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(WSOCTV)   Apocalyptic data breach at Experian credit monitoring service may have put 200 million identities at risk for identity theft   (wsoctv.com) divider line 92
    More: Ironic, data breaches, credit monitoring, Experian, Experian credit, credit reporting, financial crimes, Wisconsin Department of Revenue, identity  
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7037 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Apr 2014 at 7:05 AM (35 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-11 12:52:13 AM  
I guess there's something good about having bad credit. Nobody is going to give you a loan. Now that is secure.
 
2014-04-11 01:00:34 AM  
Just did a training on APT.  The company has to get it right 100% of the time.  The attacker only has to get it right once.

it was bound to happen eventually...
 
2014-04-11 07:05:57 AM  

Stoker: I guess there's something good about having bad credit. Nobody is going to give you a loan. Now that is secure.


When ya got nuttin' ... ya got nuttin' to lose...

My university had a breach about 4 years ago, part of the backup tapes fiasco that I believe also involved BoA. I'd just finished my B.S. there, so my data was fresh and current.  University sent me free credit monitoring for a year. The data involved in the breach is pretty much information I cannot change (SS number, address, the demographic data that becomes part of your post-9/11 identity "fingerprint") so monitoring is kind of amusing, useful if you see something happen, but it feels pretty passive as measure go.

I figure my credit rating was crappy but not hideous, but within a few years between the foreclosure crises, and these breaches, the playing field will be level again soon, and they'll have to come up with completely new ways to sell you crap you can't afford if they're going to exclude the credit damaged. We're all going to be in the same, verge LARGE boat, and it won't really matter how you got there.
 
2014-04-11 07:11:34 AM  
Investigators said sometime before March 2012, a Vietnamese man named Hieu Minh Ngo used a false identity to purchase Social Security numbers with a database called Court Ventures, and then sold that information on the international black market.

I'm trying to come up with the scenario where it would have been acceptable for an individual - regardless of name or country of origin - to purchase a massive list of SSN's.
 
2014-04-11 07:12:38 AM  
Subby not familiar with what the word apocalyptic actually means?

Or just getting practice for being a Buzzfeed "writer"?
 
2014-04-11 07:13:29 AM  
Credit frozen, low score, very common name.  Normally I would worry about this kind of thing but that was before 2009 hit and almost took my house while some close friends went bankrupt.  So ... whatever.
 
2014-04-11 07:23:53 AM  
All of these places that have online records of people's personal information need to step up their game.  I am sick of hearing about sh*t about this.  I personally don't conduct any type of personal business online that might  compromise my information, but I certainly feel sorry for people who do and who have their lives ruined by cyber-theft.
 
2014-04-11 07:29:18 AM  
2.bp.blogspot.com
They do a lot more harm than good...
 
2014-04-11 07:31:26 AM  
You mean the assholes that collect my personal info and have the nerve to charge me for it?
 
Skr
2014-04-11 07:32:27 AM  
Hmm. So which credit monitoring service did Target offer their customers after their recent breech?

Oh it was Experian was it?
 
2014-04-11 07:33:07 AM  

Cold_Sassy: All of these places that have online records of people's personal information need to step up their game.  I am sick of hearing about sh*t about this.  I personally don't conduct any type of personal business online that might  compromise my information, but I certainly feel sorry for people who do and who have their lives ruined by cyber-theft.


It doesn't matter if you do, it matters if the companies you deal with do. Unless you've never had a government ID, gotten a loan, or ever given that info to a 2nd party, your info is digitized somewhere and, most likely, vulnerable if not already stolen.
 
2014-04-11 07:35:46 AM  

asquian: Subby not familiar with what the word apocalyptic actually means?


I assumed it means troops massing in the plain of Megiddo.

/DNRTFA
 
2014-04-11 07:36:18 AM  

DoBeDoBeDo: Cold_Sassy: All of these places that have online records of people's personal information need to step up their game.  I am sick of hearing about sh*t about this.  I personally don't conduct any type of personal business online that might  compromise my information, but I certainly feel sorry for people who do and who have their lives ruined by cyber-theft.

It doesn't matter if you do, it matters if the companies you deal with do. Unless you've never had a government ID, gotten a loan, or ever given that info to a 2nd party, your info is digitized somewhere and, most likely, vulnerable if not already stolen.


Well, thank whoever, I've not been victimized so far.  I have a lot of history, but I never do anything involving credit online and not one shred of personal information ever leaves my house intact.
 
2014-04-11 07:37:20 AM  
Whew! I'm not really worried about it now thanks to my TotalFark!

Suck It have-nots (or whatever it is TFers call nonTFers behind their backs.)
 
2014-04-11 07:40:46 AM  
99% of them have less money than you...so....good luck finding the one to steal.
 
2014-04-11 07:41:19 AM  

rev. dave: Credit frozen, low score, very common name.  Normally I would worry about this kind of thing but that was before 2009 hit and almost took my house while some close friends went bankrupt.  So ... whatever.


I have pretty decent credit, but at this point I'm just going to assume that my data is all out there somewhere. Why worry, I guess...
 
2014-04-11 07:42:53 AM  

Cold_Sassy: DoBeDoBeDo: Cold_Sassy: All of these places that have online records of people's personal information need to step up their game.  I am sick of hearing about sh*t about this.  I personally don't conduct any type of personal business online that might  compromise my information, but I certainly feel sorry for people who do and who have their lives ruined by cyber-theft.

It doesn't matter if you do, it matters if the companies you deal with do. Unless you've never had a government ID, gotten a loan, or ever given that info to a 2nd party, your info is digitized somewhere and, most likely, vulnerable if not already stolen.

Well, thank whoever, I've not been victimized so far.  I have a lot of history, but I never do anything involving credit online and not one shred of personal information ever leaves my house intact.


The information you give to these companies is put in their databases.

It doesn't matter how you send them that data. It fact you mailing it or whatever is probably more vulnerable to being stolen in transit
 
2014-04-11 07:45:01 AM  

ThatGuyFromTheInternet: [2.bp.blogspot.com image 717x309]
They do a lot more harm than good...


I'm actually surprised something like that hasn't happened yet to credit or banks with how they have screwed over SO many people and gloat with their wealth.
 
2014-04-11 07:45:33 AM  
This is why I never use my debit card to pay for anything online or in a brick and mortar; only use my credit card. That way, if my card is compromised (which has happened twice in the past two years), there is a very low limit to what the thieves can spend.

They get my debit card number, they'll clean me out.

It ain't foolproof, but it makes me and the missus feel a bit more secure.
 
2014-04-11 07:48:03 AM  
And another thing...why don't these cyber criminals ever go after the bankers and financial guys that screw over the little guy? It seems like it's always some average schmuck how gets hosed when there's a breach like this.

Seems like the 1% would have the deeper pockets to pilfer. Why nickel and dime it?
 
2014-04-11 07:48:53 AM  
FTFA: Officials at Charlotte's Better Business Bureau are also warning victims of the 2013 data breaches at Target and the South Carolina Department of Revenue. Both offered free credit monitoring from Experian to victims of the breaches -- and officials said those victims could be exposed once again.

Oh, man... It's like a bad comedy sketch or something...

Experts said consumers should be monitoring their bank and credit card statements daily, and can sign up for credit monitoring alerts through private companies like LifeLock.

News story in a couple months from now: LifeLock experiences huge data breach exposing info on all consumers they were protecting!
 
2014-04-11 07:49:38 AM  
You mean three massive private companies that sell data on people, have collection agency spin-offs or subsiaries, and all offer for profit credit monitoring. (Which is basically if you pay them extra instead of them just being paid by their lender subscribers they will try a tiny bit harder to ensure their info is accurate. ). Full disclosure I worked for a few weeks at trans unions spin off collection agency in 2005. Was in consumer banking for years and have had some issues with getting questionable and laughably false info off of my credit.
 
2014-04-11 07:50:22 AM  

Cold_Sassy: All of these places that have online records of people's personal information need to step up their game.


You don't understand.  Security, proper security, costs money in terms of both costs to implement and labor to keep staff trained to use the systems properly and not end run them for ease.  Money that is coming from someone's bonus and out of shareholder value.  You are simply a resource that these companies sell.  They don't give a fark if your information is compromised.  What the worst that will happen to these large credit organization if they falter... a bailout from the Feds.  The ones in charge still got their bonuses then too.
 
2014-04-11 07:55:49 AM  

Wolfen067: This is why I never use my debit card to pay for anything online or in a brick and mortar; only use my credit card. That way, if my card is compromised (which has happened twice in the past two years), there is a very low limit to what the thieves can spend.

They get my debit card number, they'll clean me out.

It ain't foolproof, but it makes me and the missus feel a bit more secure.


Best advice so far. Credit cards are much better on fraud/theft than debit cards
 
2014-04-11 07:57:42 AM  
Maybe it's time for an actual national ID that's not your ss number and has some sort of chip and pin type method for access
 
2014-04-11 08:00:38 AM  
"How can we possibly keep all this fake money moving around the world at a faster rate, thus ensuring our ability to create more debt?"

"Turn it all into binary math!"

"And keep it on computers!"

"Then you can just pull it up on a screen.  No paperwork!  No time consuming writing on paper!"

"It's perfect!"

"What could possible go wrong?"

"It's the future!"

"We have solved life!"

*snort*
 
2014-04-11 08:01:22 AM  

xanadian: Just did a training on APT.  The company has to get it right 100% of the time.  The attacker only has to get it right once.

it was bound to happen eventually...


Or like just ask for a username and password to log in to the system.
 
2014-04-11 08:02:29 AM  

wingnut396: Cold_Sassy: All of these places that have online records of people's personal information need to step up their game.

You don't understand.  Security, proper security, costs money in terms of both costs to implement and labor to keep staff trained to use the systems properly and not end run them for ease.  Money that is coming from someone's bonus and out of shareholder value.  You are simply a resource that these companies sell.  They don't give a fark if your information is compromised.  What the worst that will happen to these large credit organization if they falter... a bailout from the Feds.  The ones in charge still got their bonuses then too.


Yes, I realize that because fark us.  I'm just saying that I've been doing stuff primarily by mail my whole life and have yet to suffer any consequences (fellow farkers, please don't consider this a challenge) but thieves who are too lazy to go dig through my trash which never contains personal information and may include some serious retribution if I see you, seems to have been safer than online commerce.
 
hej [TotalFark]
2014-04-11 08:03:03 AM  
Now we just need somebody to hack Lifelock and the circle will be complete.
 
2014-04-11 08:03:50 AM  

loonatic112358: Maybe it's time for an actual national ID that's not your ss number and has some sort of chip and pin type method for access


Smart.  Very smart.
 
2014-04-11 08:05:08 AM  
The North Carolina Attorney General's Office is now joining other states investigating a massive data breach at a credit reporting agency that has put 200 million Social Security numbers at risk.

Oh lookee here, the corporate whoring crooks that run North Carolina are on Experian's case.  I'm sure Experian will sorely miss those plain white envelopes full of baksheesh.

/Ahem, excuse me, "campaign contributions"
 
2014-04-11 08:05:24 AM  

RobSeace: News story in a couple months from now: LifeLock experiences huge data breach exposing info on all consumers they were protecting!


Here's my SSN: 123-45-6789

Try to steal my identity. Go ahead.
 
2014-04-11 08:06:34 AM  

Cold_Sassy: loonatic112358: Maybe it's time for an actual national ID that's not your ss number and has some sort of chip and pin type method for access

Smart.  Very smart.


Yeah, that wont raise any fuss.

1888.org
 
2014-04-11 08:07:41 AM  

RobSeace: FTFA: Officials at Charlotte's Better Business Bureau are also warning victims of the 2013 data breaches at Target and the South Carolina Department of Revenue. Both offered free credit monitoring from Experian to victims of the breaches -- and officials said those victims could be exposed once again.

Oh, man... It's like a bad comedy sketch or something...

Experts said consumers should be monitoring their bank and credit card statements daily, and can sign up for credit monitoring alerts through private companies like LifeLock.

News story in a couple months from now: LifeLock experiences huge data breach exposing info on all consumers they were protecting!


Those LifeLock commercials are about as informative as "Head On.  Apply directly to forehead."  "LifeLock is there" -- what does that mean?  They're going to join the thieves in looting your bank account?
 
2014-04-11 08:07:44 AM  
Every company with SSN and PII data:

encryption?  nah.   we'll just restrict user access.
auditing:    We got this with user access.

6 months later,  212 user accounts with read access

idiot in marketing/PR:
create Access database
select * from customerData;
 
2014-04-11 08:11:44 AM  
Good thing me and the other 0.01%ers have the 14 digit social security number.  Suck it pleebs!
 
2014-04-11 08:13:32 AM  

Wolfen067: And another thing...why don't these cyber criminals ever go after the bankers and financial guys that screw over the little guy? It seems like it's always some average schmuck how gets hosed when there's a breach like this.

Seems like the 1% would have the deeper pockets to pilfer. Why nickel and dime it?


I'm no industry expert, but my guess would be the following:

Wolfen067: This is why I never use my debit card to pay for anything online or in a brick and mortar; only use my credit card. That way, if my card is compromised (which has happened twice in the past two years), there is a very low limit to what the thieves can spend.

They get my debit card number, they'll clean me out.

It ain't foolproof, but it makes me and the missus feel a bit more secure.


The 1% are so rich they don't usually handle money, and when their money is involved it's usually in credit which is then paid off later, and when they absolutely have to use REAL money they do it in cashier's checks or bearer bonds, (which could be described as a different kind of money for rich people, if you were feeling uncharitable).

When something goes wrong they hire a lawyer to blame someone else, and an accountant to sort shiat out, and both of them deal with the problem.  The 99% can do that too, but it takes more time and costs a larger percentage of your savings to do so.  Which is the real problem.  A quote from the article:

The BBB also suggests contacting the other two credit reporting agencies, TransUnion and Equifax, to request that a fraud alert be placed on your individual information, but warns it could cause other difficulties.

"It will basically freeze your credit, so If you want to apply for credit card, a mortgage, or car loan, it's going to make it more difficult," Bartholomy said.


For someone on the raggedy edge, that's crippling, for a 1%er that's a minor inconvenience.

Now, at a guess, I would assume the cyber criminals don't know who they are targeting.  They are just grabbing a name from a hat and running with it.  I guess this because as I mentioned, I'm no industry expert.  In such a situation there is a 1% chance (obviously) that the thief in question will get a 1%er.  So you won't hear about it, most likely, because 99% of the time it was someone else.
 
2014-04-11 08:15:44 AM  

bunner: Cold_Sassy: loonatic112358: Maybe it's time for an actual national ID that's not your ss number and has some sort of chip and pin type method for access

Smart.  Very smart.

Yeah, that wont raise any fuss.

[1888.org image 400x254]


C'mon Bunner, It's like your ATM card.  Just put in a pin number.  If you mean getting a tattoo or RFID chip, then hell no.
 
2014-04-11 08:19:55 AM  
I change my passwords routinely, I use a specific card for online transactions, I never use a debit card, I check my credit reports every year and I still don't feel as if I have a chance against any perp who really wanted my info.

That said, seriously Experian????
 
2014-04-11 08:22:07 AM  
TheBigJerk:
For someone on the raggedy edge, that's crippling, for a 1%er that's a minor inconvenience.


It's not like you can't get a loan or something - it just adds more hoops to jump through, which I think should be he SOP anyway.
 
2014-04-11 08:23:03 AM  

Cold_Sassy: bunner: Cold_Sassy: loonatic112358: Maybe it's time for an actual national ID that's not your ss number and has some sort of chip and pin type method for access

Smart.  Very smart.

Yeah, that wont raise any fuss.

[1888.org image 400x254]

C'mon Bunner, It's like your ATM card.  Just put in a pin number.  If you mean getting a tattoo or RFID chip, then hell no.


RFID tattoos. Its the only way to be sure.
 
2014-04-11 08:23:09 AM  
200 million people signed up for that stupid service?
 
2014-04-11 08:27:24 AM  

Cold_Sassy: C'mon Bunner, It's like your ATM card.  Just put in a pin number.  If you mean getting a tattoo or RFID chip, then hell no.


I suppose most people would find that acceptable, but at the end of the day, it's just a lot of math with nothing much behind it.
 
2014-04-11 08:31:47 AM  

Prophet of Loss: Cold_Sassy: bunner: Cold_Sassy: loonatic112358: Maybe it's time for an actual national ID that's not your ss number and has some sort of chip and pin type method for access

Smart.  Very smart.

Yeah, that wont raise any fuss.

[1888.org image 400x254]

C'mon Bunner, It's like your ATM card.  Just put in a pin number.  If you mean getting a tattoo or RFID chip, then hell no.

RFID tattoos. Its the only way to be sure.


NEVER.
 
2014-04-11 08:34:03 AM  

bunner: Cold_Sassy: C'mon Bunner, It's like your ATM card.  Just put in a pin number.  If you mean getting a tattoo or RFID chip, then hell no.

I suppose most people would find that acceptable, but at the end of the day, it's just a lot of math with nothing much behind it.


Well sweetie, except that it would make it just a bit more difficult for someone to steal your most important piece of personal information.  Don't you agree?
 
2014-04-11 08:34:15 AM  

Ker_Thwap: 200 million people signed up for that stupid service?


Uh, no.  All of your information gets turned over to them by the people who give you credit.  Its the basis of how a credit reporting agency works.
 
2014-04-11 08:39:29 AM  

Cold_Sassy: DoBeDoBeDo: Cold_Sassy: All of these places that have online records of people's personal information need to step up their game.  I am sick of hearing about sh*t about this.  I personally don't conduct any type of personal business online that might  compromise my information, but I certainly feel sorry for people who do and who have their lives ruined by cyber-theft.

It doesn't matter if you do, it matters if the companies you deal with do. Unless you've never had a government ID, gotten a loan, or ever given that info to a 2nd party, your info is digitized somewhere and, most likely, vulnerable if not already stolen.

Well, thank whoever, I've not been victimized so far.  I have a lot of history, but I never do anything involving credit online and not one shred of personal information ever leaves my house intact.


That's not really what happened here - some dude basically got Experion to sell all that data directly to him.

When you check your annual free credit report see if Experion has a score for you. If they do then they almost certainly sold your SSN and other information to him. If you don't have a score with them then you're probably fine, you also presumably have never had a cell phone contract, cable, rented an apartment, had a credit card of any sort, applied for a student loan, financed a car or purschased a home.
 
2014-04-11 08:40:08 AM  

TheBigJerk: because 99% of the time it was someone else


And this is why I don't play the lottery...

I guess it's just the law of averages. There are far more poor/middle-class (ha!) than one-percenters, so it only makes sense if the thieves are just making a blind grab.

I was picturing it as more of a precision operation (too much Hollywood), but if they are just getting what they can and using the info before it gets noticed, then they can't necessarily filter it to find the bigger fishes.

Thanks for your assessment.
 
2014-04-11 08:43:27 AM  

loonatic112358: Maybe it's time for an actual national ID that's not your ss number and has some sort of chip and pin type method for access


The 'fundies would never go for that....that would be one step towards the "mark of the beast" in their eyes, IMHO...
 
2014-04-11 08:45:08 AM  
Well that sucks.
 
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