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(Daily Mail)   Just look at the mall rats scurrying around the decks of the deserted shopping malls of America   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 44
    More: Interesting, shopping centers  
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18341 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Apr 2014 at 10:36 PM (35 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2014-04-10 10:18:56 PM  
4 votes:

Mugato: The malls in Tampa and LA are always packed. Sucks to be Ohio I guess.


I don't know if the deserted malls are a sign of the decline of the economy as the article suggests, or merely evidence of how our country reacts to economic troubles.

In places where land is plentiful and cheap, neighborhoods and towns that fall on hard times often aren't given the opportunity to recover.  It's cheaper to build new subdivisions and commercial centers a few dozen miles down the road than try to rescue and rehabilitate struggling communities.

The stories of rough neighborhoods turning the corner and becoming thriving communities again mostly come from big cities where land is still at a premium and it's worth the effort to bring things back again.  Plus, cities tend to have more diverse economies, so they can weather the storm of recession whereas single-industry towns have nothing to fall back on when that industry goes tits up.
2014-04-10 11:02:41 PM  
3 votes:
I think it's a combination of things that have led to the decline of malls.

1. People shopping at Walmart instead of the big stores like Sears that were always half the square footage of malls.

2. Video arcades, and hanging out in general, no longer bringing in teenagers, who now play video games at home.

3. Everyone doing a lot of their shopping online now instead of at the mall.
2014-04-10 10:47:05 PM  
3 votes:
If you clean it up and keep quiet about it that would be a great place to skate in the winter.
2014-04-10 10:31:41 PM  
3 votes:
The new Oldsmobiles are in early this year...
2014-04-10 09:43:39 PM  
3 votes:
i.dailymail.co.uk

And there's the map of Australia.
2014-04-11 06:25:55 PM  
2 votes:
Forward-going, malls should be made of businesses that offer services. You can't mail a haircut, massage, nor daycare. One-stop-shopping would remain appealing.
2014-04-11 02:20:34 AM  
2 votes:

Harry_Seldon: The owner's should get a bunch of people in Hollywood grade Zombie costumes, and charge people to escape the Zombie apocalypse.


It's means "It is" or "it has".
Unless you mean to write "owners' property", or what have you... Otherwise, no comma necessary.

/grammar naziing
//language is my math
///SYNTAX ERROR!
2014-04-10 11:54:26 PM  
2 votes:
Woodfield mall is still going strong......


I have always thought about about converting a near-empty mall to senior and assisted living.  You'd convert many of the retail spaces into efficiency condos that were just a bedroom, living room, breakfast nook and bathroom. The apartments would be spartan because the idea was to spend non-sleeping time out circulating in the larger spaces. Some essential, niche retail and office spaces would be retained, to create the feeling of an old walkable neighborhood block, with a grocery/drugstore on the corner, etc. a clothing and shoe shop, book and music stores,  and a couple of places to gather to eat.  Much of the mall interior would be set up as pleasant green spaces, sculpture gardens, flower and veggie beds, pet enclosures, and places to walk around and get exercise without regard for real outdoor weather, and residents could be secure and have all the cultural and social amenities, plus a dedicated clinic for medical needs.
2014-04-10 11:50:00 PM  
2 votes:
Malls are what happen when a city lets its downtown decline. I'll take a vibrant downtown to a sprawl mall any day.
2014-04-10 11:17:09 PM  
2 votes:

f150: The new Oldsmobiles are in early this year...


This place has got everything!
2014-04-10 11:17:07 PM  
2 votes:
The owner's should get a bunch of people in Hollywood grade Zombie costumes, and charge people to escape the Zombie apocalypse.
2014-04-10 11:02:19 PM  
2 votes:
Malls are dead.  I'm so sick of my city trying to "reinvigorate" our mall.  I think they're spending $50 million on a 3rd attempt to resuscitate it.  I mean, I am spending $50 million for it.  Fark that.

The tax revenue from the mall has fallen every year since 2003 and that was only a small uptick in an otherwise consistent decline.  It will take at least 25 years to recover my tax dollars that are being funneled to a corrupt developer.

Even Radio Shack and Orange Julius have fled the mall.  The only reason I ever went anyway is for a gyro, but as promised that place closed too.  The owner told me he would close as soon as his lease was up on my penultimate visit to the mall.

I love the press it is getting though.  My local newspaper recently asked a bunch of people what stores they wanted to see there.  A bunch of retailers were mentioned and every single one of them that the local news asked said they have no plans to open anything there, but a few said "maybe".

Gone are the days when the mall attracted people from far and wide.

Note to self:  Don't vote for the real estate developer for city council.
2014-04-10 10:45:44 PM  
2 votes:
The Simpsons already did it.

And it's not all a sign of a collective decline. It's a sign that shopping moved away from these malls. Although if I were running a mall store I'd only be open evenings and weekends most of the year.

That might be a generalizable statement. A lot of stores are open all day while their customers are at work.
2014-04-10 09:48:09 PM  
2 votes:

Mugato: The malls in Tampa and LA are always packed. Sucks to be Ohio I guess.


Well it is Ohio.
2014-04-10 09:43:39 PM  
2 votes:
The malls in Tampa and LA are always packed. Sucks to be Ohio I guess.
2014-04-11 04:20:34 PM  
1 votes:
I remember when all the stories were about businesses abandoning downtown for these malls.
2014-04-11 03:56:38 PM  
1 votes:
By no means a sociologist or an economist (or a philanthropist, or a bicyclist), but yes, the mall seems to be an idea whose time has come and gone.

Malls boomed in the 60's through the 80's, particularly with kids in the 70's and 80's, when flight to the suburbs happened and kids lived too far apart to gather at a park or whatever, but had to rely on Mom and Dad to drop them off somewhere to gather and have fun. When you didn't have a car, or when gas was astronomical like it was in the late 70's, a place like a mall was awesome: You could shop, get food and hit the arcade or movie theater with your friends, all without having to leave the building, plus, Mom & Dad could even stay, too, just shopping at more Mom (JCPenney) and Dad (Sears Brand Central) kind of places.

The change that happened in the 80's/90's: Most suburban kids, 16+, started to get cars. With a car, kid can go do things without a parent, and you can hit better spots that have all of those specific things that you used to need to have in one place at the mall. Parents, without having to be attached to the kids, skip the mall. Then in the last decade, the PS3/Xbox takes care of the arcade/movie part, and the Internet suffices for shopping, so if you leave the house, you're probably just going to someone else's house.

Also, helicopter parents have gotten afraid of having their kids in any common area, out of their sight, where some predator could assault them, while kids also lead such scheduled, programmed lives between sports & music practices that do-nothing, hang-out time seems to be a rarity, usually spent with the nose in the cell phone or laptop chatting online. The occasional story of a mall riot, usually with racial overtones, probably hasn't helped this.

My girlfriend claims to have spent a ton of time in the mall growing up. She loves to shop. But now, she does it online, where she can find more unique niché things, get better deals and not have to deal with the riffraff. The mall is more of a nostalgia trip for her now than anything.

Given how easy it is to now work from home, the only places it seems like we might gather together en masse in the future might be schools & sports arenas, with schools potentially going the way of the Internet-killed Dodo at some point as well.
2014-04-11 03:43:12 PM  
1 votes:

Animatronik: gfid: Disciple_of_Trogdor: You know how I know you've NEVER been to Cleveland?

Because you think it snows too much.

I actually have been to Cleveland.  I left sunny Arizona to go there for a weekend of work.  I was at this job site for 24 hours - seriously, I worked 7 AM on a Saturday until about 7 AM on Sunday.  It snowed to whole time.  I even picked up a snow shovel, because living in Arizona I wondered what it was like to shovel snow.   It wasn't that fun, but fortunately a co-worker had a snow plow attached to the front of his pickup and he seemed to enjoy plowing the whole parking lot.

Yeah - it snowed way too much.  Maybe I just caught it on a bad weekend.

Seriously, who the fark outfits their pickup with a snow plow unless you live somewhere that gets too much snow?

I live in Colorado now.  I don't know anyone who has plow blades attached to the front of their cars and we get a fair amount of snow here.

So, I can sum up my trip to Cleveland like this.

/It snows so much that ordinary people attacjh snow plow blades to the front of their pickup trucks.
//It's so boring that people actually enjoy shoveling/plowing snow
///The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame sucks ass.
////you can't clean up some city grime - some shiat just doesn't wash off.  I saw that in Cleveland  (I've seen it other places too - they try to make the old part of the city new.....it doesn't work.  It's still a shiathioe)
//Don't take it personally if you're from Cleveland.  I'm not judging you personally.

I used to visit Phoenix a lot. I remember abandoned strip malls and a day where it was 115 degrees in the shade. I guess some people don't mind that.

Don't take it personally...


A lot of people dont realize this, but, the Lord GOD is actually pretty lazy. sure, he, the Lord GOD created the stars and the firmement, the dark and the light and all that crazy shiat in six days, but, then, he rested... basicaly, flaked off. well.. the earth wasn't done yet really, kinda like the terrain editor in Sim city... kinda only half baked really.

so.. here He, the Lord GOD had a bit of a mess on his hands.. here had places like Arizona, where it was hot, it was dry, and the ground was hard, then he had places like Ohio, were it was muddy, depressing, and the rivers caught on fire. Now, He, the Lord GOD couldn't really fix those problems so he was in a bit of a bind.
He, the Lord GOD pondered the situation and came up with the most practical, and perfect solution. He took the lands with all of the problems and he simply created People who like it like that.
2014-04-11 11:32:43 AM  
1 votes:
The only closed-in mall near us is the Northridge shopping center in Salinas,CA. It is extremely busy. 98.2% of the shoppers there are Hispanics, most of which don't know wtf Amazon is.
The general rule of thumb as is as follows:
1) round up as many children as you can
2) wear your finest cowboy/ranchero outfit
3) let the nine or more children you brought with you run amok, scream and be as disruptive as possible,
4) mean-mug the shiat out of every other person you see
5) don't buy anything
6) participate in the occasional gang related shooting

Maybe it's better that a lot of these enclosed malls are closing down.
2014-04-11 08:59:44 AM  
1 votes:

0z79: Yeah, Ohio can pretty much kiss my ass.


It's easy to hate on Ohio now, but the fact remains that Ohio was kicked extra special hard in the nutz by the de-industrialization of the USA.  Ohio was once a manufacturing powerhouse that provided millions good paying jobs.  When those jobs went overseas, there was nothing to replace them.   Other states lost as many, or more, factory jobs....New Jersey for example.  Unlike Ohio, New Jersey as fortunate enough to be stuck between Philly and New York City, when big finance took over in those cities, there was enough spillover into NJ to keep the place afloat until Depression 2.0.  Ohio, Michigan, and the other former Midwest manufacturing states are really the victims of policies set in Washington and Wall St., we really need to stop blaming the victims.
2014-04-11 08:35:09 AM  
1 votes:
Mall of America is an aweful mall to have to shop at because of the amusement park in the middle, all the stores ring it. Once you're above the first level you cant cut across the middle.

I like the new "town center" or fake downtown concept. In NoVA, there are still several busy indoor malls, but they started building town centers with normal mall stores and more upscale restaurants on the ground floor with offices above in the core and then ring it with parking garages and apartments/condos and townhomes. It works here because Fairfax county didnt plan growth, so its way more convenient than the real downtown Fairfax. The streets inside the town center can then be easily blocked for for festivals or fairs to further bring people to the area. Without really impacting people who just want to hit a store or eat.

There's a failed mall in Springfield that is on the same decline where the only thing still opened is a Sears and Macys. The car dealers in the area use the parking lot as a storage lot. It probably fell victim to the "those people" problem, but it is also basically equidistant from the upscale Tyson's Corner malls and Pentagon City, and a Mills brand indoor outlet mall, which probably split the shoppers off, plus Old Town Alexandria with its specialty shops and some chain stores.
2014-04-11 02:18:31 AM  
1 votes:
To make up for the Cleveland hate in this thread (not all undeserved, I grant) I'd like to point out Cleveland can be a great place to live near, if not in the city limits of.

Kick-ass libraries: I had no idea why so many libraries were listed as some of the best in the nation until I left NE Ohio and actually SAW the rest of the nation.  We have more library use (per capita, I think) than any other state in the union.  We take libraries seriously.

Add to that great metro parks, some of the best museums in the country (and I'm a museum snob - possibly because Ohio made me one), a fantastic collection of theaters, and some damn fine breweries.  (Don't just limit yourself to Great Lakes.  Willoughby Brewing Co has a peanut butter cup coffee porter that is slap someone in the face good).  (Seriously, in the face.)

The schools...  run the gamut.  There are some excellent ones, but it depends on where you live (though that's true most places, in my experience).

We even have jobs, we just don't have a lot of new jobs.  That's the real problem.  Progressive, the Evil Clinic, and the local universities can't hire everyone.  But if you lock into one of the good jobs and make sure your cheap house is insulated with liquid fire, if need be, to keep heating costs down you'll have a good quality of life to look forward to.

tl:dr:  If you're a cheap dork with a good job who doesn't mind cold weather, NE Ohio can be pretty great.  It's not for everybody, but there's good times to be had.
2014-04-10 11:47:44 PM  
1 votes:

Cheeseface: Yea I don't particularly understand this mindset that this is a sign of economic decline.

All the businesses moved to open air structures, or moved to more modern mall facilities.

Note how all of your Anytown, USA "pathetic abandoned malls" were all built 30-40 years ago without any renovation afterwards.


It's a shame, because the design and layout of the malls in TFA are pretty cool.  I especially like this interior:

i.dailymail.co.uk

And this entryway to what I assume was some sort of anchor store:

i.dailymail.co.uk

I mourn the loss of the 'massive slabs of imposing concrete' school of mall design.
2014-04-10 11:42:06 PM  
1 votes:

RatMotor: f150: The new Oldsmobiles are in early this year...

These places are just begging for an old '70s V8 RWD sedan and a GoPro camera

[i1.ytimg.com image 850x478]


Trivia Note: The mall they filmed that scene in (Dixie Square Mall) was already a defunct mall when they made this movie, in 1980. It only got demolished a couple of years ago after sitting as it was left long after the film crews had left and even the crackheads didn't bother to camp out inside anymore.

abnf.co

http://abnf.co/IL-dixie_square_mall.htm
2014-04-10 11:34:48 PM  
1 votes:

gfid: Walt_Jizzney: From TFA: 'There's nothing more profound and sobering then being inside an abandoned mall. It's a powerful symbol of America's economic decline,' This has little to do with any "economic decline" and more to do with the changing landscape of suburbia and of real estate trends in the retail sector, not to mention the impact of the Internet to "window shop" as it were. Malls have a shelf life. New malls replace them. Times change. It's life, nothing more. FFS the mall they were showing had a JcPenny's. Can you tell me what mall has been replaced with a new one in the last 10 years? Hint:  There has not been a new mall built in the US since 2005. You're right that it's more to do with "changing landscape of suburbia" than "economic decline", but nobody goes to the mall anymore and nobody wants to go to the mall.    People want to go to specific stores and they go to shopping centers with parking lots that allow them to park right in front of those stores rather than making them wander through a huge building full of stores. If I were to take a short trip to the mall probably less than 5 miles away from me, I would pass numerous stores on the way selling the exact same shiat as I could get in the mall.....actually, I would have a much bigger selection from the stores on the way to the mall than I would in the actual mall.


I assume you mean specifically an indoor mall.  Seems the trend now is the sprawling open air shopping area deal, but that's no different in essence than a mall.  A whole bunch of shopping in one place.

I buy 95% of what I need on Amazon! but even I occasionally have to venture to these places.  One upside is they actually have some good restaurants, and microbreweries.  Downside: no Sbarro.
2014-04-10 11:31:15 PM  
1 votes:

Walt_Jizzney: From TFA:

'There's nothing more profound and sobering then being inside an abandoned mall. It's a powerful symbol of America's economic decline,'


This has little to do with any "economic decline" and more to do with the changing landscape of suburbia and of real estate trends in the retail sector, not to mention the impact of the Internet to "window shop" as it were.

Malls have a shelf life. New malls replace them. Times change. It's life, nothing more.

FFS the mall they were showing had a JcPenny's.


Can you tell me what mall has been replaced with a new one in the last 10 years?

Hint:  There has not been a new mall built in the US since 2005.

You're right that it's more to do with "changing landscape of suburbia" than "economic decline", but nobody goes to the mall anymore and nobody wants to go to the mall.    People want to go to specific stores and they go to shopping centers with parking lots that allow them to park right in front of those stores rather than making them wander through a huge building full of stores.

If I were to take a short trip to the mall probably less than 5 miles away from me, I would pass numerous stores on the way selling the exact same shiat as I could get in the mall.....actually, I would have a much bigger selection from the stores on the way to the mall than I would in the actual mall.
2014-04-10 11:30:36 PM  
1 votes:
I was traveling for work about a month ago, and I was bored, so I went to the mall.

I spent the next hour walking around and thinking "I can't make this business model work". There's entirely too much overhead to realistically compete against Amazon.
2014-04-10 11:24:14 PM  
1 votes:

Walt_Jizzney: From TFA:

'There's nothing more profound and sobering then being inside an abandoned mall. It's a powerful symbol of America's economic decline,'


This has little to do with any "economic decline" and more to do with the changing landscape of suburbia and of real estate trends in the retail sector, not to mention the impact of the Internet to "window shop" as it were.

Malls have a shelf life. New malls replace them. Times change. It's life, nothing more.

FFS the mall they were showing had a JcPenny's.


With enough luck, an economic regrowth will coincide with an expanding population of retro-loving hipsters, and we'll see a return to downtown standalone multi-story department stores.  Malls are dying?  Good.
2014-04-10 11:23:44 PM  
1 votes:
December at the malls is a living Hell. Not necessarily because of all the shoppers but because in December these fly-by-night outfits open up a mini-kiosk in the middle of the aisles from November 15th-Jan. 2nd. From the dinky but overpriced Hickory Farms crap in a large box of Easter Grass to slice-your-eyballs-out RC Helicopters to PUSHY salespeople selling questionable cosmetics that lock onto you and won't leave you be even when you tell them a polite No Thank You.

I'd rather trudge out into a frozen parking lot having to go each time from individual store to store than endure the malls in December.
2014-04-10 11:17:20 PM  
1 votes:
Once again The Mail seems awfully concerned about what's going on all the way over in America.
2014-04-10 11:14:59 PM  
1 votes:

CruJones: There aren't less stores or less stuff being sold, it just isn't sold at these malls.  What kills a mall is typically a newer mall opening somewhere else.



Yeah,  it's either what you said, or a declining middle class in the middle of a decade long recession.
2014-04-10 11:12:44 PM  
1 votes:

Walt_Jizzney: From TFA:

'There's nothing more profound and sobering then being inside an abandoned mall. It's a powerful symbol of America's economic decline,'


This has little to do with any "economic decline" and more to do with the changing landscape of suburbia and of real estate trends in the retail sector, not to mention the impact of the Internet to "window shop" as it were.

Malls have a shelf life. New malls replace them. Times change. It's life, nothing more.

FFS the mall they were showing had a JcPenny's.



It's because those areas became very attractive and successful.  Same thing happened to Euclid Square mall and is now happening to Great Lakes mall in Mentor now.  It soon shall be closed.
2014-04-10 10:58:28 PM  
1 votes:

The Dogs of War: Intrepid00: The Dogs of War: Ah yes, Rolling Acres and Randall Mall. Two shining examples of why I want out of Ohio

So what is it about Ohio that makes people want out so bad they become astronauts?

lol, no idea. Something about this state just beats you down until you can't take it. Most of my friends have left the state. it's rather depressing. Both of these malls are within an hour of me.


I lasted 6 months in Cleveland and it got so depressing that I moved to Pittsburgh.

Let that sink in.
2014-04-10 10:58:07 PM  
1 votes:
media.tumblr.com
RIP Taquito.
2014-04-10 10:56:42 PM  
1 votes:
The Britons are just sad they didn't create Amazon and eBay.
2014-04-10 10:54:51 PM  
1 votes:
From TFA:

'There's nothing more profound and sobering then being inside an abandoned mall. It's a powerful symbol of America's economic decline,'


This has little to do with any "economic decline" and more to do with the changing landscape of suburbia and of real estate trends in the retail sector, not to mention the impact of the Internet to "window shop" as it were.

Malls have a shelf life. New malls replace them. Times change. It's life, nothing more.

FFS the mall they were showing had a JcPenny's.
2014-04-10 10:52:46 PM  
1 votes:

Intrepid00: The Dogs of War: Ah yes, Rolling Acres and Randall Mall. Two shining examples of why I want out of Ohio

So what is it about Ohio that makes people want out so bad they become astronauts?


lol, no idea. Something about this state just beats you down until you can't take it. Most of my friends have left the state. it's rather depressing. Both of these malls are within an hour of me.
2014-04-10 10:52:33 PM  
1 votes:
Yea I don't particularly understand this mindset that this is a sign of economic decline.

All the businesses moved to open air structures, or moved to more modern mall facilities.

Note how all of your Anytown, USA "pathetic abandoned malls" were all built 30-40 years ago without any renovation afterwards.
2014-04-10 10:51:10 PM  
1 votes:
www.kcet.orgI will miss Perry's Pizza the most.
2014-04-10 10:49:21 PM  
1 votes:
This is a mall with rats scurrying about Subby.
awscdn.streetauthority.net
2014-04-10 10:48:16 PM  
1 votes:
Randall Park was my mall growing up. Lots of memories there being with my family at Christmas, going on dates with my girlfriend in High School, dropping all my paper route money at the arcade, checking out all the cool HO gauge stuff at the hobby store that looked like a train car. Good Times. So sad that it's officially going away. Years ago I took a slow nostalgic trip through and pretty much knew it'd be the last time I'd be in there.
2014-04-10 10:44:44 PM  
1 votes:
Ah yes, Rolling Acres and Randall Mall. Two shining examples of why I want out of Ohio
2014-04-10 10:42:40 PM  
1 votes:
Our headquarters is an old shopping mall.  We have 1.2 million square feet and got it cheap.  It's pretty cool, there are escalators and it's obvious it used to be a mall.  I think the next phase to open will have the fountains and little rivers.  We recycled over 17,000 tons of metal, and all the glass storefronts are used for doors to meeting rooms, etc.  pretty good use for them, I think other companies are looking into it.
2014-04-10 10:19:01 PM  
1 votes:

Mugato: The malls in Tampa and LA are always packed. Sucks to be Ohio I guess.


Did you just brag about your favorite locality's malls being packed?

Thanks world, give me a moment while I chew this cyanide pill I have been saving just for an occasion such as this.
 
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