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(Fox News)   ER doctors often miss the early signs of stroke. Probably because after four hours in the waiting room all the early signs have been replaced by paralysis and coma   (foxnews.com) divider line 19
    More: Scary, er doctor, MedPage Today, strokes  
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559 clicks; posted to Geek » on 10 Apr 2014 at 9:50 AM (33 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



19 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-04-10 09:51:36 AM  
Wait wait wait - Fox news is criticizing American health care??? Not a "soshulist" country? Is this Bizzaro world?
 
2014-04-10 09:56:14 AM  
I thought the US had the best health care system in the world?
 
2014-04-10 10:08:41 AM  

gopher321: Wait wait wait - Fox news is criticizing American health care??? Not a "soshulist" country? Is this Bizzaro world?


Haven't you heard? The Affordable Care Act made America a fascist socialist third-world a country..

/Thanks Obama!
 
2014-04-10 10:23:06 AM  
In other news many diagnoses are not absolute and symptoms are not always definitive.
 
2014-04-10 10:25:41 AM  
CSB: Last time I went to the ER, I said I thought I was having a stroke.  I was having episodes of dizziness and powerful feelings of deja vu, weird weird images racing through my mind.  Each episode was followed by a panic attack.  I jumped immediately to the front of the triage, they admitted me to the hospital, and I was in the MRI within an hour of my arrival.  As it turned out, I had a simple partial seizure.  But the hospital was all over that shiat.

But, there was on ER nurse who got very, VERY angry that I was admitted.  She was arguing/yelling at the ER doc and the triage nurse that it was "bullshiat" that I had jumped the line and that in her "expert" opinion, there was nothing wrong with me. She refused to work on me. So, yeah, I can still believe that story.

/Contacted the patient advocate when I was discharged.
// Threatened to file a HIPPA violation, since nurse was using PHI when she was going monkey bananas on her colleagues.
 
2014-04-10 10:27:53 AM  

Smoky Dragon Dish: CSB: Last time I went to the ER, I said I thought I was having a stroke.  I was having episodes of dizziness and powerful feelings of deja vu, weird weird images racing through my mind.  Each episode was followed by a panic attack.  I jumped immediately to the front of the triage, they admitted me to the hospital, and I was in the MRI within an hour of my arrival.  As it turned out, I had a simple partial seizure.  But the hospital was all over that shiat.

But, there was on ER nurse who got very, VERY angry that I was admitted.  She was arguing/yelling at the ER doc and the triage nurse that it was "bullshiat" that I had jumped the line and that in her "expert" opinion, there was nothing wrong with me. She refused to work on me. So, yeah, I can still believe that story.

/Contacted the patient advocate when I was discharged.
// Threatened to file a HIPPA violation, since nurse was using PHI when she was going monkey bananas on her colleagues.



Man, sorry dude(ette).  That was just a shiatty nurse.

Even in a perfect world things will be missed though.
 
2014-04-10 10:28:29 AM  
4 hours? That's a breeze for the hospital. 4 hours is a walk-in clinic. Double that wait for ER.

/Canada
 
2014-04-10 10:31:24 AM  
Guessing no.1 is doge-speak.
 
2014-04-10 10:34:15 AM  

BafflerMeal: Smoky Dragon Dish: CSB: Last time I went to the ER, I said I thought I was having a stroke.  I was having episodes of dizziness and powerful feelings of deja vu, weird weird images racing through my mind.  Each episode was followed by a panic attack.  I jumped immediately to the front of the triage, they admitted me to the hospital, and I was in the MRI within an hour of my arrival.  As it turned out, I had a simple partial seizure.  But the hospital was all over that shiat.

But, there was on ER nurse who got very, VERY angry that I was admitted.  She was arguing/yelling at the ER doc and the triage nurse that it was "bullshiat" that I had jumped the line and that in her "expert" opinion, there was nothing wrong with me. She refused to work on me. So, yeah, I can still believe that story.

/Contacted the patient advocate when I was discharged.
// Threatened to file a HIPPA violation, since nurse was using PHI when she was going monkey bananas on her colleagues.


Man, sorry dude(ette).  That was just a shiatty nurse.

Even in a perfect world things will be missed though.


She was a twunt.  Very young, didn't look a day over 23.  Everybody else was very, very nice though.  I could tell everybody there was also worried, and that sort of made it worse.  I never had a seizure happen to me before, so I was scared shiatless when it happened.

/Dude
//39 when it happened to me.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-04-10 10:54:31 AM  
I read about miracle treatments. Spinal injury + some drug within a couple hours = no paralysis. Stroke + some drug within a couple hours = working brain. And then I think about the chance that I will be presented to medical professionals who know about the treatment, make the right diagnosis, and have the drugs on hand, all within a couple hours, and I resign myself to just dying or vegetating in the traditional manner when something awful happens to me.

I know best case is I fall down in front of an ambulance with a crew that just had the "falling down on sidewalk means ..." training and they take me to the only ER in the Boston area that specializes in falling down on sidewalk syndrome. I just don't expect that to happen. I don't even know if it's legal for an ambulance crew to rush to assistance without a call in the system. I read too many stories about ER doctors who can't attent a patient right outside the hospital door because that's not the way things are done.
 
2014-04-10 11:09:29 AM  

Smoky Dragon Dish: BafflerMeal: Smoky Dragon Dish: CSB: Last time I went to the ER, I said I thought I was having a stroke.  I was having episodes of dizziness and powerful feelings of deja vu, weird weird images racing through my mind.  Each episode was followed by a panic attack.  I jumped immediately to the front of the triage, they admitted me to the hospital, and I was in the MRI within an hour of my arrival.  As it turned out, I had a simple partial seizure.  But the hospital was all over that shiat.

But, there was on ER nurse who got very, VERY angry that I was admitted.  She was arguing/yelling at the ER doc and the triage nurse that it was "bullshiat" that I had jumped the line and that in her "expert" opinion, there was nothing wrong with me. She refused to work on me. So, yeah, I can still believe that story.

/Contacted the patient advocate when I was discharged.
// Threatened to file a HIPPA violation, since nurse was using PHI when she was going monkey bananas on her colleagues.


Man, sorry dude(ette).  That was just a shiatty nurse.

Even in a perfect world things will be missed though.

She was a twunt.  Very young, didn't look a day over 23.  Everybody else was very, very nice though.  I could tell everybody there was also worried, and that sort of made it worse.  I never had a seizure happen to me before, so I was scared shiatless when it happened.

/Dude
//39 when it happened to me.


I teach people (mostly CNA/LPN) that want to become RN's and based on what I've seen in class, I've concluded that there are two groups of nurses I would never want treating me.

The first would be the old nurse that thinks they know everything but really know absolutely nothing but have "seen it all". They don't really occur too frequently among the older nurses, but the few that exist are the worst.

The second would be the ultra young early 20's nurses who would have been in a sorority at a 4 year institution if they could go to college. Nothing but drama and biatchiness with a dash of complete lack of intellect.  I don't know what makes them behave the way they do but they seem to consist of gossip, dunning-kruger, and an disproportionately inflated self esteem.  These tend to cluster in groups of like minded individuals which amplifies their behavior.

/have a list of students that I would never want treatment from
//luckily, most of them can't make it all the way through the program
 
2014-04-10 11:44:08 AM  
zelachang:

I teach people (mostly CNA/LPN) that want to become RN's and based on what I've seen in class, I've concluded that there are two groups of nurses I would never want treating me.

The first would be the old nurse that thinks they know everything but really know absolutely nothing but have "seen it all". They don't really occur too frequently among the older nurses, but the few that exist are the worst.

The second would be the ultra young early 20's nurses who would have been in a sorority at a 4 year institution if they could go to college. Nothing but drama and bia ...


I left out part of the story, since it was irrelevant to the stroke part.  I also have a mild case of NF1.  So, I have bumps on my torso.  She had asked me to take off my shirt so she could start an EKG.  She saw the bumps, took a step back, disgusted, and said "Tell me what I am looking at here. I need to know what I am dealing with."  I told her I had NF1, and that is when she left (didn't want to touch me) and she started arguing with her colleagues.

Do they teach compassion and empathy in nursing school? Trust me, I didn't want to be born with NF1, nor did I want to find out that I have mild Epilepsy.  And it wasn't because of me that the stars aligened to put her in the same room as me that day.
 
2014-04-10 11:49:17 AM  

Smoky Dragon Dish: zelachang:

I teach people (mostly CNA/LPN) that want to become RN's and based on what I've seen in class, I've concluded that there are two groups of nurses I would never want treating me.

The first would be the old nurse that thinks they know everything but really know absolutely nothing but have "seen it all". They don't really occur too frequently among the older nurses, but the few that exist are the worst.

The second would be the ultra young early 20's nurses who would have been in a sorority at a 4 year institution if they could go to college. Nothing but drama and bia ...

I left out part of the story, since it was irrelevant to the stroke part.  I also have a mild case of NF1.  So, I have bumps on my torso.  She had asked me to take off my shirt so she could start an EKG.  She saw the bumps, took a step back, disgusted, and said "Tell me what I am looking at here. I need to know what I am dealing with."  I told her I had NF1, and that is when she left (didn't want to touch me) and she started arguing with her colleagues.

Do they teach compassion and empathy in nursing school? Trust me, I didn't want to be born with NF1, nor did I want to find out that I have mild Epilepsy.  And it wasn't because of me that the stars aligened to put her in the same room as me that day.



Sorry, man.  If I was working with her, she'd get thrown out of the room.  Completely and utterly unprofessional and shiatty.
 
2014-04-10 12:22:07 PM  
Ask me anything about stroke from a patient's perspective.  5 weeks ago today I was circling the drain in the ICU.

Mine was a TIA (Transient Ischemic Attack).  They only call it "Stroke" when there's permanent damage, technically.  That said, the symptoms and medical response is the same.  After reading the article, it occurs to me how fortunate I am that one of the paramedics who responded during the first attack had been through this in 2011 himself and knew exactly what it was.

If you check into the ER and tell them you're having stroke symptoms, you're in immediately.  The bad news is, the symptoms can be all over the place.  Like Smokey Dragon Dish, the initial onset was a surrealistic, disoriented feeling.  It was weird, but I wasn't thinking stroke.  At that point, I did not notice any right side weakness.  It may have been there, but if you're not specifically looking for it, you probably won't notice it yourself.

It can happen to anyone - I'm 45 but have been a regular competitive runner all my life.  Mine was caused by a tear in the carotid artery wall (called a dissection) that filled with blood and pinched off flow to the left side of my brain.

It's easy to miss the symptoms.  The biggest "tell" was when a particularly astute doctor began pricking me with a sharp on various body parts.  I could not feel the prick on my right arm, only the pressure.  Felt like he was using a Q-tip.  I'd previously passed all the other standard neuro tests.
 
2014-04-10 12:31:14 PM  
What's really needed in an ER is a sort of diagnostic manual that patients can consult themselves. Set it up as a series of electronic kiosks complete with blood pressure monitors, HR monitors, disposable tongue-depressors, mallets for the reflex test, thermometer, x-ray camera, two sensors that feel your glands, a really bright light to shine in the eyes... After researching their symptoms thru the kiosk's database of diseases and arriving at a self-diagnosis, they can type in the condition and receive a therapy recommendation along with any prescription that might be called for. That'll cut down the lines quick.
 
2014-04-10 12:44:23 PM  

Smoky Dragon Dish: zelachang:

I teach people (mostly CNA/LPN) that want to become RN's and based on what I've seen in class, I've concluded that there are two groups of nurses I would never want treating me.

The first would be the old nurse that thinks they know everything but really know absolutely nothing but have "seen it all". They don't really occur too frequently among the older nurses, but the few that exist are the worst.

The second would be the ultra young early 20's nurses who would have been in a sorority at a 4 year institution if they could go to college. Nothing but drama and bia ...

I left out part of the story, since it was irrelevant to the stroke part.  I also have a mild case of NF1.  So, I have bumps on my torso.  She had asked me to take off my shirt so she could start an EKG.  She saw the bumps, took a step back, disgusted, and said "Tell me what I am looking at here. I need to know what I am dealing with."  I told her I had NF1, and that is when she left (didn't want to touch me) and she started arguing with her colleagues.

Do they teach compassion and empathy in nursing school? Trust me, I didn't want to be born with NF1, nor did I want to find out that I have mild Epilepsy.  And it wasn't because of me that the stars aligened to put her in the same room as me that day.


I teach the basic sciences side (anatomy and physiology) so don't know too much about what happens later.  I would imagine they get some training in bedside manner and stuff like MD's do but dicks gonna be dicks (or coonts will be coonts I guess).  Can't teach basic courtesy.
 
2014-04-10 01:20:59 PM  
Every doctor and nurse in the emergency room I practice in is NIHSS (National Institute of Health Stroke Scale) certified. Accurately diagnosing a stroke isn't that difficult; if a patient earns points on the scale that differ from their baseline, they're a stroke until proven otherwise.

Ain't too difficult.
 
2014-04-10 05:20:25 PM  
Seriously, if you think you are having a stroke call an ambulance. If EMS evaluates you and think you meet criteria, you usually fast tracked to a CT Scanner and Thrombolytics are waiting to be mixed. This can minimize damage. @ things you need an ambulance for are Chest Pain and Strokelike symptoms. Period.
 
2014-04-11 09:32:50 PM  

globalwarmingpraiser: Seriously, if you think you are having a stroke call an ambulance. If EMS evaluates you and think you meet criteria, you usually fast tracked to a CT Scanner and Thrombolytics are waiting to be mixed. This can minimize damage. @ things you need an ambulance for are Chest Pain and Strokelike symptoms. Period.


Solid advice in general, but if I called 911 every time I thought I MIGHT be having a heart attack or stroke, I'd be calling a few times a week. I have not had brain imaging but did some tests with a cardiologist, who said I'm fine. I think I'm just prone to anxiety and hypochondria. I've never experienced debilitating symptoms--just some mild discomfort--so unless it's possible to have dozens of very tiny strokes and/or heart attacks with full recovery then it's probably psychological, with some heartburn thrown in there.
 
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