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(CTV News)   Two things that probably won't exist in 10 years, except at your parents' house: cable TV and landlines   (ctvnews.ca) divider line 74
    More: Obvious, land lines, Canadians, IPTV, convergence, cutters  
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2871 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 Apr 2014 at 10:11 AM (20 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-08 09:52:36 AM
Good. More beer money to watch pirated streams on my cellphone.
 
2014-04-08 09:59:59 AM
Bullshiat. I will always have my land line. When we lost power during Sandy, that farker still worked.
 
2014-04-08 10:20:21 AM
Ditched the landline in 2001 and dumped cable two years ago.  It was a little scary for both endeavors but after a few months it's amazing how little I miss it.

Best part about the landline thing was that I didn't have yet another place to have to check messages.  I have one single point of contact and if you can't reach me there then you're not going to reach me at all, and I'm okay with that.

Best part about cable is that I don't feel like I have to sit back and wait through commercials and I watch more actual TV per session.
 
2014-04-08 10:21:59 AM

ManateeGag: Bullshiat. I will always have my land line. When we lost power during Sandy, that farker still worked.


If you're going to have a landline, it's also good to have an absolutely basic, no-frills wired handset with no batteries that draws its power off the phone line itself (some of you may be too young to know that's even a thing). Keep it in a drawer, just in case.

After Sandy our power was out for days, and any phone that needed batteries for the handset or power for the base station was useless.
 
2014-04-08 10:23:08 AM
POTS or non-cellular phones in the home? I like my VOIP home phone. I use it work for quite a bit. It's not POTS though.

Cable? Nah, that's going to limp on for a long time.
 
2014-04-08 10:26:29 AM
We tried cutting cable. Just grew tiring. Hulu sucks and Netflix is always a season or more behind. Then I was pirating TV shows on top of them both. I ended up pirating more TV shows then streaming on Netflix. Too much work
 
2014-04-08 10:26:41 AM
Cable companies can all DIAF as far as I'm concerned-- They should be forcefully separated from ISPs.

It won't happen, though.  Even worse, seems most cable companies are starting to charge MORE for internet access without at least basic cable.

www.whatistruth.info


Landlines, though?  I sure hope not.  Cell networks have sharply limited capacities.  When something VERY BAD happens in a given area you can guarantee the cell networks will get overloaded and go down faster than Subby's mom on a Friday night.

Landlines can and do get overloaded too, but they are always been FAR more robust.
 
2014-04-08 10:28:47 AM
90 percent of homes still have some form of pay television service (cable/satellite/telco) and fewer than 5 percent of households are what we'd call "cord-cutters" (broadband internet but no pay TV).  That's a far cry from the ~35 percent of households who still have a landline.

I think cable is going to reach a tipping point soon because it's getting too expensive (especially with sports rights climbing so quickly and broadcast networks trying to get into the carriage fee game) but I think we'll see something come along to change the structure of pay television, not the complete elimination of it.  People still want the content even if it's becoming too expensive for them.
 
2014-04-08 10:31:07 AM

ManateeGag: I will always have my land line.


Not if the incumbent telco is allowed to abandon it (which they are doing in various locations, and lobbying state legislatures to permit it where there are regulations against them dropping copper POTS). Replacement... a cellular node mounted to the outside of your house. For the last 15% of people, it won't be "you dropping your land line", but "the company dropping you".
 
2014-04-08 10:31:46 AM
A real life won't exist for many of us either...
 
2014-04-08 10:33:14 AM
One thing I remember from being at my parents' house was the constant phone calls; we checked one day and we had like 70-something phone calls on the missed calls list, all but three were just blockedsender/telemarketing/BS.  Those other three were my family trying to get in touch with each other, and we ended up just calling that member's cell.  Yes, my parents are on the do-not-call lists, but those don't matter.  Still drives me crazy when I visit.  Then again, my dad still pays for his AOL email, so that's just how that generation works I guess.

I just closed on a house, and I don't think I would even let them pay me to set up a land line in my house.  The amount it would take would be enough to cover the mortgage, but then I'd hate living there and want to move anyway.  I give it 15 years before we're bailing out Telecom companies.
 
2014-04-08 10:44:34 AM
...in Canada.
 
2014-04-08 10:48:54 AM
My parents are still convinced that you need to log into AOL first to get onto the internet.
 
2014-04-08 10:52:35 AM
there will always be cable.  The question is will it be in its current format or will they go to a netflix type setup.  Or a pay by channel setup.
 
2014-04-08 10:54:04 AM

czetie: If you're going to have a landline, it's also good to have an absolutely basic, no-frills wired handset with no batteries that draws its power off the phone line itself (some of you may be too young to know that's even a thing). Keep it in a drawer, just in case.


damn right.  ours is on a shelf in the basement.  i just unplugged one of the "fancy" phones and plugged in the regular handset and we were good to go.
 
2014-04-08 10:58:03 AM

ManateeGag: czetie: If you're going to have a landline, it's also good to have an absolutely basic, no-frills wired handset with no batteries that draws its power off the phone line itself (some of you may be too young to know that's even a thing). Keep it in a drawer, just in case.

damn right.  ours is on a shelf in the basement.  i just unplugged one of the "fancy" phones and plugged in the regular handset and we were good to go.


I collect old phones and they work great on my Comcast line.  Something about the real metal bell ringers makes me smile.  Some of them have dials on them and it's kinda funny if the number has a lot of high digits - gotta dial fast or the line cuts out and honks.
 
2014-04-08 11:00:36 AM

ManateeGag: Bullshiat. I will always have my land line. When we lost power during Sandy, that farker still worked.


This. There's no direct correlation between the newness of the shiny pocket toys and the continuing rot of the electricity grid, the sewage systems and the roads, but nonetheless, it exists. We pay for icing while the cake crumbles.
 
2014-04-08 11:03:35 AM

czetie: ManateeGag: Bullshiat. I will always have my land line. When we lost power during Sandy, that farker still worked.

If you're going to have a landline, it's also good to have an absolutely basic, no-frills wired handset with no batteries that draws its power off the phone line itself (some of you may be too young to know that's even a thing). Keep it in a drawer, just in case.

After Sandy our power was out for days, and any phone that needed batteries for the handset or power for the base station was useless.


AND this. Had the old indestructable Bell Touchtone up and running during a 24-hour outage after flooding here in Toronto. Kept my steaks and beer cold with a Honda 2000 and two extension cords. Drinking a cold beer and sitting on the stoop while talking on the phone watching all the cell users go full-on headless chicken?

Priceless.
 
2014-04-08 11:12:39 AM
Ice at the south pole, amiright?
 
2014-04-08 11:25:12 AM
Television is surviving today by inertia alone.

The age of the average viewer is over fifty years old.

And these people age twice as fast as people who don't watch TV.
 
2014-04-08 11:36:56 AM
Landlines? Are those for phones that can't leave the house and used to get overloaded in the evening? Why would anyone pay for that? For only a little bit more, you can have a basic phone that works everywhere. Sure, an occasional disaster will render them useless but it will often ruin landlines, too. What if the power goes out? I've never lost a signal in a power outage, even citywide ones that lasted several hours. So why throw away money on a phone with very limited capabilities?
 
2014-04-08 11:38:58 AM
Heck during Snowcopalapse here in Georgia it snowed 2" and the cell phone networks collapsed except for texting.

Though my electricity and internet was up, so my OOMA box worked fine.
 
2014-04-08 11:46:05 AM
Called a friend of my 7 year old to arrange a play-date.   Got their answering machine.  Told my son and got this conversation:

him: "what do you mean you called his house?  why would you call a house?"

me: "that's the number we have, but they weren't home"

him: "who were you talking to then?"

me: "the answering machine, i left them a message"

him: "you called their house and the house has a machine that answers the phone? wow!  [imagines some retro jetson's future house i guess]"

me: "[finally catching on] heh, yeah. Actually we used to have one but stopped haveing a phone for our house a little after you were born."

him: "huh, i guess it would be cool but you don't really need to call houses I guess."
 
2014-04-08 11:49:59 AM
Yeah, offices aren't dumping landlines.  Submitter is a useful idiot for believing the hype
 
2014-04-08 11:51:35 AM

studebaker hoch: Television is surviving today by inertia alone.

The age of the average broadcast network viewer is over fifty years old.

And these people age twice as fast as people who don't watch TV.


FTFY

Surprisingly, a lot of younger viewers are actually fleeing to cable.  MTV has a median age of 23, Comedy Central of 31, and FX of 38.  They are also using streaming services, but those are actually, and surprisingly, used more as a complement to traditional television than as a replacement (i.e. the more traditional television you watch the more streaming you do as well, generally speaking).
 
2014-04-08 11:51:43 AM

Smeggy Smurf: Yeah, offices aren't dumping landlines.  Submitter is a useful idiot for believing the hype


They're dumping POTS for VOIP
 
2014-04-08 11:56:35 AM
Ditched the land about 10 years ago once I could get wireless broadband to the house.  I've removed all traces of installed phone jacks while renovating said house.  The phone company tried to scare me into keeping the landline by offering a service whereby I would pay $15/mo for 25 calls and $.50/call after that.  I barely make five calls per month anyway, so no thanks.

My cell phone was running low during a winter power outage and I adapted by using my truck as a charging station.  A cell phone doesn't draw much off of a car battery to fully charge.

I've never been interested in cable (satellite) for where I live, and with the above mentioned wireless broadband service, I stream via Netflix and Project Free TV.  I *might* watch broadcast television for two hours per month.

*shrugs*  I can't help it if some people are Luddites.
 
2014-04-08 11:58:10 AM

jumac: there will always be cable.  The question is will it be in its current format or will they go to a netflix type setup.  Or a pay by channel setup.


Cable's (as we know it) death or survival rests almost entirely in a boardroom in Bristol, Connecticut.

The day that ESPN decides to sell "watch all our stuff" subscriptions, it's over. Nothing else is really that relevant.

They are in no hurry to do that.  ~$9 (+ $1 per year going forward to the breaking-point) from 85% of households beats any possible return on the curve of price/subscribers (i.e., they might get 1/3rd of US households at $20 a month.  They could get more households at less $, or fewer households at more $, but never beating the current model for revenue).  Plus, they cross-sell the rest of the Disney/ABC portfolio through "everyone has to have ESPN".

I don't know what might cause ESPN to pull that trigger.  They probably never want to.  But, they have the nuclear kill-switch in their back pocket, any day they choose to use it.
 
2014-04-08 12:01:15 PM

Lawnchair: jumac: there will always be cable.  The question is will it be in its current format or will they go to a netflix type setup.  Or a pay by channel setup.

Cable's (as we know it) death or survival rests almost entirely in a boardroom in Bristol, Connecticut.

The day that ESPN decides to sell "watch all our stuff" subscriptions, it's over. Nothing else is really that relevant.

They are in no hurry to do that.  ~$9 (+ $1 per year going forward to the breaking-point) from 85% of households beats any possible return on the curve of price/subscribers (i.e., they might get 1/3rd of US households at $20 a month.  They could get more households at less $, or fewer households at more $, but never beating the current model for revenue).  Plus, they cross-sell the rest of the Disney/ABC portfolio through "everyone has to have ESPN".

I don't know what might cause ESPN to pull that trigger.  They probably never want to.  But, they have the nuclear kill-switch in their back pocket, any day they choose to use it.


Live sports are the primary reason I haven't cut the cord. Things like HBOGO are a distant second. While I do love watching shows like Archer, Sons of Anarchy, HIMYM, and others, they are available online. If I could get live sports and HBOGO for reasonable prices without cable, I'd cut in a heartbeat.
 
2014-04-08 12:02:50 PM
My comcast internet only bill is 75 dollars. I could upgrade to cable tv fo 79 (for six months).
 
2014-04-08 12:13:49 PM
I get my internet over the landline wiring. No phone, though. Too expensive.
 
2014-04-08 12:14:54 PM

Devo: My comcast internet only bill is 75 dollars. I could upgrade to cable tv fo 79 (for six months).


We did something like that, but mostly because they doubled my HSI speed to 50/10 for another $5/mo.

It was a good deal and we won't even be living in Atlanta long enough to see the promotion to its end, so f*ck it.
 
2014-04-08 12:19:04 PM

Lawnchair: jumac: there will always be cable.  The question is will it be in its current format or will they go to a netflix type setup.  Or a pay by channel setup.

Cable's (as we know it) death or survival rests almost entirely in a boardroom in Bristol, Connecticut.

The day that ESPN decides to sell "watch all our stuff" subscriptions, it's over. Nothing else is really that relevant.

They are in no hurry to do that.  ~$9 (+ $1 per year going forward to the breaking-point) from 85% of households beats any possible return on the curve of price/subscribers (i.e., they might get 1/3rd of US households at $20 a month.  They could get more households at less $, or fewer households at more $, but never beating the current model for revenue).  Plus, they cross-sell the rest of the Disney/ABC portfolio through "everyone has to have ESPN".

I don't know what might cause ESPN to pull that trigger.   They probably never want to.  But, they have the nuclear kill-switch in their back pocket, any day they choose to use it.


Why would they?  Wouldn't you rather charge 85% of households $9/mo with increases hidden in their overall cable bills than try to get those same people to subscribe individually with monthly increases out in the open?
 
2014-04-08 12:25:32 PM
I don't anticipate cancelling my land line, for various reasons.
I have no love for cable TV but it's tied to my internet service. We have only basic cable to start with, which costs us less than $20 month.
I recently picked up an older Roku player, but I'm not yet convinced that is the wave of the future, though it seems like the right direction.
In late February I subscribed to DishWorld to be able to watch the Brazilian carnival goings-on. At the promotional $15/month I like the service, but at the regular $30 it does not seem like a good value anymore.
 
2014-04-08 12:25:39 PM
Joafu: One thing I remember from being at my parents' house was the constant phone calls; we checked one day and we had like 70-something phone calls on the missed calls list, all but three were just blockedsender/telemarketing/BS.

I haven't had a landline since 1998.  My cells* receive exactly zero telemarketing calls.

Meanwhile, my Mom's house receives a telemarketing call every 20 minutes.  And for that generation when the phone rings it's a big farking deal.  It took forever to convince her not to answer every damn call but still every time the phone rings everything must stop until caller ID inevitably reveals the caller.  Holidays are less fun than they used to be - thanks asshole telemarketers, Taft.

*
2nd cell is for work and no work is not meth dealing although that might be more fun except the enslaved by Nazis part
 
2014-04-08 12:26:01 PM

rugman11: 90 percent of homes still have some form of pay television service (cable/satellite/telco) and fewer than 5 percent of households are what we'd call "cord-cutters" (broadband internet but no pay TV).  That's a far cry from the ~35 percent of households who still have a landline.

I think cable is going to reach a tipping point soon because it's getting too expensive (especially with sports rights climbing so quickly and broadcast networks trying to get into the carriage fee game) but I think we'll see something come along to change the structure of pay television, not the complete elimination of it.  People still want the content even if it's becoming too expensive for them.


My money is on some sort of a la carte option.  In the beginning it'll probably be pretty awful, but it will slowly normalize and become a lot better than the current "pay for 3 channels you actually want and subsidize these other 17 you don't, half of which are utterly useless" system.
 
2014-04-08 12:26:34 PM

rugman11: Why would they? Wouldn't you rather charge 85% of households $9/mo with increases hidden in their overall cable bills than try to get those same people to subscribe individually with monthly increases out in the open?


Plus having to have the infrastructure in place to handle the billing and collections.  Is it wiser to deal with a thousand cable companies or millions of households?
 
2014-04-08 12:27:02 PM
*inevitably reveals the caller to be a telemarketer

/obviously
 
2014-04-08 12:28:29 PM

ManateeGag: Bullshiat. I will always have my land line. When we lost power during Sandy, that farker still worked.


You better not switch to FiOS. You've got about 8 hours of "phone still works" time once the power goes out with them.
 
2014-04-08 12:33:50 PM

redmid17: Smeggy Smurf: Yeah, offices aren't dumping landlines.  Submitter is a useful idiot for believing the hype

They're dumping POTS for VOIP


They're still going to maintain a few POTS lines.  I work at a bank, and each branch has a POTS line so they can do remote management/monitoring of routers and switches even if the curcuit at a location is down.

We also have a POTS lines for elevator emergency call buttons, holdup/security alarms, fire alarms, and large sites will have one for emergencies.
 
2014-04-08 12:33:53 PM

Lawnchair: ManateeGag: I will always have my land line.

Not if the incumbent telco is allowed to abandon it (which they are doing in various locations, and lobbying state legislatures to permit it where there are regulations against them dropping copper POTS). Replacement... a cellular node mounted to the outside of your house. For the last 15% of people, it won't be "you dropping your land line", but "the company dropping you".


You must live in Verizon land.
 
2014-04-08 12:56:58 PM

drjekel_mrhyde: You must live in Verizon land.


AT&T (former Southwestern Bell territory in my case) just as much.  They're all pushing this ALEC model bill in the states, which allows them to stop providing copper pair service anywhere they feel like (i.e., rural customers will be cut off first, but eventually anywhere that isn't highly profitable).
 
2014-04-08 12:58:53 PM

redmid17: Smeggy Smurf: Yeah, offices aren't dumping landlines.  Submitter is a useful idiot for believing the hype

They're dumping POTS for VOIP


Who is? The big companies perhaps but what little guy is doing that?  Are the mechanics, the flower shops, the antique stores, the used car dealerships, the VFWs, etc. going to change?  Not a chance in hell.  Landlines aren't going anywhere and anybody that espouses that is a damned fool
 
2014-04-08 01:05:59 PM

Smeggy Smurf: redmid17: Smeggy Smurf: Yeah, offices aren't dumping landlines.  Submitter is a useful idiot for believing the hype

They're dumping POTS for VOIP

Who is? The big companies perhaps but what little guy is doing that?  Are the mechanics, the flower shops, the antique stores, the used car dealerships, the VFWs, etc. going to change?  Not a chance in hell.  Landlines aren't going anywhere and anybody that espouses that is a damned fool


The phone company and cable companies are ditching POTS. It's not an option for building in some areas, and that's increasing. Small shops, especially ones starting up now, are looking at VOIP because of the cost saving options. Most of those places have little or no value for something that is available marginally more than VOIP. POTS obviously has advantages, but those are going to be more useful for residences, which are meant to house people 24/7, and places that require 24/7 uptime on phones (hospitals, banks, government facilities, et al). Small businesses and most organizations have little or no reason to not switch over, especially if they already get internet from a utility or company that can offer them VOIP for cheap.
 
2014-04-08 01:09:58 PM

Smeggy Smurf: Are the mechanics, the flower shops, the antique stores, the used car dealerships, the VFWs, etc. going to change?  Not a chance in hell


My mechanic has an Ooma box.  Lets him do two-line rollover, voicemail, and forwarding to his cell all very easily.

/ dude is a greaser who chews chaw all day, but he ain't dumb
 
2014-04-08 01:22:10 PM

Smeggy Smurf: redmid17: Smeggy Smurf: Yeah, offices aren't dumping landlines.  Submitter is a useful idiot for believing the hype

They're dumping POTS for VOIP

Who is? The big companies perhaps but what little guy is doing that?  Are the mechanics, the flower shops, the antique stores, the used car dealerships, the VFWs, etc. going to change?  Not a chance in hell.  Landlines aren't going anywhere and anybody that espouses that is a damned fool


Yes, when the ISPs say that they can save money by using the ISP's VOIP service through their internet instead of a POTS line the little businesses will switch because most of those businesses will have internet or adopt internet to help their businesses.

Granted in many cases it's still the same company that used to offer them POTS now offering them VOIP, but it's still a shift in technology and you'll see it more and more.
 
2014-04-08 01:29:53 PM
upload.wikimedia.org

i think imax features are 10,000x7000, but there is going to come a point where size, practicality, technology, and our concept of what media 'is,' our new 'role,' in entitled to, intersect.  with a true 3d cinematic experience (needing 2 or 3 individual cameras shooting at least around 5000x3000 each - if we all feel comfortable with 16:9 by then, any standard wider and our necks will constantly hurt), it is going to be expected by the public that imax-level, "avatar" style production become the standard for the $50 movie ticket in 2024.  and we should have 22.2 audio hopefully a few years after that.

likewise, whatever our smartphones have turned into by 2024 (my vote is for disposable contact lenses and earpieces to replace all tangible personal electronic goods such as tvs and smartphones, however it would essentially break the world economy), we will collectively be abusing and abandoning exabytes worth of crap on a daily basis, necessitating a complete rethinking of just what the hell we are doing.

it reminds me of this time in 3rd grade when our teacher told us that we were spinning, 'at about seven hundred fifty miles per hour right now.  if we were at the equator we would be going one thousand miles per hour!'  i, of course, being 8, was supremely confident in my abilities in not only physics but astronomy as well, and simply said, 'bullshiat!,' spending the next 45 minutes locked in the coatroom with the only light being the small slit from the bottom of the door i had just been pushed through.  it was scary there in the black.  i got to go through the other kids coats for change and candy though.  made over $2, and ate as many sour patch kids as i could.
  upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-04-08 01:54:52 PM
Skarekrough: I have one single point of contact and if you can't reach me there then you're not going to reach me at all, and I'm okay with that.

Me too...

www.palospark.org
 
2014-04-08 01:56:36 PM

ManateeGag: Bullshiat. I will always have my land line. When we lost power during Sandy, that farker still worked.


LOL, can you imagine how many times back around 1990 I saw statements like, "I will always use the command line. DOS is better than GUIs because (reason)"?

I'm not saying you're wrong; just that you gave me a vivid flashback. :)

/Also not saying they were wrong to feel that way at the time. Only in their confidence that anything in tech could possibly be "always".
 
2014-04-08 02:15:28 PM
I live in a high rise apartment building, and you need the land line so you can buzz visitors in through the front door. Also, people I owe money to have the land line number, and my friends have my cell phone number. Guess which phone I answer, and which goes to voice mail.

 
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