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(Daily Mail)   Just look at the mall rats scurrying around the decks of the deserted shopping malls of America   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 178
    More: Interesting, shopping centers  
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18342 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Apr 2014 at 10:36 PM (36 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-10 11:12:44 PM  

Walt_Jizzney: From TFA:

'There's nothing more profound and sobering then being inside an abandoned mall. It's a powerful symbol of America's economic decline,'


This has little to do with any "economic decline" and more to do with the changing landscape of suburbia and of real estate trends in the retail sector, not to mention the impact of the Internet to "window shop" as it were.

Malls have a shelf life. New malls replace them. Times change. It's life, nothing more.

FFS the mall they were showing had a JcPenny's.



It's because those areas became very attractive and successful.  Same thing happened to Euclid Square mall and is now happening to Great Lakes mall in Mentor now.  It soon shall be closed.
 
2014-04-10 11:14:04 PM  

Mugato: The malls in Tampa and LA are always packed. Sucks to be Ohio I guess.


Was going to say, the malls around me are all spending massively to expand A.F.A.P.
 
2014-04-10 11:14:59 PM  

CruJones: There aren't less stores or less stuff being sold, it just isn't sold at these malls.  What kills a mall is typically a newer mall opening somewhere else.



Yeah,  it's either what you said, or a declining middle class in the middle of a decade long recession.
 
2014-04-10 11:15:47 PM  
It's not the economy.

It's that Mall's were like mechanical bulls.
We're over it.
 
2014-04-10 11:16:16 PM  
While my local mall, despite being known for being a bit white trashy, is doing rather well, to the point of making strip malls in it's parking lots. Also I live in Minnesota so we got the Mall of America, and that just got a 325 million dollar budget to make larger, and is going to have a second hotel added to it. Pretty much it's working to be an 80's cyberpunk mall.
 
2014-04-10 11:17:07 PM  
The owner's should get a bunch of people in Hollywood grade Zombie costumes, and charge people to escape the Zombie apocalypse.
 
2014-04-10 11:17:09 PM  

f150: The new Oldsmobiles are in early this year...


This place has got everything!
 
2014-04-10 11:17:20 PM  
Once again The Mail seems awfully concerned about what's going on all the way over in America.
 
2014-04-10 11:17:28 PM  
gamerssphere.com
Just made me think of The Last of Us: Left Behind
 
2014-04-10 11:19:14 PM  
Wouldn't they make the best paintball arenas?
 
2014-04-10 11:23:34 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: Mugato: The malls in Tampa and LA are always packed. Sucks to be Ohio I guess.

I don't know if the deserted malls are a sign of the decline of the economy as the article suggests, or merely evidence of how our country reacts to economic troubles.

In places where land is plentiful and cheap, neighborhoods and towns that fall on hard times often aren't given the opportunity to recover.  It's cheaper to build new subdivisions and commercial centers a few dozen miles down the road than try to rescue and rehabilitate struggling communities.

The stories of rough neighborhoods turning the corner and becoming thriving communities again mostly come from big cities where land is still at a premium and it's worth the effort to bring things back again.  Plus, cities tend to have more diverse economies, so they can weather the storm of recession whereas single-industry towns have nothing to fall back on when that industry goes tits up.


Plus, malls like this have fallen out of favor in general. New malls are being built as several buildings in a large commercial development that also has office space and maybe some residential space.
 
2014-04-10 11:23:44 PM  
December at the malls is a living Hell. Not necessarily because of all the shoppers but because in December these fly-by-night outfits open up a mini-kiosk in the middle of the aisles from November 15th-Jan. 2nd. From the dinky but overpriced Hickory Farms crap in a large box of Easter Grass to slice-your-eyballs-out RC Helicopters to PUSHY salespeople selling questionable cosmetics that lock onto you and won't leave you be even when you tell them a polite No Thank You.

I'd rather trudge out into a frozen parking lot having to go each time from individual store to store than endure the malls in December.
 
2014-04-10 11:24:14 PM  

Walt_Jizzney: From TFA:

'There's nothing more profound and sobering then being inside an abandoned mall. It's a powerful symbol of America's economic decline,'


This has little to do with any "economic decline" and more to do with the changing landscape of suburbia and of real estate trends in the retail sector, not to mention the impact of the Internet to "window shop" as it were.

Malls have a shelf life. New malls replace them. Times change. It's life, nothing more.

FFS the mall they were showing had a JcPenny's.


With enough luck, an economic regrowth will coincide with an expanding population of retro-loving hipsters, and we'll see a return to downtown standalone multi-story department stores.  Malls are dying?  Good.
 
2014-04-10 11:30:00 PM  

Omahawg: the mall here died when all the stores bought their own land to build a 'lifestyle center' instead of leasing from general growth

it's like an empty tomb now

it was wall to wall commercialism and thronged with shoppers not even ten years ago.


Which one? Crossroads? General Growth really helped speed up their own demise when as each business' lease was up for renewal, they kept demanding a 5 year lease at increased rates. That's what chased out just about every business from the Mall of the Bluffs as their leases expired (that and the previously mentioned super-pushy sellers of dodgy cosmetics, who I think also had Xmas kiosks at Westroads and Oak View Mall as well). Even the usual cruddy Asian food spot in the food court decided to leave.

Metro Crossing FTW
 
2014-04-10 11:30:36 PM  
I was traveling for work about a month ago, and I was bored, so I went to the mall.

I spent the next hour walking around and thinking "I can't make this business model work". There's entirely too much overhead to realistically compete against Amazon.
 
2014-04-10 11:31:15 PM  

Walt_Jizzney: From TFA:

'There's nothing more profound and sobering then being inside an abandoned mall. It's a powerful symbol of America's economic decline,'


This has little to do with any "economic decline" and more to do with the changing landscape of suburbia and of real estate trends in the retail sector, not to mention the impact of the Internet to "window shop" as it were.

Malls have a shelf life. New malls replace them. Times change. It's life, nothing more.

FFS the mall they were showing had a JcPenny's.


Can you tell me what mall has been replaced with a new one in the last 10 years?

Hint:  There has not been a new mall built in the US since 2005.

You're right that it's more to do with "changing landscape of suburbia" than "economic decline", but nobody goes to the mall anymore and nobody wants to go to the mall.    People want to go to specific stores and they go to shopping centers with parking lots that allow them to park right in front of those stores rather than making them wander through a huge building full of stores.

If I were to take a short trip to the mall probably less than 5 miles away from me, I would pass numerous stores on the way selling the exact same shiat as I could get in the mall.....actually, I would have a much bigger selection from the stores on the way to the mall than I would in the actual mall.
 
2014-04-10 11:31:37 PM  

toadist: CruJones: There aren't less stores or less stuff being sold, it just isn't sold at these malls.  What kills a mall is typically a newer mall opening somewhere else.


Yeah,  it's either what you said, or a declining middle class in the middle of a decade long recession.


Even that declining middle class needs their iPhones and hats from Lids
 
2014-04-10 11:33:11 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: Mugato: The malls in Tampa and LA are always packed. Sucks to be Ohio I guess.

I don't know if the deserted malls are a sign of the decline of the economy as the article suggests, or merely evidence of how our country reacts to economic troubles.

In places where land is plentiful and cheap, neighborhoods and towns that fall on hard times often aren't given the opportunity to recover.  It's cheaper to build new subdivisions and commercial centers a few dozen miles down the road than try to rescue and rehabilitate struggling communities.

The stories of rough neighborhoods turning the corner and becoming thriving communities again mostly come from big cities where land is still at a premium and it's worth the effort to bring things back again.  Plus, cities tend to have more diverse economies, so they can weather the storm of recession whereas single-industry towns have nothing to fall back on when that industry goes tits up.


Many of the malls were built, not surprisingly, after banks loosened the qualifications for home loans back in the 80's. The malls expanded as home "owners" were given home equity loans for 125% of the value. As consumers flocked to malls with their equity money, they turned the malls into social centers. In turn, mall companies like General Growth raised the occupancy rates to the point only a few anchor stores were able to afford to be there, and even their profit margin was tight. 2001 saw increasing vacancy rates and when the 2007 housing bubble burst, General Growth filed bankruptcy. Why? People couldn't afford to go to the malls, the equity money was gone. GGC reorganized fairly quickly, while they were cash poor, their property investments were huge.

People still flock to malls, but they spend less - more within their means. The new malls are built cheap with many small cheap buildings compared to the huge massive buildings with high overhead, like from the 80's. "Factory Outlet" stores outproduce their full line store counterparts. People still spend money out of their disposable income, but don't consider home equity as disposable. You used to see big homes with new cars, campers, boats, motorcycles, etc, in the driveway - these were the man toys. What you didn't see was the $40k/yr spent by the wives on cloths and make-up, crap for the kids, furnishings - things that kept the mall's doors open.

I'm sure in some cases people are still paying off the purchases from the article's wore out malls in the form of mortgage payments. The economy only appears to look good. While consumers are spending, they really don't have enough to spend. We live in a champagne country with beer budgets. While the general population learned from the housing bubble, the government is still living off equity like it's still 1999.
 
2014-04-10 11:34:06 PM  

JerkStore: Mostly the area looks like downtown Beruit now.


I think they've managed to rebuild Beirut in the mean time.
souar.com
 
2014-04-10 11:34:22 PM  

f150: The new Oldsmobiles are in early this year...


These places are just begging for an old '70s V8 RWD sedan and a GoPro camera

i1.ytimg.com
 
2014-04-10 11:34:48 PM  

gfid: Walt_Jizzney: From TFA: 'There's nothing more profound and sobering then being inside an abandoned mall. It's a powerful symbol of America's economic decline,' This has little to do with any "economic decline" and more to do with the changing landscape of suburbia and of real estate trends in the retail sector, not to mention the impact of the Internet to "window shop" as it were. Malls have a shelf life. New malls replace them. Times change. It's life, nothing more. FFS the mall they were showing had a JcPenny's. Can you tell me what mall has been replaced with a new one in the last 10 years? Hint:  There has not been a new mall built in the US since 2005. You're right that it's more to do with "changing landscape of suburbia" than "economic decline", but nobody goes to the mall anymore and nobody wants to go to the mall.    People want to go to specific stores and they go to shopping centers with parking lots that allow them to park right in front of those stores rather than making them wander through a huge building full of stores. If I were to take a short trip to the mall probably less than 5 miles away from me, I would pass numerous stores on the way selling the exact same shiat as I could get in the mall.....actually, I would have a much bigger selection from the stores on the way to the mall than I would in the actual mall.


I assume you mean specifically an indoor mall.  Seems the trend now is the sprawling open air shopping area deal, but that's no different in essence than a mall.  A whole bunch of shopping in one place.

I buy 95% of what I need on Amazon! but even I occasionally have to venture to these places.  One upside is they actually have some good restaurants, and microbreweries.  Downside: no Sbarro.
 
2014-04-10 11:41:32 PM  
Where else am I supposed to go to oggle women's asses?
 
2014-04-10 11:42:06 PM  

RatMotor: f150: The new Oldsmobiles are in early this year...

These places are just begging for an old '70s V8 RWD sedan and a GoPro camera

[i1.ytimg.com image 850x478]


Trivia Note: The mall they filmed that scene in (Dixie Square Mall) was already a defunct mall when they made this movie, in 1980. It only got demolished a couple of years ago after sitting as it was left long after the film crews had left and even the crackheads didn't bother to camp out inside anymore.

abnf.co

http://abnf.co/IL-dixie_square_mall.htm
 
2014-04-10 11:42:49 PM  

gfid: Walt_Jizzney: From TFA:

'There's nothing more profound and sobering then being inside an abandoned mall. It's a powerful symbol of America's economic decline,'


This has little to do with any "economic decline" and more to do with the changing landscape of suburbia and of real estate trends in the retail sector, not to mention the impact of the Internet to "window shop" as it were.

Malls have a shelf life. New malls replace them. Times change. It's life, nothing more.

FFS the mall they were showing had a JcPenny's.

Can you tell me what mall has been replaced with a new one in the last 10 years?

Hint:  There has not been a new mall built in the US since 2005.

You're right that it's more to do with "changing landscape of suburbia" than "economic decline", but nobody goes to the mall anymore and nobody wants to go to the mall.    People want to go to specific stores and they go to shopping centers with parking lots that allow them to park right in front of those stores rather than making them wander through a huge building full of stores.

If I were to take a short trip to the mall probably less than 5 miles away from me, I would pass numerous stores on the way selling the exact same shiat as I could get in the mall.....actually, I would have a much bigger selection from the stores on the way to the mall than I would in the actual mall.


Yet even the first modern mall in the world is investing millions in itself
 
2014-04-10 11:42:53 PM  

thatboyoverthere: While my local mall, despite being known for being a bit white trashy, is doing rather well, to the point of making strip malls in it's parking lots. Also I live in Minnesota so we got the Mall of America, and that just got a 325 million dollar budget to make larger, and is going to have a second hotel added to it. Pretty much it's working to be an 80's cyberpunk mall.


Oh my, a 2nd hotel?

I'm pretty sure one of the biggest malls - probably the biggest - I've ever been in had 2 hotels back in the '80s.

I hope that $325 million is private funding..  If so, Mall of America seems to be doing it right.  I guess you have to build something massive to do it right.  FFS, Mall of America is actually a tourist attraction for some people.  I can't think of a single reason I would want to go there.

I guess it acts as a people-sink.  Sort of like a heat sink, it attracts and collects all the people together so that other areas are less crowded.
 
2014-04-10 11:43:03 PM  
My city has three malls. One that's been in decline as long as I can remember (It's the "Black people Mall"; all the good businesses engaged in White Flight). The other is smack-dab in the middle, and it's drying up to nothing but clothing outlets. The BIG mall in the downtown area is still going strong, but that's about it.
 
2014-04-10 11:43:08 PM  

gfid: Walt_Jizzney: From TFA:

'There's nothing more profound and sobering then being inside an abandoned mall. It's a powerful symbol of America's economic decline,'


This has little to do with any "economic decline" and more to do with the changing landscape of suburbia and of real estate trends in the retail sector, not to mention the impact of the Internet to "window shop" as it were.

Malls have a shelf life. New malls replace them. Times change. It's life, nothing more.

FFS the mall they were showing had a JcPenny's.

Can you tell me what mall has been replaced with a new one in the last 10 years?

Hint:  There has not been a new mall built in the US since 2005.

You're right that it's more to do with "changing landscape of suburbia" than "economic decline", but nobody goes to the mall anymore and nobody wants to go to the mall.    People want to go to specific stores and they go to shopping centers with parking lots that allow them to park right in front of those stores rather than making them wander through a huge building full of stores.

If I were to take a short trip to the mall probably less than 5 miles away from me, I would pass numerous stores on the way selling the exact same shiat as I could get in the mall.....actually, I would have a much bigger selection from the stores on the way to the mall than I would in the actual mall.


Massive, sprawling, 'outdoor malls' have become very popular, at least in my area of FL.  There are two near here that are always packed.  Personally, I prefer the old style enclosed ones.  You end up having to walk just as far to get to the store you want in the outdoor ones, but now you have to do it in the heat and/or rain instead of a nice air conditioned and climate controlled interior.

Another interesting trend is that they've been adding condo units above the stores as they've expanded, and pricey ones at that.  On one hand I guess it would be sort of cool to have access to everything as they're almost like mini-cities, but on the other hand, the constant traffic and crowds milling about would drive me nuts.
 
2014-04-10 11:47:44 PM  

Cheeseface: Yea I don't particularly understand this mindset that this is a sign of economic decline.

All the businesses moved to open air structures, or moved to more modern mall facilities.

Note how all of your Anytown, USA "pathetic abandoned malls" were all built 30-40 years ago without any renovation afterwards.


It's a shame, because the design and layout of the malls in TFA are pretty cool.  I especially like this interior:

i.dailymail.co.uk

And this entryway to what I assume was some sort of anchor store:

i.dailymail.co.uk

I mourn the loss of the 'massive slabs of imposing concrete' school of mall design.
 
2014-04-10 11:47:47 PM  
Ficoce:
As consumers Baby Boomer families flocked to malls with their equity money good incomes, largely from manufacturing careers (both blue and white collar), they turned the malls into social centers.

The success of the American Mall was phenomenon based largely upon demographics. Baby Boomers began to turn 20 in 1965. America was still the most prosperous nation by far. Young families flocked to the suburbs to buy cheap housing with their solid middle class incomes. Naturally they needed somewhere to spend their money.

Home equity lines of credit had almost nothing to do with it. People started getting scammed that way after they actually *had built some equity* into the late 80s and early 90s.
 
2014-04-10 11:48:07 PM  

gfid: Malls are dead.  I'm so sick of my city trying to "reinvigorate" our mall.  I think they're spending $50 million on a 3rd attempt to resuscitate it.  I mean, I am spending $50 million for it.  Fark that.

The tax revenue from the mall has fallen every year since 2003 and that was only a small uptick in an otherwise consistent decline.  It will take at least 25 years to recover my tax dollars that are being funneled to a corrupt developer.

Even Radio Shack and Orange Julius have fled the mall.  The only reason I ever went anyway is for a gyro, but as promised that place closed too.  The owner told me he would close as soon as his lease was up on my penultimate visit to the mall.

I love the press it is getting though.  My local newspaper recently asked a bunch of people what stores they wanted to see there.  A bunch of retailers were mentioned and every single one of them that the local news asked said they have no plans to open anything there, but a few said "maybe".

Gone are the days when the mall attracted people from far and wide.

Note to self:  Don't vote for the real estate developer for city council.


Yeah... that's the reality.  Malls as we knew them as kids (no idea how old you are, but I assume close enough of an age to me) are in the past.

I kinda miss it, but I assume that's like people of my father's age missing the big barrel of pickles at the corner marker.  Ain't there no more.
 
2014-04-10 11:48:15 PM  
TV's Vinnie:

Once again The Mail seems awfully concerned about what's going on all the way over in America.


Gotta love "The Fail".  Steady reporting of American news of the most lurid murders, assaults on white folks, anything to do with Detroit and mall closures in the US, to make suburban Britons quake in fear while having their afternoon tea and munching on digestives, thanking god they weren't born in America.


ftfa: "When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S."

Yeah, "boom years", because since the 70's, nothing ever happened in the US since then and it's just been one steady economic decline.
 
2014-04-10 11:50:00 PM  
Malls are what happen when a city lets its downtown decline. I'll take a vibrant downtown to a sprawl mall any day.
 
2014-04-10 11:51:30 PM  
I went to the Mall of America today, so I am getting a kick out of these replies...
 
2014-04-10 11:54:26 PM  
Woodfield mall is still going strong......


I have always thought about about converting a near-empty mall to senior and assisted living.  You'd convert many of the retail spaces into efficiency condos that were just a bedroom, living room, breakfast nook and bathroom. The apartments would be spartan because the idea was to spend non-sleeping time out circulating in the larger spaces. Some essential, niche retail and office spaces would be retained, to create the feeling of an old walkable neighborhood block, with a grocery/drugstore on the corner, etc. a clothing and shoe shop, book and music stores,  and a couple of places to gather to eat.  Much of the mall interior would be set up as pleasant green spaces, sculpture gardens, flower and veggie beds, pet enclosures, and places to walk around and get exercise without regard for real outdoor weather, and residents could be secure and have all the cultural and social amenities, plus a dedicated clinic for medical needs.
 
2014-04-11 12:01:19 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: Massive, sprawling, 'outdoor malls' have become very popular, at least in my area of FL.  There are two near here that are always packed.  Personally, I prefer the old style enclosed ones.  You end up having to walk just as far to get to the store you want in the outdoor ones, but now you have to do it in the heat and/or rain instead of a nice air conditioned and climate controlled interior.

Another interesting trend is that they've been adding condo units above the stores as they've expanded, and pricey ones at that.  On one hand I guess it would be sort of cool to have access to everything as they're almost like mini-cities, but on the other hand, the constant traffic and crowds milling about would drive me nuts.


Okay, to clarify when I used the term "mall", I meant the enclosed type.  The sprawling strip malls are still being built and are massively popular.

Anytime I need to go to a store, I park right in front of it, often closer to the door than I would if I parked at a mall.  The only thing that kind of sucks about it is I park and drive to every store I go to, whereas in a mall, I would hit several stores and just carry my merchandise around with me until I was done.

That's not a big deal anymore, especially when there are big stores like Walmart, Target, Sam's Club that sell all sorts of stuff and you don't need to hit several stores to get what you need.

I think I would loathe having a condo on top of a mall.  I could see having one on top of a grocery store, especially if it were open 24 hours.  Actually, I think that would be awesome especially if there were a liquor store too.  (Grocery stores can't sell alcohol here 3.2% beer doesn't count as alcohol, IMO)

Sometimes, the grocery store seems so far away even though it really isn't, but if I could just take an elevator at 3AM when I realize I'm out of some particular food?  Yeah, I'll buy that condo.
 
2014-04-11 12:03:53 AM  
Whee! looks like everybody's got TF for the day.
 
2014-04-11 12:04:53 AM  

Intrepid00: The Dogs of War: Ah yes, Rolling Acres and Randall Mall. Two shining examples of why I want out of Ohio

So what is it about Ohio that makes people want out so bad they become astronauts?


What pass for cities in northeast Ohio (Cleveland, Akron, Youngstown) are a bit like Detroit, with nowhere to go but down and no reason for anybody with any ambition in life to stick around. Detroiters can at least emigrate by television, courtesy of CBC Windsor.
 
2014-04-11 12:05:26 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: I mourn the loss of the 'massive slabs of imposing concrete' school of mall design.


Feels familiar:

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-04-11 12:05:29 AM  
If it were just a matter of the economy I'd get it.  But I live in the north where it's shiatty 8 months out of the year.  The indoor malls decline while a new mall pops up that is somehow different because it's outdoors and has a shiattier food court.  Removing the roof apparently changes everything.  But I gotta freeze my ass off and/or be douched with rain and/or snow while I shop...at the same group of stores.
 
2014-04-11 12:09:27 AM  

2chris2: I think it's a combination of things that have led to the decline of malls.

1. People shopping at Walmart instead of the big stores like Sears that were always half the square footage of malls.

2. Video arcades, and hanging out in general, no longer bringing in teenagers, who now play video games at home.

3. Everyone doing a lot of their shopping online now instead of at the mall.


nailed it.
 
2014-04-11 12:13:20 AM  

Any Pie Left: Woodfield mall is still going strong......


I have always thought about about converting a near-empty mall to senior and assisted living.  You'd convert many of the retail spaces into efficiency condos that were just a bedroom, living room, breakfast nook and bathroom. The apartments would be spartan because the idea was to spend non-sleeping time out circulating in the larger spaces. Some essential, niche retail and office spaces would be retained, to create the feeling of an old walkable neighborhood block, with a grocery/drugstore on the corner, etc. a clothing and shoe shop, book and music stores,  and a couple of places to gather to eat.  Much of the mall interior would be set up as pleasant green spaces, sculpture gardens, flower and veggie beds, pet enclosures, and places to walk around and get exercise without regard for real outdoor weather, and residents could be secure and have all the cultural and social amenities, plus a dedicated clinic for medical needs.


That actually sounds like a great idea.  Do old people still go to the mall to walk?  I remember when that was a thing.  I also remember a few places where my grandparents and great grandparents spent their last years.  The best of them was sort of like a nice, but not luxurious hotel, but there was nothing to do other than socialize with other old people.
 
2014-04-11 12:16:21 AM  

germ78: Whee! looks like everybody's got TF for the day.


OMG, we did.  I hadn't even noticed yet.

Thanks, Fark
 
2014-04-11 12:17:04 AM  
What purpose to malls really serve anymore? I haven't been to one in 5 or 6 years...I was in college at the time and had no other means of transportation besides the bus that went to the mall (where I bought a MiniDV tape from Sears for some stupid project). Maybe if you are a female, there is more of an appeal, but as a pretty low-key guy that buys my clothes from Goodwill, Ross, Kohl's or Costco, just why would I spend 20 minutes to drive to a mall? As a country, we are way over retailed. The outdoor center trend isn't working either. They built one in the down next to mine back in 2006. The only thing that is ever busy is Wegmans and a few of the other big boxes. The fake 'main street' area has had so many stores come and go, and has never been fully filled, nor developed as it was supposed to be. (But as this sits, about 1/2 a mile up the road, they cleared the last develop-able space in the town for more cardboard housing and a Super Walmart and a bunch of other space that will probably just sit vacant....just what we need, NOT.
 
2014-04-11 12:19:11 AM  
These pictures remind me that I never finished Silent Hill 3
 
2014-04-11 12:20:48 AM  
Test test... anyone heeeere? Heloooo...yup, some day this will all be
Trees again.
 
2014-04-11 12:26:50 AM  

2chris2: I think it's a combination of things that have led to the decline of malls.

1. People shopping at Walmart instead of the big stores like Sears that were always half the square footage of malls.

2. Video arcades, and hanging out in general, no longer bringing in teenagers, who now play video games at home.

3. Everyone doing a lot of their shopping online now instead of at the mall.


Actually, it's 3, 1, then 2 for leading causes.

internet shopping destroying brick and mortar stores, Walmart has ALOT in it, and arcades never drew big shipping crowds, just us nerds who wanted to play the latest quarter eating game.
 
2014-04-11 12:36:29 AM  

CruJones: Our headquarters is an old shopping mall.  We have 1.2 million square feet and got it cheap.  It's pretty cool, there are escalators and it's obvious it used to be a mall.  I think the next phase to open will have the fountains and little rivers.  We recycled over 17,000 tons of metal, and all the glass storefronts are used for doors to meeting rooms, etc.  pretty good use for them, I think other companies are looking into it.


I've seen shopping and strip malls turned into data centers.  Very strange seeing basically empty parking lots with very clean and up to date exteriors.  You walk in and its just cages.
 
2014-04-11 12:40:41 AM  
Some that are REALLY scary are the semi-open ones.

Down & out punks hang there...and they don't care who they go after.


There is no mall security anymore...and there are tons of corners and nooks for them to take advantage of.
 
2014-04-11 12:45:31 AM  
The mausoleums of capitalism, watch how they crumble.
 
2014-04-11 12:49:32 AM  
Testing
 
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