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(WISHTV)   If you're feeling chilly, do you a) turn on the space heater, b) go get a pizza, or c) fall asleep in your car while your house is burning down because you left to get a pizza without turning off the space heater?   (wishtv.com) divider line 26
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1462 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Apr 2014 at 5:51 PM (23 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



26 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-04-09 04:21:50 PM
What I want to know is, what type of "space heaters" do these people have that keep burning down their houses?  Provided you don't coat them in oil rags, all the electric space heaters I've ever used never had the "burn down the house" feature equipped.
 
2014-04-09 05:19:40 PM
i3.ytimg.com
 
2014-04-09 05:39:45 PM

Geotpf: What I want to know is, what type of "space heaters" do these people have that keep burning down their houses?  Provided you don't coat them in oil rags, all the electric space heaters I've ever used never had the "burn down the house" feature equipped.


This. I don't understand it. The really old ones had somewhat exposed heating elements that glowed like a toaster oven, but every one I've seen for the past decade is surrounded by ceramic and plastic. They also turn off if tipped over, in case the cat decided to torch the place while you're gone.
 
2014-04-09 05:42:32 PM
Huzaa!
 
2014-04-09 05:53:03 PM
any word on the condition of the pizza?
 
2014-04-09 05:56:17 PM
When the woman returned, she said she fell asleep in the car.

So she was just fine to drive all the way home (close enough to hear the neighbor breaking down her front door) ... but then fell asleep in the car.

// I'm calling insurance scam.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-04-09 05:58:32 PM
lordargent

Alcohol could also explain the situation.
 
2014-04-09 06:01:59 PM
I pick C.
 
2014-04-09 06:06:33 PM

Mark Ratner: Geotpf: What I want to know is, what type of "space heaters" do these people have that keep burning down their houses?  Provided you don't coat them in oil rags, all the electric space heaters I've ever used never had the "burn down the house" feature equipped.

This. I don't understand it. The really old ones had somewhat exposed heating elements that glowed like a toaster oven, but every one I've seen for the past decade is surrounded by ceramic and plastic. They also turn off if tipped over, in case the cat decided to torch the place while you're gone.


Even an antique space heater is relatively safe if you use some common sense. Don't set it where it can come into contact with something flammable.

That said, there is another angle. I have personally witnesses two incidents that if not caught in time could have easily turned into a full fledged electrical fire. A space heater further down the run caused a bad connection at an upstream outlet to heat up. The heat led to oxidation which caused more resistance leading to more heat. In both cases it was caught when someone noticed smoke coming from an outlet. The space heater was in another room, but pulled close to the maximum capacity from the circuit.

Never use those ridiculous backstab terminals on cheap outlets. Actually, never even use cheap outlets, spend a little more and get spec grade stuff. Then either use the screw terminals or pigtail anything that's not end of the run.
 
2014-04-09 06:07:35 PM

Mark Ratner: Geotpf: What I want to know is, what type of "space heaters" do these people have that keep burning down their houses?  Provided you don't coat them in oil rags, all the electric space heaters I've ever used never had the "burn down the house" feature equipped.

This. I don't understand it. The really old ones had somewhat exposed heating elements that glowed like a toaster oven, but every one I've seen for the past decade is surrounded by ceramic and plastic. They also turn off if tipped over, in case the cat decided to torch the place while you're gone.


mine is attached to a gas line.  it's a furnace (or, standing fireplace, or whatever).   there is a fire below a radiator like mesh of metal, all encased in a kind of aluminum shell with a opening facing the room, with glass/plastic/some clear stuff covering the opening where the fire faces the room.

i would rather not use it, but i live in new orleans with 16 ft ceilings, and no insulation anywhere, my central heating is a joke.

So, i could use no heating, and have a house in 30s.

i could rely on central heating, and pay $400 per month to keep the house at a nice 50 degrees (got into the 40s a couple times).

or, i could use the space heaters, with occasional central heating, and pay $100 per month to keep the house at a nice 60 degrees.

while they worked, we opted for the space heater/central heating combo and could survive the first part of winter.

then they started leaking gas, so we closed off the gas lines to them and wore our ski clothes inside.  I don't care how farking cool you are, 40 degrees with 100 percent humidity inside your home is farking cold.  and before you say, pussy, i refer you to 100 percent humidity.  people were visiting from st paul and biatching that new orleans was too farking cold.
 
2014-04-09 06:11:37 PM

pute kisses like a man: Mark Ratner: Geotpf: What I want to know is, what type of "space heaters" do these people have that keep burning down their houses?  Provided you don't coat them in oil rags, all the electric space heaters I've ever used never had the "burn down the house" feature equipped.

This. I don't understand it. The really old ones had somewhat exposed heating elements that glowed like a toaster oven, but every one I've seen for the past decade is surrounded by ceramic and plastic. They also turn off if tipped over, in case the cat decided to torch the place while you're gone.

mine is attached to a gas line.  it's a furnace (or, standing fireplace, or whatever).   there is a fire below a radiator like mesh of metal, all encased in a kind of aluminum shell with a opening facing the room, with glass/plastic/some clear stuff covering the opening where the fire faces the room.

i would rather not use it, but i live in new orleans with 16 ft ceilings, and no insulation anywhere, my central heating is a joke.

So, i could use no heating, and have a house in 30s.

i could rely on central heating, and pay $400 per month to keep the house at a nice 50 degrees (got into the 40s a couple times).

or, i could use the space heaters, with occasional central heating, and pay $100 per month to keep the house at a nice 60 degrees.

while they worked, we opted for the space heater/central heating combo and could survive the first part of winter.

then they started leaking gas, so we closed off the gas lines to them and wore our ski clothes inside.  I don't care how farking cool you are, 40 degrees with 100 percent humidity inside your home is farking cold.  and before you say, pussy, i refer you to 100 percent humidity.  people were visiting from st paul and biatching that new orleans was too farking cold.


Pussy.
 
2014-04-09 06:13:38 PM

Geotpf: What I want to know is, what type of "space heaters" do these people have that keep burning down their houses?  Provided you don't coat them in oil rags, all the electric space heaters I've ever used never had the "burn down the house" feature equipped.


I'm guessing a very old one, or perhaps one of those that hook up to the natural gas supply.

I use one of those small electric ones in my bedroom in the winter, no point in heating the whole house just to be warm at night.  They cost about $20 and I just buy a new one each winter.
 
2014-04-09 06:14:07 PM

pute kisses like a man: Mark Ratner: Geotpf: What I want to know is, what type of "space heaters" do these people have that keep burning down their houses?  Provided you don't coat them in oil rags, all the electric space heaters I've ever used never had the "burn down the house" feature equipped.

This. I don't understand it. The really old ones had somewhat exposed heating elements that glowed like a toaster oven, but every one I've seen for the past decade is surrounded by ceramic and plastic. They also turn off if tipped over, in case the cat decided to torch the place while you're gone.

mine is attached to a gas line.  it's a furnace (or, standing fireplace, or whatever).   there is a fire below a radiator like mesh of metal, all encased in a kind of aluminum shell with a opening facing the room, with glass/plastic/some clear stuff covering the opening where the fire faces the room.

i would rather not use it, but i live in new orleans with 16 ft ceilings, and no insulation anywhere, my central heating is a joke.

So, i could use no heating, and have a house in 30s.

i could rely on central heating, and pay $400 per month to keep the house at a nice 50 degrees (got into the 40s a couple times).

or, i could use the space heaters, with occasional central heating, and pay $100 per month to keep the house at a nice 60 degrees.

while they worked, we opted for the space heater/central heating combo and could survive the first part of winter.

then they started leaking gas, so we closed off the gas lines to them and wore our ski clothes inside.  I don't care how farking cool you are, 40 degrees with 100 percent humidity inside your home is farking cold.  and before you say, pussy, i refer you to 100 percent humidity.  people were visiting from st paul and biatching that new orleans was too farking cold.


That's not a typical space heater, though it sounds like a good idea considering your circumstances. I'm talking about your standard space heater you'd buy at Walmart or Home Depot, and  James10952001makes a good point about causing the cheap wired outlets to overheat and combust.
 
2014-04-09 06:15:25 PM
turn on space heater

4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-04-09 06:17:05 PM

NoahFenze: pute kisses like a man: Mark Ratner: Geotpf: What I want to know is, what type of "space heaters" do these people have that keep burning down their houses?  Provided you don't coat them in oil rags, all the electric space heaters I've ever used never had the "burn down the house" feature equipped.

This. I don't understand it. The really old ones had somewhat exposed heating elements that glowed like a toaster oven, but every one I've seen for the past decade is surrounded by ceramic and plastic. They also turn off if tipped over, in case the cat decided to torch the place while you're gone.

mine is attached to a gas line.  it's a furnace (or, standing fireplace, or whatever).   there is a fire below a radiator like mesh of metal, all encased in a kind of aluminum shell with a opening facing the room, with glass/plastic/some clear stuff covering the opening where the fire faces the room.

i would rather not use it, but i live in new orleans with 16 ft ceilings, and no insulation anywhere, my central heating is a joke.

So, i could use no heating, and have a house in 30s.

i could rely on central heating, and pay $400 per month to keep the house at a nice 50 degrees (got into the 40s a couple times).

or, i could use the space heaters, with occasional central heating, and pay $100 per month to keep the house at a nice 60 degrees.

while they worked, we opted for the space heater/central heating combo and could survive the first part of winter.

then they started leaking gas, so we closed off the gas lines to them and wore our ski clothes inside.  I don't care how farking cool you are, 40 degrees with 100 percent humidity inside your home is farking cold.  and before you say, pussy, i refer you to 100 percent humidity.  people were visiting from st paul and biatching that new orleans was too farking cold.

Pussy.


i meant to omit that part, but hit ADD COMMENT instead.  perhaps out of unconscious spite... or masochism.
 
2014-04-09 06:19:20 PM

ZAZ: lordargent

Alcohol could also explain the situation.


My money's on alcohol, too.
 
2014-04-09 06:20:06 PM
Thanks, Papa John.
 
2014-04-09 06:28:55 PM
So, A + B = C

But I was told no maths
 
2014-04-09 06:41:38 PM

pute kisses like a man: Mark Ratner: Geotpf: What I want to know is, what type of "space heaters" do these people have that keep burning down their houses?  Provided you don't coat them in oil rags, all the electric space heaters I've ever used never had the "burn down the house" feature equipped.

This. I don't understand it. The really old ones had somewhat exposed heating elements that glowed like a toaster oven, but every one I've seen for the past decade is surrounded by ceramic and plastic. They also turn off if tipped over, in case the cat decided to torch the place while you're gone.

mine is attached to a gas line.  it's a furnace (or, standing fireplace, or whatever).   there is a fire below a radiator like mesh of metal, all encased in a kind of aluminum shell with a opening facing the room, with glass/plastic/some clear stuff covering the opening where the fire faces the room.

i would rather not use it, but i live in new orleans with 16 ft ceilings, and no insulation anywhere, my central heating is a joke.

So, i could use no heating, and have a house in 30s.

i could rely on central heating, and pay $400 per month to keep the house at a nice 50 degrees (got into the 40s a couple times).

or, i could use the space heaters, with occasional central heating, and pay $100 per month to keep the house at a nice 60 degrees.

while they worked, we opted for the space heater/central heating combo and could survive the first part of winter.

then they started leaking gas, so we closed off the gas lines to them and wore our ski clothes inside.  I don't care how farking cool you are, 40 degrees with 100 percent humidity inside your home is farking cold.  and before you say, pussy, i refer you to 100 percent humidity.  people were visiting from st paul and biatching that new orleans was too farking cold.


Jeez maybe fix your central heat? I bought a 80K btu 93% efficient gas furnace for 800 bucks a few years ago, installed it myself and it's been fine ever since. Paid for itself already compared to the old one.
 
2014-04-09 06:57:48 PM

ZAZ: lordargent

Alcohol could also explain the situation.


Exhaustion could also do it.
 
2014-04-09 07:02:20 PM

James10952001: Never use those ridiculous backstab terminals on cheap outlets. Actually, never even use cheap outlets, spend a little more and get spec grade stuff. Then either use the screw terminals or pigtail anything that's not end of the run.


SPEAK ENGLISH OR GET OUT OF THE COUNTRY
 
2014-04-09 07:36:17 PM
I am oddly pleased to see that the idiot in this case was a woman.  Equality!
Also, it reminds me of one winter when I was living in a cheap small town trailer court.  It got cold enough that the water supply lines under some of the trailers froze.  A genius neighbor of mine decided to thaw out the pipes under his house with a space heater.  A kerosene space heater.
In less than an hour, his house was gone.  (The response time of the volunteer fire department was actually pretty impressive, and they were able to keep the fire from spreading to any of the surrounding units.)
 
2014-04-09 07:47:46 PM

SmackLT: James10952001: Never use those ridiculous backstab terminals on cheap outlets. Actually, never even use cheap outlets, spend a little more and get spec grade stuff. Then either use the screw terminals or pigtail anything that's not end of the run.

SPEAK ENGLISH OR GET OUT OF THE COUNTRY


IMHO anyone who doesn't understand what I wrote should probably hire an electrician instead of messing with their electrical system.
 
2014-04-09 07:49:26 PM

ReapTheChaos: Geotpf: What I want to know is, what type of "space heaters" do these people have that keep burning down their houses?  Provided you don't coat them in oil rags, all the electric space heaters I've ever used never had the "burn down the house" feature equipped.

I'm guessing a very old one, or perhaps one of those that hook up to the natural gas supply.

I use one of those small electric ones in my bedroom in the winter, no point in heating the whole house just to be warm at night.  They cost about $20 and I just buy a new one each winter.


I got one of those for $20 for my girlfriend's room that's always cold. Works great. I walked in her room the other day and I was sweating my ass off inside 20 seconds. She did burn one out (May have been a fuse I didn't bother checking) when she put it too close to a blanket hanging over a shelf. But at least it didn't burn the house down like whatever this person was using. Easily replaced for $20.

www.green-energy-efficient-homes.com
 
2014-04-09 08:54:21 PM
Get DirecTV. Don't fall asleep in your car while your house is burning down because you left to get a pizza without turning off the space heater.
 
2014-04-10 01:21:52 PM

Rubix^3: ReapTheChaos: Geotpf: What I want to know is, what type of "space heaters" do these people have that keep burning down their houses?  Provided you don't coat them in oil rags, all the electric space heaters I've ever used never had the "burn down the house" feature equipped.

I'm guessing a very old one, or perhaps one of those that hook up to the natural gas supply.

I use one of those small electric ones in my bedroom in the winter, no point in heating the whole house just to be warm at night.  They cost about $20 and I just buy a new one each winter.

I got one of those for $20 for my girlfriend's room that's always cold. Works great. I walked in her room the other day and I was sweating my ass off inside 20 seconds. She did burn one out (May have been a fuse I didn't bother checking) when she put it too close to a blanket hanging over a shelf. But at least it didn't burn the house down like whatever this person was using. Easily replaced for $20.


There's usually a thermal fuse that blows if it gets too hot, and it's not designed to be user replaceable.

One thing worth mentioning is don't get scammed by high priced electric heaters that claim to be more efficient. All electric heaters are virtually 100% efficient converting electricity to heat. The only way you can do better with electricity alone is to use a heat pump which extracts additional heat from the environment by refrigerating the outdoors.
 
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