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(Washington Post)   Sparkling wine? More like sparkling WIN   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 12
    More: Interesting, nutritional information  
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3641 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Apr 2014 at 7:53 PM (19 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-10 06:34:29 PM
25.media.tumblr.com
I'll have a white wine spritzer!
 
2014-04-10 07:05:54 PM
The Wonkblog guide to efficient drinking

c2.staticflickr.com
 
2014-04-10 07:59:33 PM
But of course, nobody goes around drinking alcohol by the ounce.

No, but I did pour out 4 ounces in a measuring cup then poured it into my standard wine glasses.  A proper portion hits just at the saddle point.
 
2014-04-10 08:05:06 PM

bdub77: The Wonkblog guide to efficient drinking


Wonkblog and I have very different definitions of "efficient".
 
2014-04-10 08:07:13 PM
Another plus is that the carbonation helps push the consumed beverage from the stomach into the small intestine where alcohol is absorbed faster.

I wonder how well hard liquor would hold carbonation...
 
2014-04-10 08:14:32 PM

Munchkin City Coroner: Another plus is that the carbonation helps push the consumed beverage from the stomach into the small intestine where alcohol is absorbed faster.

I wonder how well hard liquor would hold carbonation...


Like, say, vodka tonic?
 
2014-04-10 08:19:12 PM

GRCooper: Munchkin City Coroner: Another plus is that the carbonation helps push the consumed beverage from the stomach into the small intestine where alcohol is absorbed faster.

I wonder how well hard liquor would hold carbonation...

Like, say, vodka tonic?


Diluting it defeats the purpose.
 
2014-04-10 10:03:36 PM

Munchkin City Coroner: GRCooper: Munchkin City Coroner: Another plus is that the carbonation helps push the consumed beverage from the stomach into the small intestine where alcohol is absorbed faster.

I wonder how well hard liquor would hold carbonation...

Like, say, vodka tonic?

Diluting it defeats the purpose.


So, you're saying that instead of 1 oz of vodka and 7 oz of tonic water, you want your drink to be 8 oz of cabonated vodka?

Have you considered running for president in 2016? You'd have my vote
 
2014-04-11 05:18:14 AM

Munchkin City Coroner: Another plus is that the carbonation helps push the consumed beverage from the stomach into the small intestine where alcohol is absorbed faster.

I wonder how well hard liquor would hold carbonation...


m.sodastreamusa.com + static.squarespace.com
Surely somebody has tried it?
 
2014-04-11 09:16:56 AM

casual disregard: Munchkin City Coroner: Another plus is that the carbonation helps push the consumed beverage from the stomach into the small intestine where alcohol is absorbed faster.

I wonder how well hard liquor would hold carbonation...

Surely somebody has tried it?


someone has, and don't call me Shirley
 
2014-04-11 09:36:27 AM
what the hell is an ounce? oh, one 16ths of a pound.    now, how many pounds of wine are in a typical glass?  and while you're at it, explain to me again how avoirdupois is more intuitive than metric?
 
2014-04-11 10:46:05 PM

Bomb Head Mohammed: what the hell is an ounce? oh, one 16ths of a pound.    now, how many pounds of wine are in a typical glass?  and while you're at it, explain to me again how avoirdupois is more intuitive than metric?


We're talking about liquid, so no, "one ounce" is actually "one fluid ounce", a measure of volume rather than weight. (yes, this is one of THE stupidest parts of the system). Technically a fluid ounce should be written "fl oz", but the "fluid"/"fl" is often left off when it's obvious from context. Note that the US system is not QUITE the same as the avoirdupois - the fl oz is actually 1/128 gallon, in order to make it *slightly* less incoherent.

1 fl oz ~= 30 mL. This is "one drink", in theory, of hard liquor, except a shot of hard liquor is usually actually *1.5 fl oz* in the US. Your mileage may vary in other countries, or by bartender. So 2 shots/mixed drinks is usually actually 3 drinks, because people are dumb.

A glass of wine is 4-5oz, so 120-150 mL (about one-eighth L). This is "one drink" for wine.

8oz = 1 cup ~250 mL. This is the size of that little milk carton they give you in elementary school. When they say you should drink 8 glasses of water a day, they actually mean this size, though many of us have much bigger glasses at home.

A typical can of beer or soda is 12oz, so ~350 mL. And this is the "one drink" standard for beer, though they're talking about typical beer, not the 9%+ ABV ones.

16 fl oz = 1 pint ~= .5 liter. A pint is standard for beer on tap (again with the "one drink" being NOT this size), and I believe they sell soda in .5L bottles in metric countries.

20 fl oz is typical for a small plastic bottle of soda in the US.

750mL (five or six glasses) is typical for a bottle of wine.

32 fl oz = 1 quart ~=1 L. Smaller bottles of milk or orange juice are often this size.

Large soda bottles are 2L (yes, weirdly, for *these alone*, we've switched to L for) ~= 64 fl oz = 1 half-gallon. Larger bottles of milk or orange juice are usually in half-gallons.

128 fl oz = 1 gallon ~ 4L. Which is how we buy our gas. Right now it's somewhere around $3.75/gallon here in CT, for the standard grade stuff. So you Europeans get some idea just how expensive your gas is by comparison!

When we talk about barrels of oil, we apparently mean 42 (US) gallons ~= 168L  - I had to look this one up, but it seemed relevant. Barrels of other stuff, like beer or whiskey, vary, for historical reasons, i.e. people made actual barrels by hand.
 
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