, at least in this culture.

Vegetarians just don't enjoy food?  You're sticking with that one?  'Cause it's nonsense.

Agreed. But I didn't make that claim. Similarly, I didn't say vegetarians don't enjoy food. I theorized that there's a higher representation among vegetarians of people who are less food-oriented. And I gave what I consider to be a pretty logical reason for that. So, yeah, I'm sticking with it.


And I said your "pretty logical reason" just doesn't stand up to any scrutiny.  I realize we're both basically talking out our respective rectums here, but saying that your vegetarian friends don't seem into food isn't much of a basis on which to draw conclusions.  But I guess without data there's not much else I can say.

If I were to similarly guess, I'd have to say it goes completely the other way, because so many meat eaters can and do safely ignore diet and variety, whereas veggies have made a concerted effort to pay attention.  But my guess is as good or bad as yours....
 
2014-04-11 12:49:48 PM

someonelse: Tyrone Slothrop: For some reason many vegetarians seem to have forgotten that spices are vegetarian.

Yes! Why is that? Even vegetarian restaurants seem to avoid spices. I understand that certain things deserve to take center stage unadorned -- a perfectly ripe tomato or peach, for example. But the lack of seasoning in so much vegetarian food is weirdly puritanical. You need to build layers of flavor, people.


I've noticed the division between vegetarians who enjoy good food and vegetarians who eat sh*t corresponds fairly closely with vegetarians who just don't like eating meat and vegetarians who don't like people who eat meat.
 
2014-04-11 12:54:28 PM

Far Cough: saying that your vegetarian friends don't seem into food isn't much of a basis on which to draw conclusions.


Very true. Some of my favorite picnic/bbq/dinner friends are vegetarians and they are total saveurs and wicked cooks.  Though I do understand Bourdain's point about the West, in regards to eating establishments.

I have to say though, that the reason vegetarian options at restaurants are at times dismal is more likely because there's a twatwaffle executive chef with some sort of aesthetic hangup who is making overpriced, underspiced squash and sh*t purely out of malice.
 
2014-04-11 01:03:14 PM

thamike: Far Cough: saying that your vegetarian friends don't seem into food isn't much of a basis on which to draw conclusions.

Very true. Some of my favorite picnic/bbq/dinner friends are vegetarians and they are total saveurs and wicked cooks.  Though I do understand Bourdain's point about the West, in regards to eating establishments.

I have to say though, that the reason vegetarian options at restaurants are at times dismal is more likely because there's a twatwaffle executive chef with some sort of aesthetic hangup who is making overpriced, underspiced squash and sh*t purely out of malice.


Well, yeah, it's pretty clear that most chefs hate vegetarians; Bourdain is hardly an outlier.  It's mostly the culture they've trained and eaten in, but I think it's also simpler things like practicality and economics.  Meat is a huge crowd pleaser, the dishes often take far LESS work, they're known quantities, and appeal to the vast majority of their less-picky clientele.  Great vegetarian dishes take work, and in a brew pub they're just not going to get the demand to make it worthwhile.  That's why I'm always grateful when there are some decent vegetarian options.  The last thing I want to do is ask a kitchen to cook something special.  No need to be a pain in the ass.  If in doubt, get some fries and a salad and grab a burrito or pizza on the way home.  Not the end of the world.
 
2014-04-11 01:03:15 PM

thamike: you'd have to be f*cking high to think eggs are "100% vegetarian."


Eggs are 100% OK for your standard vegetarian diet.

Please learn more about what you are talking about before shiatting all over the internet.
 
2014-04-11 01:05:05 PM
As a pretty hardcore carnivore I can honestly say I've had some pretty slammin' vegetarian food a good few times.


Bourdain, as always, can go eat a bag of dicks.  He's an effete snob and a weak bully.
 
2014-04-11 01:07:40 PM

Superjew: Eggs are 100% OK for your standard vegetarian diet.

Please learn more about what you are talking about before shiatting all over the internet.


Read the thread before you comment, and your sh*t won't have to touch my sh*t.
 
2014-04-11 01:09:16 PM

stonelotus: As a pretty hardcore carnivore I can honestly say I've had some pretty slammin' vegetarian food a good few times.


Bourdain, as always, can go eat a bag of dicks.  He's an effete snob and a weak bully.


Eating a bag of dicks is more Andrew Zimmern's thing.
 
2014-04-11 01:12:10 PM
When I moved to Las Vegas, there was exactly one vegan restaurant. They not only hated meat, they refused to use any spices. Took a vegan GF there once, never went back. The only vegetarian cookbook I use is about 90% Indian, with helpful hints on how to make the dishes without needing hasmat gear.
 
2014-04-11 01:12:33 PM

someonelse: tual veggie intake is limited to a few basic ones. Lettuce, tomatoes, some beans, that's about it.

My theory is that some people are genetically inclined to enjoy food more than others. And the latter g


/newsletter, subscribe....
 
2014-04-11 01:13:39 PM

Superjew: thamike: you'd have to be f*cking high to think eggs are "100% vegetarian."

Eggs are 100% OK for your standard vegetarian diet.

Please learn more about what you are talking about before shiatting all over the internet.


He's confusing vegan with vegetarian, I guess, or claiming that any animal protein violates vegetarianism.  (Though he actually called eggs "meat" above!)

Hey, I'll be the first or second to admit that veganism is a lot easier to understand in a black-or-white way exactly because it's so severe (the anti-honey thing is still ridiculous to me) but, again, there's a very long history of what an ordinary "vegetarian" means, and it's a heck of a lot easier diet than veganism.  People don't need to be dickwads about it just because there's "veg" in the name -- HEY PUT THAT GLASS DOWN, WATER ISN'T A "VEGETABLE", NAH NAH CAUGHT YOU.
 
2014-04-11 01:17:20 PM
In this thread: I learned eggs are meat.
 
2014-04-11 01:18:11 PM

Transpogue: someonelse: I only know a handful of vegetarians well enough to have eaten their food regularly. My limited exposure has taught me that I, an omnivore, like vegetables a lot more than they do. The vegetarians I know don't seem to actually like vegetables all that much. They pretty much just eat rice, pasta, and bread all the time, and their actual veggie intake is limited to a few basic ones. Lettuce, tomatoes, some beans, that's about it.

My theory is that some people are genetically inclined to enjoy food more than others. And the latter group is more represented among vegetarians, because it's easier to take a moral stand when it's less of a personal sacrifice to do it.

I gotta say, you need to hang around some vegetarians and vegans who have access to decent farmer's markets and know how to cook.

I agree that some people just like food more than others and are more inclined to cook good food, but I've found that trait equally shared between omnis and veggie folk.

I've been vegan for about twelve years and my fridge usually has no less than seven varieties of veggies (not counting basic greens) at any given time.  My sauces, condiments, and seasonings are overflowing.  Grains take up the least amount of room in my kitchen.

In short, make some veggie friends who actually LIKE to cook.


THIS
/former vegan
 
2014-04-11 01:18:11 PM

Far Cough: He's confusing vegan with vegetarian, I guess, or claiming that any animal protein violates vegetarianism.  (Though he actually called eggs "meat" above!)


I'm not confusing anything with anything, as I've exhaustively pointed out.  You're the one who said "words mean things" in regards to people whose protein choice is fish.   You can call yourself a vegetarian and eat eggs all you want, i don't give a sh*t.

You just can't call an egg "100% vegetarian" and be correct.  That's usually why vegetarians who do eat eggs say things like, "I'm a vegetarian, but I do eat eggs."  Qualifiers mean things.
 
2014-04-11 01:19:14 PM

thamike: I've noticed the division between vegetarians who enjoy good food and vegetarians who eat sh*t corresponds fairly closely with vegetarians who just don't like eating meat and vegetarians who don't like people who eat meat.


This this thisity this.

I'm not a vegetarian, but I don't have to have meat at every meal or even every day. Sometimes I just want to plow through a whole mess of tasty vegetables cooked right. Sometimes I wanna channel my inner predator. The bonus of being an omnivore is that you can eat just about anything. And the genius of human cooking means that proper preparation, spicing and combination means you can a meal taste fabulous regardless of what's in it.
 
2014-04-11 01:19:26 PM

emocomputerjock: Vodka Zombie: That's probably because Punjab cuisine doesn't rely on crap like soy bratwurst and meat-flavored veggie burgers. Here in the states, we make these veggie knockoffs of meat dishes, and they're rarely worth the trouble

Boca spicy "chicken" patties and Morningstar Farms sausage patties/black bean burgers are the only substitutes worth a damn. Everything else is unenjoyable.

The Crepes of Wrath: Pretty sure he'd still find a way to be a dick.

He knows what makes him money.


I tried to go vegan or vegetarian or something in high school (of course) and I think I really liked seitan? Maybe? Something like that. And yeah, the boca spicy chicken is really good. I actually like veggie burgers too, but I don't really think of them as a substitute for meat. Just a different thing completely. The texture is usually interesting though, and the flavor of a good veggie burger is more interesting, I think.

Must've been vegan because I think that was when I tried carob. Which is horribly if you eat it trying to get fake chocolate, but really good if you just take it for what it is. Weird, though.
 
2014-04-11 01:19:40 PM

costermonger: In this thread: I learned eggs are meat.


Poultry, actually.


Or Pre-Poultry, if you want to get all Minority Report about it.
 
2014-04-11 01:21:01 PM

WinstonWolf: Meat has fat and muscle tissue, right?

Does egg have muscle tissue in it?  /rhetorical.

Eggs are not meat.

Feathers come from chickens too, but they're not meat...

Not going to weigh in on the dietary rules of vegetarians.  Eat what you want.  Call it what you want.

Just don't annoy me by being smug about your diet, whatever you call it, or I will be forced to mock you and be snarky.


No one eats feathers. Are they even digestible?
 
2014-04-11 01:21:34 PM

theorellior: I don't have to have meat at every meal or even every day


People who do kind of put me off.  That's a colontastrophe waiting to happen.
 
2014-04-11 01:22:22 PM

thamike: Far Cough: He's confusing vegan with vegetarian, I guess, or claiming that any animal protein violates vegetarianism.  (Though he actually called eggs "meat" above!)

I'm not confusing anything with anything, as I've exhaustively pointed out.  You're the one who said "words mean things" in regards to people whose protein choice is fish.   You can call yourself a vegetarian and eat eggs all you want, i don't give a sh*t.

You just can't call an egg "100% vegetarian" and be correct.  That's usually why vegetarians who do eat eggs say things like, "I'm a vegetarian, but I do eat eggs."  Qualifiers mean things.


Dude, but that's wrong!  Saying it again doesn't make it right.  Lacto-ovo vegetarianism IS THE STANDARD form of vegetarianism.  It always has been.  That's what it vegetarianism MEANS.  (And I'm not shouting; I just don't love HTML.)   You sound mostly reasonable, but you're just wrong here.
 
2014-04-11 01:22:49 PM
So unfertilized ovum of any species is ok for a vegetarian?
 
2014-04-11 01:26:40 PM

thamike: stonelotus: As a pretty hardcore carnivore I can honestly say I've had some pretty slammin' vegetarian food a good few times.


Bourdain, as always, can go eat a bag of dicks.  He's an effete snob and a weak bully.

Eating a bag of dicks is more Andrew Zimmern's thing.


God I love that man. I would totally marry him and go eat weird things and have lots of money.
 
2014-04-11 01:29:13 PM

Far Cough: Lacto-ovo vegetarianism IS THE STANDARD form of vegetarianism.


But, you felt the need to put the qualifier, right?  There's a reason for that.  Look, i'm done with this particular rabbit hole.  I don't care what people eat as long as it tastes good and it isn't my pet or a friend of mine.  I will never, however point at an egg and call it 100% vegetarian, just like I will never point at a vegetarian and say "HA HA b*tch, I've discovered your secret vault of eggs!"
 
2014-04-11 01:29:40 PM

thamike: People who do kind of put me off. That's a colontastrophe waiting to happen.


People can eat what they please, but what puts me off is people who whine about it. No one's gonna pull your Man Card and you're not gonna die of malnutrition if you end up eating a vegan falafel/hummus wrap or some sweet and sour tofu for lunch.
 
2014-04-11 01:30:23 PM

doloresonthedottedline: God I love that man. I would totally marry him and go eat weird things and have lots of money.


You can tell that guy eats out a mean pussy.  I mean he's gotta be all over that.
 
2014-04-11 01:31:39 PM

thamike: Far Cough: Lacto-ovo vegetarianism IS THE STANDARD form of vegetarianism.

But, you felt the need to put the qualifier, right?  There's a reason for that.  Look, i'm done with this particular rabbit hole.  I don't care what people eat as long as it tastes good and it isn't my pet or a friend of mine.  I will never, however point at an egg and call it 100% vegetarian, just like I will never point at a vegetarian and say "HA HA b*tch, I've discovered your secret vault of eggs!"


Actually, in many parts of the east Eggs are considered meat, and are not considered a part of the vegetarian diet.

So I guess lacto-ovo vegetarianism is the standard one in the west.
 
2014-04-11 01:32:01 PM

theorellior: thamike: People who do kind of put me off. That's a colontastrophe waiting to happen.

People can eat what they please, but what puts me off is people who whine about it. No one's gonna pull your Man Card and you're not gonna die of malnutrition if you end up eating a vegan falafel/hummus wrap or some sweet and sour tofu for lunch.


It's not as common in the wild as it is in internet forums, at least not as common as the JUS' A REGLAR COFFEE guy is at Starbucks.
 
2014-04-11 01:36:17 PM

thamike: Far Cough: Lacto-ovo vegetarianism IS THE STANDARD form of vegetarianism.

But, you felt the need to put the qualifier, right?  There's a reason for that.  Look, i'm done with this particular rabbit hole.  I don't care what people eat as long as it tastes good and it isn't my pet or a friend of mine.  I will never, however point at an egg and call it 100% vegetarian, just like I will never point at a vegetarian and say "HA HA b*tch, I've discovered your secret vault of eggs!"


The "reason for that" is that you don't seem to understand it, or want to understand it.  You're coming from an apparent position of ignorance and absolutely refusing to concede that truth.

You even made me resort to pulling up the definition from the oldest vegetarian group in the western world...

What is a vegetarian?
The Vegetarian Society defines a vegetarian as: "Someone who lives on a diet of grains, pulses, nuts, seeds, vegetables and fruits with, or without, the use of dairy products and eggs. A vegetarian does not eat any meat, poultry, game, fish, shellfish* or by-products of slaughter."

There are different types of vegetarian:
Lacto-ovo-vegetarians eat both dairy products and eggs; this is the most common type of vegetarian diet.


You're also got this thing about calling the egg itself "100% vegetarian" as if had to pass some kind of purity test or something.  The egg doesn't have a diet, and it's not yet a living thing.  It's a bog standard ordinary part of the vegetarian diet for people, no matter how much you like to say otherwise.

Oh, that's right, you're still walking away with your fingers in your ears now, 'cause eggs are still meat 'cause you say so.  Ciao.
 
2014-04-11 01:39:08 PM

theorellior: thamike: People who do kind of put me off. That's a colontastrophe waiting to happen.

People can eat what they please, but what puts me off is people who whine about it. No one's gonna pull your Man Card and you're not gonna die of malnutrition if you end up eating a vegan falafel/hummus wrap or some sweet and sour tofu for lunch.


I would say vegetarians/vegans are more vocal about it than omnivore/carnivores.

If I do not want to eat something, and I will tell you, I do not eat or want that, I will just say no.  I do not need a long winded explanation about animals, mother earth, or why it is good for me.  If I do not like something I do not like it.

However, many non meat eaters will lecture you for hours on end about their food customs and why they are superior.

I would say vegetables are about 90% of my diet, but I do eat steak or chicken at least once a week.

However, I can cook and use seasonings well for my vegetables, and most tend to come out of my garden.

Without a bit of animal protein I tend to feel run down.
 
2014-04-11 01:40:42 PM

thamike: It's not as common in the wild as it is in internet forums, at least not as common as the JUS' A REGLAR COFFEE guy is at Starbucks.


When I lived in Texas it was very common. If people weren't eating an entire spit-roasted pig for every meal then SOMETHING WAS WRONG.
 
2014-04-11 01:44:03 PM

Far Cough: If I were to similarly guess, I'd have to say it goes completely the other way, because so many meat eaters can and do safely ignore diet and variety, whereas veggies have made a concerted effort to pay attention. But my guess is as good or bad as yours....


See, the only direct comparison I made between vegetarians and non-vegetarians was my theory that people who aren't that into cooking and eating for pleasure are more likely to become vegetarians, for the sole reason that taking a moral stand against eating animals is easier for those people. I didn't claim that the diet of meat-eaters as a whole is any more diverse than the diet of vegetarians. I don't think it is. An awful lot of people eat the same 6 or 7 foods all the time. My observation was that I wouldn't expect vegetarians to be anti-vegetable, and yet quite a few of them are.
 
2014-04-11 01:44:16 PM

Far Cough: thamike: Far Cough: Lacto-ovo vegetarianism IS THE STANDARD form of vegetarianism.

But, you felt the need to put the qualifier, right?  There's a reason for that.  Look, i'm done with this particular rabbit hole.  I don't care what people eat as long as it tastes good and it isn't my pet or a friend of mine.  I will never, however point at an egg and call it 100% vegetarian, just like I will never point at a vegetarian and say "HA HA b*tch, I've discovered your secret vault of eggs!"

The "reason for that" is that you don't seem to understand it, or want to understand it.  You're coming from an apparent position of ignorance and absolutely refusing to concede that truth.

You even made me resort to pulling up the definition from the oldest vegetarian group in the western world...

What is a vegetarian?
The Vegetarian Society defines a vegetarian as: "Someone who lives on a diet of grains, pulses, nuts, seeds, vegetables and fruits with, or without, the use of dairy products and eggs. A vegetarian does not eat any meat, poultry, game, fish, shellfish* or by-products of slaughter."

There are different types of vegetarian:
Lacto-ovo-vegetarians eat both dairy products and eggs; this is the most common type of vegetarian diet.

You're also got this thing about calling the egg itself "100% vegetarian" as if had to pass some kind of purity test or something.  The egg doesn't have a diet, and it's not yet a living thing.  It's a bog standard ordinary part of the vegetarian diet for people, no matter how much you like to say otherwise.

Oh, that's right, you're still walking away with your fingers in your ears now, 'cause eggs are still meat 'cause you say so.  Ciao.


The "oldest in the western world" being the key factor of that statement.  So a group of brits in the 1800s rubber stamped their beliefs onto something they picked up from another culture, so that makes it right?
 
2014-04-11 01:45:27 PM

someonelse: Far Cough: If I were to similarly guess, I'd have to say it goes completely the other way, because so many meat eaters can and do safely ignore diet and variety, whereas veggies have made a concerted effort to pay attention. But my guess is as good or bad as yours....

See, the only direct comparison I made between vegetarians and non-vegetarians was my theory that people who aren't that into cooking and eating for pleasure are more likely to become vegetarians, for the sole reason that taking a moral stand against eating animals is easier for those people. I didn't claim that the diet of meat-eaters as a whole is any more diverse than the diet of vegetarians. I don't think it is. An awful lot of people eat the same 6 or 7 foods all the time. My observation was that I wouldn't expect vegetarians to be anti-vegetable, and yet quite a few of them are.


Okay... fight's all gone out of me at this point.  I should eat a steak.
 
2014-04-11 01:46:14 PM
I could swear I saw him praising Indian veggie cuisine years ago, so I don't think this is new.
 
2014-04-11 01:47:52 PM

theflatline: Far Cough: thamike: Far Cough: Lacto-ovo vegetarianism IS THE STANDARD form of vegetarianism.

But, you felt the need to put the qualifier, right?  There's a reason for that.  Look, i'm done with this particular rabbit hole.  I don't care what people eat as long as it tastes good and it isn't my pet or a friend of mine.  I will never, however point at an egg and call it 100% vegetarian, just like I will never point at a vegetarian and say "HA HA b*tch, I've discovered your secret vault of eggs!"

The "reason for that" is that you don't seem to understand it, or want to understand it.  You're coming from an apparent position of ignorance and absolutely refusing to concede that truth.

You even made me resort to pulling up the definition from the oldest vegetarian group in the western world...

What is a vegetarian?
The Vegetarian Society defines a vegetarian as: "Someone who lives on a diet of grains, pulses, nuts, seeds, vegetables and fruits with, or without, the use of dairy products and eggs. A vegetarian does not eat any meat, poultry, game, fish, shellfish* or by-products of slaughter."

There are different types of vegetarian:
Lacto-ovo-vegetarians eat both dairy products and eggs; this is the most common type of vegetarian diet.

You're also got this thing about calling the egg itself "100% vegetarian" as if had to pass some kind of purity test or something.  The egg doesn't have a diet, and it's not yet a living thing.  It's a bog standard ordinary part of the vegetarian diet for people, no matter how much you like to say otherwise.

Oh, that's right, you're still walking away with your fingers in your ears now, 'cause eggs are still meat 'cause you say so.  Ciao.

The "oldest in the western world" being the key factor of that statement.  So a group of brits in the 1800s rubber stamped their beliefs onto something they picked up from another culture, so that makes it right?


Sigh.  I didn't say it makes it "right", I said that's what the word vegetarian means in English.  Because that's what the word vegetarian means in English.

Because that's what the word vegetarian means in English.

And because that's what the word vegetarian means in English.
 
2014-04-11 01:49:17 PM

SlagginOff: I could swear I saw him praising Indian veggie cuisine years ago, so I don't think this is new.


It isn't.  He definitely lost his sh*t about the astounding variety of delicious chick pea recipes during No Reservations.
 
2014-04-11 01:53:31 PM
South and east Asian cuisines know how to cook their vegetables. Too bad that's not the case in the west.
 
2014-04-11 01:54:18 PM

Far Cough: And because that's what the word vegetarian means in English.


In English, is there a distinction between vegetarian and lacto-ovo vegetarian?  You seem to think so.  So does everybody else, including lacto-ovo vegetarians and vegetarians.

I think the problem here is that you assume I place a negative connotation on "vegetarian,"  which I don't.  My vegetarian friends, for the most part eat eggs.  Some of them don't.  Neither argues with one another about eggs being "100% vegetarian" (my repeated use of that term is based on somebody else's post upthread).  I'm being a semantic asshole, if that makes you feel better, but I was fairly clear about my intent in that regard, so your flabbergasm is a bit unwarranted.
 
2014-04-11 01:58:27 PM

Fallout Boy: South and east Asian cuisines know how to cook their vegetables. Too bad that's not the case in the west.


I blame mass supermarket agriculture.  Sure you can find great things at a supermarket, but honestly, nothing beats a local farm.    The potatoes, watermelons, and (yes) eggs I've eaten from a neighbor's backyard in Greece were bursting with flavor.  Shopping at Safeway can get langoleirish.
 
2014-04-11 02:04:03 PM

thamike: Fallout Boy: South and east Asian cuisines know how to cook their vegetables. Too bad that's not the case in the west.

I blame mass supermarket agriculture.  Sure you can find great things at a supermarket, but honestly, nothing beats a local farm.    The potatoes, watermelons, and (yes) eggs I've eaten from a neighbor's backyard in Greece were bursting with flavor.  Shopping at Safeway can get langoleirish.


I live in Florida and currently have watermelons, korean cucumbers, three types of green beans, creole tomatoes, cabbage, two types of lettuce, carrots, habeneros, jalepenis, pasadillos, tomatillos, cantaloup, and okra all going like gang busters.

I get fresh eggs for free from a coworker because I gave her a 15 seedlings from my garden.  And I live in the middle of town.

i635.photobucket.com
 
2014-04-11 02:05:36 PM

thamike: Far Cough: And because that's what the word vegetarian means in English.

In English, is there a distinction between vegetarian and lacto-ovo vegetarian?  You seem to think so.  So does everybody else, including lacto-ovo vegetarians and vegetarians.

I think the problem here is that you assume I place a negative connotation on "vegetarian,"  which I don't.  My vegetarian friends, for the most part eat eggs.  Some of them don't.  Neither argues with one another about eggs being "100% vegetarian" (my repeated use of that term is based on somebody else's post upthread).  I'm being a semantic asshole, if that makes you feel better, but I was fairly clear about my intent in that regard, so your flabbergasm is a bit unwarranted.


You took the fingers out.  Hi!  To answer your question, NO, there's no distinction between vegetarian and lacto-ovo vegetarian.  That was my entire point, that lacto-ovo was the general, default, bog standard state of vegetarianism.  I haven't wavered from this.  When you say "lacto-ovo vegetarians and vegetarians" you're not making a distinction at all.  How the heck do YOU distinguish between those two terms?  The latter is either equal to the former, or it is used as an umbrella term that STILL includes the former among several other groups.  It's a little like calling a standard 4-door sedan a "car".

Obviously we're BOTH being semantic assholes here; it's just that I'm right.  :)
 
2014-04-11 02:06:38 PM

theflatline: I live in Florida and currently have watermelons, korean cucumbers, three types of green beans, creole tomatoes, cabbage, two types of lettuce, carrots, habeneros, jalepenis, pasadillos, tomatillos, cantaloup, and okra all going like gang busters.

I get fresh eggs for free from a coworker because I gave her a 15 seedlings from my garden.  And I live in the middle of town.


It's happening in NYC, too.  I don't give a damn if the guy wears wool caps in hot weather and plows is roof, farm fresh is the best.
 
2014-04-11 02:09:16 PM
We had some people in a recent thread claiming that "farm fresh eggs" and organic eggs wouldn't pass a double blind test against ordinary factory farmed eggs, or something like that.  I have no idea how true that is.  I don't much like eggs.  :)
 
2014-04-11 02:10:56 PM

Far Cough: NO, there's no distinction between vegetarian and lacto-ovo vegetarian.


That would be a distinction.  The distinction is right there. You typed the distinction.


showbizgeek.com

"You don't like jam, you've never liked jam, you HATE jam."
 
2014-04-11 02:14:13 PM

thamike: Far Cough: NO, there's no distinction between vegetarian and lacto-ovo vegetarian.

That would be a distinction. The distinction is right there. You typed the distinction.


Oh for fark's sake, seriously?  That's what you've got?

There's a distinction between "water" and "wet water".   Gotcha.  'Cause one has more words.  Please.
 
2014-04-11 02:14:54 PM
Okay, people, just get a goddamed room so we can get the thread back.
 
2014-04-11 02:17:07 PM

theorellior: Okay, people, just get a goddamed room so we can get the thread back.


Okay cool.  It's pretty clear the Punjabi cuisine Bourdain likes so much includes TONS of dairy.  Any idea how much egg is included?
 
2014-04-11 02:18:23 PM

theorellior: Okay, people, just get a goddamed room so we can get the thread back.


He will not give you the thread back.
 
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