Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(TwinCities.com)   Searchers looking for missing hikers. Search areas include the Arapahoe National Forest and the southern Indian Ocean   (twincities.com) divider line 111
    More: Sad, Indian Ocean, St. Louis Park, Colorado, St. Louis  
•       •       •

3256 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Apr 2014 at 12:13 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



111 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-04-08 01:28:18 PM  

probesport: Arapahoe?

[static.guim.co.uk image 460x276]


www.iloveyourtee.com
 
2014-04-08 01:30:16 PM  
Alright, summer time camping it is..

/damn nature
//you scary
 
2014-04-08 01:32:45 PM  
what's the snow base depth out there now, at ~11,000 feet?
 
2014-04-08 01:34:05 PM  
Have we considered they are walking hunch over to avoid radar?
 
2014-04-08 01:38:22 PM  
 
2014-04-08 01:41:18 PM  

SlothB77: what's the snow base depth out there now, at ~11,000 feet?


Also:  http://www.nohrsc.noaa.gov/nsa/index.html?region=Central_Rockies
 
2014-04-08 01:42:42 PM  

Mentalpatient87: Keep pouring advice, people, it could save my life one day.


Always carry enough gear to make it overnight.  You don't need a tent but an emergency shelter (aka space blanket), extra layers, rain gear and some method for starting a fire are wise things to have.  Know the signs of altitude sickness and just use common sense.  Leave your route with a friend and expected time back.  If you think you might go on a side trip mark that as a potential route on the map.  Don't count on your cell phone working, btw.

Colorado is gorgeous but it can kill you if you get careless.
 
2014-04-08 01:44:39 PM  

LaRoach: Mentalpatient87: Keep pouring advice, people, it could save my life one day.

Always carry enough gear to make it overnight.  You don't need a tent but an emergency shelter (aka space blanket), extra layers, rain gear and some method for starting a fire are wise things to have.  Know the signs of altitude sickness and just use common sense.  Leave your route with a friend and expected time back.  If you think you might go on a side trip mark that as a potential route on the map.  Don't count on your cell phone working, btw.

Colorado is gorgeous but it can kill you if you get careless.


Yep. And know and carry your Ten Essentials
 
2014-04-08 01:47:45 PM  
The part I don't understand: the remote Rockies that these hikers are lost in are all of thirty miles from Denver.

/death by weather understandable
//death by being lost not so much
 
2014-04-08 01:48:56 PM  
I know...let's go scale a peak.  I mean how hard can it be???
 
2014-04-08 01:52:34 PM  

Sgygus: The part I don't understand: the remote Rockies that these hikers are lost in are all of thirty miles from Denver.

/death by weather understandable
//death by being lost not so much


Well, it's pretty easy to get lost in 30 sq miles of rugged mountainous terrain. Also, it's really more like death by exposure due to being lost with inadequate gear.
 
2014-04-08 01:57:38 PM  

Sgygus: The part I don't understand: the remote Rockies that these hikers are lost in are all of thirty miles from Denver.


I don't think people realize that cell phones just don't work that well in mountain terrain.  Throw in a dose of hypothermia (very common this time of year, the weather here is very fickle) and put them down in a valley and it could take years to find them.

Sadly this somewhat common here.  I don't think they ever found this woman:

http://www.dailycamera.com/ci_23580116/family-gathers-remember-lafay et te-hiker-year-after-she
 
2014-04-08 01:58:56 PM  

Amish Tech Support: Have we considered they are walking hunch over to avoid radar?


Also, I heard the dad had a hiking simulator in his living room.

The son didn't have much experience but he once invited two women along on a hike.
 
2014-04-08 02:06:24 PM  

LaRoach: Mentalpatient87: Keep pouring advice, people, it could save my life one day.

Always carry enough gear to make it overnight.  You don't need a tent but an emergency shelter (aka space blanket), extra layers, rain gear and some method for starting a fire are wise things to have.  Know the signs of altitude sickness and just use common sense.  Leave your route with a friend and expected time back.  If you think you might go on a side trip mark that as a potential route on the map.  Don't count on your cell phone working, btw.

Colorado is gorgeous but it can kill you if you get careless.


This is a big one - these guys came from Minnesota where the highest point is about 1000' less then the lowest point in Colorado.  They likely flew in to Denver and drove straight out to the trail head in the neighborhood of 11,000'.  Even if they took a day or so to acclimate to Denver altitude (5000'), it won't matter much.  I know people who've lived at 7000' for years who get sick at 10,000'  And it really hits you if you get dehydrated - you may feel fine stating out, and get hammered once you start drying out.
 
2014-04-08 02:13:30 PM  

SlothB77: echo lake sits below Mt Evans, a 14er.  From Echo Lake trailhead, there are a couple hikes of about 10 miles that go to Chicago Lake and loop back, ranging in elevation from about 10,5 to 11,5.


And this time of year is the perfect time of year to try to bag a 14er, said the guy from flatland.
 
2014-04-08 02:14:20 PM  

blatz514: whither_apophis: I'm holding a chicken in the air in soldarity...

So you're choking it?




Not quite

/summer song warning
 
2014-04-08 02:17:19 PM  

Willie_The_Pimp: Well, it's pretty easy to get lost in 30 sq miles of rugged mountainous terrain.


I'm going to have to disagree with you, Willie, especially in this case.  If you are lost, all you have to do is walk in the easiest direction, downhill.  The area around Mt. Evans is dotted with houses.  Best case scenario is that these two are holed up in some cabin.

/but yes, hypothermia can kill you quickly
 
2014-04-08 02:17:44 PM  

Lamberts Ho Man: LaRoach: Mentalpatient87: Keep pouring advice, people, it could save my life one day.

Always carry enough gear to make it overnight.  You don't need a tent but an emergency shelter (aka space blanket), extra layers, rain gear and some method for starting a fire are wise things to have.  Know the signs of altitude sickness and just use common sense.  Leave your route with a friend and expected time back.  If you think you might go on a side trip mark that as a potential route on the map.  Don't count on your cell phone working, btw.

Colorado is gorgeous but it can kill you if you get careless.

This is a big one - these guys came from Minnesota where the highest point is about 1000' less then the lowest point in Colorado.  They likely flew in to Denver and drove straight out to the trail head in the neighborhood of 11,000'.  Even if they took a day or so to acclimate to Denver altitude (5000'), it won't matter much.  I know people who've lived at 7000' for years who get sick at 10,000'  And it really hits you if you get dehydrated - you may feel fine stating out, and get hammered once you start drying out.


THIS THIS THIS

one of the fun/mean things to do is take flatlanders out drinking the first day off the plane.
 
2014-04-08 02:18:32 PM  

Willie_The_Pimp: LaRoach: Mentalpatient87: Keep pouring advice, people, it could save my life one day.

Always carry enough gear to make it overnight.  You don't need a tent but an emergency shelter (aka space blanket), extra layers, rain gear and some method for starting a fire are wise things to have.  Know the signs of altitude sickness and just use common sense.  Leave your route with a friend and expected time back.  If you think you might go on a side trip mark that as a potential route on the map.  Don't count on your cell phone working, btw.

Colorado is gorgeous but it can kill you if you get careless.

Yep. And know and carry your Ten Essentials


I often get laughed at for it, but I add a Thermarest trail seat to that list.  Sure it's useful for sitting in snowy/wet conditions, but it also works as a splint, a bivy pad if you need to sit out the night, and a mini sled (this last one not so useful, just fun).
 
2014-04-08 02:21:22 PM  

SlothB77: echo lake sits below Mt Evans, a 14er.  From Echo Lake trailhead, there are a couple hikes of about 10 miles that go to Chicago Lake and loop back, ranging in elevation from about 10,5 to 11,5.


How many pings?
 
2014-04-08 02:27:19 PM  

whither_apophis: blatz514: whither_apophis: I'm holding a chicken in the air in soldarity...

So you're choking it?

Not quite

/summer song warning


static.tumblr.com

/I larfed
 
2014-04-08 02:31:44 PM  

SurelyShirley: SlothB77: echo lake sits below Mt Evans, a 14er.  From Echo Lake trailhead, there are a couple hikes of about 10 miles that go to Chicago Lake and loop back, ranging in elevation from about 10,5 to 11,5.

How many pings?


One

encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com
 
2014-04-08 02:33:02 PM  

lostindenver: Lamberts Ho Man: LaRoach: Mentalpatient87: Keep pouring advice, people, it could save my life one day.

Always carry enough gear to make it overnight.  You don't need a tent but an emergency shelter (aka space blanket), extra layers, rain gear and some method for starting a fire are wise things to have.  Know the signs of altitude sickness and just use common sense.  Leave your route with a friend and expected time back.  If you think you might go on a side trip mark that as a potential route on the map.  Don't count on your cell phone working, btw.

Colorado is gorgeous but it can kill you if you get careless.

This is a big one - these guys came from Minnesota where the highest point is about 1000' less then the lowest point in Colorado.  They likely flew in to Denver and drove straight out to the trail head in the neighborhood of 11,000'.  Even if they took a day or so to acclimate to Denver altitude (5000'), it won't matter much.  I know people who've lived at 7000' for years who get sick at 10,000'  And it really hits you if you get dehydrated - you may feel fine stating out, and get hammered once you start drying out.

THIS THIS THIS

one of the fun/mean things to do is take flatlanders out drinking the first day off the plane.


<csb>
My first time skiing in Colorado was on a spring break trip, departing from near sea level.  Went from sea level to about 9500' in about 6 hours.  Being college kids, the first thing everybody wanted to do was go out drinking.  Two of them ended up in the ER that night - stood up from the bar, and hit their head on it on the way down.  Alcohol hits you much faster up there.
</csb>
 
2014-04-08 02:37:02 PM  

Sgygus: Willie_The_Pimp: Well, it's pretty easy to get lost in 30 sq miles of rugged mountainous terrain.

I'm going to have to disagree with you, Willie, especially in this case.  If you are lost, all you have to do is walk in the easiest direction, downhill.  The area around Mt. Evans is dotted with houses.  Best case scenario is that these two are holed up in some cabin.

/but yes, hypothermia can kill you quickly


Yes, it's true that you can follow a drainage and eventually get out of the front range, but it's very disorienting if you're in a whiteout and you could end up in a canyon with no walkable exit. Also, you're assuming that they understood the terrain and the drainages in the front range. Also, I wouldn't exactly say dotted with houses. Yes there are houses throughout that area, but not that many inside the NF, and you could easily miss them. People get lost in the boulder and jeffco mountain parks all the time and those are much less remote than the ANF.
 
2014-04-08 02:39:45 PM  
Good, good. Any advice for bringing along my dog? I was thinking about buying one of those little saddle bag things so she can carry her share...

How about wildlife? Is there any merit to the idea of "marking your territory" with bear mace at your camp site to keep them away? I heard that suggested from someone.
 
2014-04-08 02:39:52 PM  

Lamberts Ho Man: lostindenver: Lamberts Ho Man: LaRoach: Mentalpatient87: Keep pouring advice, people, it could save my life one day.

Always carry enough gear to make it overnight.  You don't need a tent but an emergency shelter (aka space blanket), extra layers, rain gear and some method for starting a fire are wise things to have.  Know the signs of altitude sickness and just use common sense.  Leave your route with a friend and expected time back.  If you think you might go on a side trip mark that as a potential route on the map.  Don't count on your cell phone working, btw.

Colorado is gorgeous but it can kill you if you get careless.

This is a big one - these guys came from Minnesota where the highest point is about 1000' less then the lowest point in Colorado.  They likely flew in to Denver and drove straight out to the trail head in the neighborhood of 11,000'.  Even if they took a day or so to acclimate to Denver altitude (5000'), it won't matter much.  I know people who've lived at 7000' for years who get sick at 10,000'  And it really hits you if you get dehydrated - you may feel fine stating out, and get hammered once you start drying out.

THIS THIS THIS

one of the fun/mean things to do is take flatlanders out drinking the first day off the plane.

<csb>
My first time skiing in Colorado was on a spring break trip, departing from near sea level.  Went from sea level to about 9500' in about 6 hours.  Being college kids, the first thing everybody wanted to do was go out drinking.  Two of them ended up in the ER that night - stood up from the bar, and hit their head on it on the way down.  Alcohol hits you much faster up there.
</csb>


Do not drink at high altitudes.
 
2014-04-08 02:45:18 PM  

JoieD'Zen: Lamberts Ho Man: lostindenver: Lamberts Ho Man: LaRoach: Mentalpatient87: Keep pouring advice, people, it could save my life one day.

Always carry enough gear to make it overnight.  You don't need a tent but an emergency shelter (aka space blanket), extra layers, rain gear and some method for starting a fire are wise things to have.  Know the signs of altitude sickness and just use common sense.  Leave your route with a friend and expected time back.  If you think you might go on a side trip mark that as a potential route on the map.  Don't count on your cell phone working, btw.

Colorado is gorgeous but it can kill you if you get careless.

This is a big one - these guys came from Minnesota where the highest point is about 1000' less then the lowest point in Colorado.  They likely flew in to Denver and drove straight out to the trail head in the neighborhood of 11,000'.  Even if they took a day or so to acclimate to Denver altitude (5000'), it won't matter much.  I know people who've lived at 7000' for years who get sick at 10,000'  And it really hits you if you get dehydrated - you may feel fine stating out, and get hammered once you start drying out.

THIS THIS THIS

one of the fun/mean things to do is take flatlanders out drinking the first day off the plane.

<csb>
My first time skiing in Colorado was on a spring break trip, departing from near sea level.  Went from sea level to about 9500' in about 6 hours.  Being college kids, the first thing everybody wanted to do was go out drinking.  Two of them ended up in the ER that night - stood up from the bar, and hit their head on it on the way down.  Alcohol hits you much faster up there.
</csb>

Do not drink at high altitudes.


Well, to be fair, it is a cheaper night out for the same buzz.
 
2014-04-08 03:02:20 PM  

Mentalpatient87: Is there any merit to the idea of "marking your territory" with bear mace at your camp site to keep them away?


I've honestly never heard of that...  It's a good idea to call the Rangers ahead of your trip to find out what kind of bear activity is going on in the area you plan to be in.  You can get bear vaults to keep your food in (and you should use them).  The usual thing to do is store your food some distance down wind from your campsite (100 yards comes to mind) and also cook away from your site (think a big triangle, food, camp, cook station).  Never put food in your tent as bears and other things that like to chew will happily come after it.

As for Rover just keep in mind that a mountain lion will happily use her as a meal if she gets too far from you.  It's not common but it can happen.  Same is true for children.

Oh yeah, watch out for moose.  Those suckers can be mean!

The most important thing is know what you don't know.  If you're somewhere and start thinking "Heyyyy, I might be getting in over my head here..." trust that instinct and back out.  The trail will still be there next summer and you won't make the news.  I believe REI even has free classes on backpacking and camping to get people started.  Join a backpacking club to hang out with more experienced people.  Take a first aid class, use sunscreen, don't play in traffic... :)
 
2014-04-08 03:12:12 PM  
See if the wife recently bought a giant life insurance policy on them.
 
2014-04-08 03:13:18 PM  

JoieD'Zen: Lamberts Ho Man: lostindenver: Lamberts Ho Man: LaRoach: Mentalpatient87: Keep pouring advice, people, it could save my life one day.

Always carry enough gear to make it overnight.  You don't need a tent but an emergency shelter (aka space blanket), extra layers, rain gear and some method for starting a fire are wise things to have.  Know the signs of altitude sickness and just use common sense.  Leave your route with a friend and expected time back.  If you think you might go on a side trip mark that as a potential route on the map.  Don't count on your cell phone working, btw.

Colorado is gorgeous but it can kill you if you get careless.

This is a big one - these guys came from Minnesota where the highest point is about 1000' less then the lowest point in Colorado.  They likely flew in to Denver and drove straight out to the trail head in the neighborhood of 11,000'.  Even if they took a day or so to acclimate to Denver altitude (5000'), it won't matter much.  I know people who've lived at 7000' for years who get sick at 10,000'  And it really hits you if you get dehydrated - you may feel fine stating out, and get hammered once you start drying out.

THIS THIS THIS

one of the fun/mean things to do is take flatlanders out drinking the first day off the plane.

<csb>
My first time skiing in Colorado was on a spring break trip, departing from near sea level.  Went from sea level to about 9500' in about 6 hours.  Being college kids, the first thing everybody wanted to do was go out drinking.  Two of them ended up in the ER that night - stood up from the bar, and hit their head on it on the way down.  Alcohol hits you much faster up there.
</csb>

Do not drink at high altitudes.


Uh oh, I live at 8,000 feet and am a lush. I also hike to huts above 10,000 feet and really put my liver through its paces there. I still type can OK, though.
 
2014-04-08 03:17:37 PM  

Mentalpatient87: Good, good. Any advice for bringing along my dog? I was thinking about buying one of those little saddle bag things so she can carry her share...

How about wildlife? Is there any merit to the idea of "marking your territory" with bear mace at your camp site to keep them away? I heard that suggested from someone.


That's a bad idea. They tested the theory on a bench in Yellowstone, I think. The video showed bears sniffing the bench and the rubbing all over it like a cat with a new catnip toy. They seemed to really like it.
 
2014-04-08 03:18:51 PM  

Mentalpatient87: Good, good. Any advice for bringing along my dog? I was thinking about buying one of those little saddle bag things so she can carry her share...

How about wildlife? Is there any merit to the idea of "marking your territory" with bear mace at your camp site to keep them away? I heard that suggested from someone.


Well dogs need to acclimate too. And don't just assume that your dog is up for an all day hike up a 14er. Make sure you keep long hikes within their limits. I've had more than a few friends who have had to carry their dog out.

As far as bears go, they are around and you will see them while out on the trail. I'd keep a can of mace but I wouldn't waste it by spraying it around on anything but a bear and I'd want a full can if that happened. Better to practice proper food handling for bear country. If a bear smells you frying up some fresh caught trout, he's not going to care what you sprayed on the trees.
 
2014-04-08 03:47:09 PM  

LaRoach: Sgygus: The part I don't understand: the remote Rockies that these hikers are lost in are all of thirty miles from Denver.

I don't think people realize that cell phones just don't work that well in mountain terrain.


You know what does?

www.anico.hu

www.radioscanner.ru


Ham radio.

Take a Yaesu FT-817nd with you, with the internal battery back, and a simple wire antenna you can throw into the trees, or even support with a couple of hiking sticks a few feet off the ground, and you'll get somebody if you call mayday.

If you put up a low antenna and you use the lowest 4 bands on that radio, you're essentially doing NVIS (Near Vertical Incidence Skywave).   Sending the signal mostly up instead of towards the horizon, and it gets bounced back down.

That does two things for you:  First, it let's you talk to someone despite there being massive mountains between you that would normally block the signal, and second, that limits the area that can hear you to a couple or 300 miles in diameter at most, ie., people who could reasonably know who to contact and get help to you fast.
 
2014-04-08 03:53:57 PM  
Well, if there's one thing I learned last year, hauling my supplies for the weekend on my back, it's that every little bit of weight counts. And a HAM radio looks unduly heavy and not needed for survival as long as I follow the other rules.

/and batteries?
//YOU carry it
 
2014-04-08 03:54:46 PM  
Sorry, hikers, but I LOLed.

We should probably search the Indian Ocean every time someone goes missing, just in case.

Don't worry, if the search parties find something, CNN will let us know.
 
2014-04-08 03:57:56 PM  

dittybopper: You know what does?  Ham radio.


Yep, my trusty VX-5R goes with me anytime I'm in the back country.  My brother and I have a standard plan where if a rescue is ever needed let the authorities know to try the 2 meter band at the top of every hour to try and make contact.
 
2014-04-08 04:03:37 PM  
I mean, how much weight am I looking at, as well as cost, for an emergency backup plan? Is it something you think I honestly NEED? it looks cool, but I don't know if I have the room for it.
 
2014-04-08 04:23:18 PM  

Mentalpatient87: I mean, how much weight am I looking at, as well as cost, for an emergency backup plan? Is it something you think I honestly NEED? it looks cool, but I don't know if I have the room for it.


Ham radio seems a bit much. If I'm that concerned, I'll carry a spot or other satellite locator.
 
2014-04-08 04:25:39 PM  

Mentalpatient87: I mean, how much weight am I looking at, as well as cost, for an emergency backup plan? Is it something you think I honestly NEED? it looks cool, but I don't know if I have the room for it.


An EPIRB weighs less than a pound. A PLB weighs less than half that.

http://www.rei.com/product/843146/acr-electronics-resqlink-406-gps-p er sonal-locator-beacon#specsTab

I wouldn't venture more than a couple miles from a trailhead without one, no matter what time of year. The Rockies have some very wild weather, the reason the CO foothills and plains are an arid desert is because the Rockies usually do a pretty good job of soaking up the precipitation from weather headed east. I've been in rainstorms that produced rainfall so heavy that it would crush a tent under the weight of the water. Mudslides and rock slides are common. Not to mention other various threats to your health, old mineshafts, animals, mentally disturbed vagrants and drug addicts, poachers, you name it. Hell I don't even venture into NF land without at least a sidearm with some snake shot loaded, usually the first two rounds and the rest loaded with ball to punch through thick hide if the loud noise doesn't scare them off. And a few tracer rounds in pocket to serve as flares.

The Rockies are beautiful don't get me wrong, but if you're going off and hiking about outside of well established camp grounds and trails you need to be well prepared. The general rule of thumb is if there isn't a paved parking lot, you're pretty much on your own with no help inbound for at least 4-6 hours after you pop your beacon. The further west you go, add 3 hours for every half hour driving down I-70 away from the "tourist traps." Places like Deer Lake or Mirror Lake? You're in for a 24 hour wait before rescue teams arrive. And there is a LOT that can happen to you to put you in a situation to need rescue.
 
2014-04-08 04:29:34 PM  

Mentalpatient87: I mean, how much weight am I looking at, as well as cost, for an emergency backup plan? Is it something you think I honestly NEED? it looks cool, but I don't know if I have the room for it.


That Yaesu is a relatively expensive radio - in the neighborhood of $600 I think.  And you're dependent on somebody happening to be listening/scanning on your HF frequency within the footprint of your bounce.  I haven't done much HF, so I don't really know how likely that is.  But it will definitely get out of places that a 2 meter radio won't.

On the other hand, a cheap handheld 2M radio and 1/4 wave whip can be had for < $50 and I've been pretty surprised what we've been able to hit with those.  And 2M repeaters very often have somebody listening to them, even if they aren't actively talking.  But you won't have repeater coverage everywhere, and a mountain or hill between you and the repeater can easily cut you off.  Did I mention they're cheap?

The satellite EPIRB units like the SPOT I linked to earlier will get out almost anywhere and will relay your message and GPS coordinates to the relevant local authorities.  They're somewhere between the 2M radios and the Yaesu (which is very much on my "want" list) in terms of initial cost and require an annual subscription.  The Ham radios also require a certain level of experience and knowledge to operate effectively, while the EPIRB can be as simple as basically a panic button.

You need to assess your need based on your experience and the area you'll be travelling in.
 
2014-04-08 04:34:24 PM  

Mentalpatient87: Is it something you think I honestly NEED?


Now that we've driven you into a panic... :P  It's all down to common sense.  If I'm in an area that's well travelled I don't worry about it too much.  Go do Mt. Bierstadt in the summer and it's practically a highway up there.  I personally carry a small hand held radio most of the time but I'm happy to say I never needed it.  When I do patrols (fun fact, you can be a volunteer "citizen ranger" in Boulder County) I always carry my radio just in case.  Again, never needed it but I have handed out first aid supplies and water more than once.

Earlier in the thread someone linked to the Ten Essentials. Start with those and work forward.  You like winter skiing in the back country?  Learn to use an avy probe and beacon.  You like going deep into Weminuche?  Consider a SPOT or ELT beacon and/or handheld ham radio.  It all depends on what you want to do and how far your skills and budget will take you.  The good news is CO is absolutely filled with people who do this all the time so there's no lack of opinions and resources.
 
2014-04-08 04:47:02 PM  

Erix: Willie_The_Pimp: LaRoach: Mentalpatient87: Keep pouring advice, people, it could save my life one day.

Always carry enough gear to make it overnight.  You don't need a tent but an emergency shelter (aka space blanket), extra layers, rain gear and some method for starting a fire are wise things to have.  Know the signs of altitude sickness and just use common sense.  Leave your route with a friend and expected time back.  If you think you might go on a side trip mark that as a potential route on the map.  Don't count on your cell phone working, btw.

Colorado is gorgeous but it can kill you if you get careless.

Yep. And know and carry your Ten Essentials

I often get laughed at for it, but I add a Thermarest trail seat to that list.  Sure it's useful for sitting in snowy/wet conditions, but it also works as a splint, a bivy pad if you need to sit out the night, and a mini sled (this last one not so useful, just fun).


I always carry a sit pad. It's super light and it's amazing how much warmer you stay just by sitting on that instead of the ground.
 
2014-04-08 04:52:46 PM  
Well, I have the ten essentials covered, at least. I read the list and was thinking "who the hell goes out without this stuff?"
 
2014-04-08 04:52:50 PM  

LaRoach: Mentalpatient87: Is it something you think I honestly NEED?

Now that we've driven you into a panic... :P  It's all down to common sense.  If I'm in an area that's well travelled I don't worry about it too much.  Go do Mt. Bierstadt in the summer and it's practically a highway up there.  I personally carry a small hand held radio most of the time but I'm happy to say I never needed it.  When I do patrols (fun fact, you can be a volunteer "citizen ranger" in Boulder County) I always carry my radio just in case.  Again, never needed it but I have handed out first aid supplies and water more than once.

Earlier in the thread someone linked to the Ten Essentials. Start with those and work forward.  You like winter skiing in the back country?  Learn to use an avy probe and beacon.  You like going deep into Weminuche?  Consider a SPOT or ELT beacon and/or handheld ham radio.  It all depends on what you want to do and how far your skills and budget will take you.  The good news is CO is absolutely filled with people who do this all the time so there's no lack of opinions and resources.


Another thing that's often overlooked. Get a map and compass and know how to use them. Sure, a gps is easier, but there ain't no batteries to run out on my compass. You can get USGS topographical quads for just about anywhere you're going to be in the US and so long as you know how to read a topo and shoot a bearing you can get yourself un-lost.
 
2014-04-08 04:59:24 PM  

Mentalpatient87: Well, I have the ten essentials covered, at least. I read the list and was thinking "who the hell goes out without this stuff?"


You'd be amazed. The best is when you're coming down off a 14'er around 11:30am to beat the thunderstorm that is absolutely going to hit in about an hour and you see people walking up in shorts and a tee with a quart of water and nothing else.

Speaking of thunderstorms, you are practically guaranteed to have lightning in the afternoon in the high country from June-August. You should always be below treeline before noon, 1 at the latest.
 
2014-04-08 05:12:22 PM  

Willie_The_Pimp: Mentalpatient87: Well, I have the ten essentials covered, at least. I read the list and was thinking "who the hell goes out without this stuff?"

You'd be amazed. The best is when you're coming down off a 14'er around 11:30am to beat the thunderstorm that is absolutely going to hit in about an hour and you see people walking up in shorts and a tee with a quart of water and nothing else.

Speaking of thunderstorms, you are practically guaranteed to have lightning in the afternoon in the high country from June-August. You should always be below treeline before noon, 1 at the latest.


Being on a well worn trail when you're about to have torrential downpours is a pretty fun way to get washed off a cliff, that's for sure.

And I tend to hike to well out of the way lakes to camp overnight for meteor showers, a few of them are above the treeline. I'll have to keep that second part in mind. Although I live in MN now, so it might be a moot point.
 
2014-04-08 05:19:43 PM  
Kind of an odd time to hike Echo Lake. Snowshoe, maybe. XCountry, maybe. Hike?

media.thedenverchannel.com
 
2014-04-08 06:45:18 PM  

Willie_The_Pimp: It's amazing how often this happens. Spring in the CO Rockies is really dangerous. March and April are our snowiest months and the weather is very unpredictable. You don't even need precipitation. Just wind alone can cause white out conditions and deposit feet of snow in an hour or two. People come here underestimating the weather and the effects of altitude. The don't have adequate gear, the don't plan for how long it takes to go a mile at altitude, they don't leave a plan with anyone.

If I've learned anything living here it's that you don't fark with the Rockies. Know your shiat, have the right gear, and leave a detailed trip plan with someone. Also, know when to turn back, don't let your ego get in the way.


Mucho This-o.
 
2014-04-08 06:52:23 PM  
Thanks for the advice everyone. I'll be certain to take it slow. It'll probably be a year or two after I move before I can really get the time to rough it. No hurries.
 
2014-04-08 06:52:48 PM  

Mentalpatient87: Keep pouring advice, people, it could save my life one day.


OK, here's some.  Get REAL good with map and compass.  Leave the GPS in the car where it won't get you killed if it gets wet, dropped, or too cold for the batteries to function.  Hiked off a glacier in a sub-zero total whiteout some years ago with M&P.

Plus, map and compass is (I think) a lot of fun,

As to the guy and his son--sad.  When I read "from out of state" and "going to scale a peak"...blood ran a bit cold for a second or two.  I have a feeling they really didn't have the ability to do a risk assessment of what they were going to do.  Hope I'm wrong.
 
Displayed 50 of 111 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report