If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(SeattlePI)   The next domino to fall in the nationwide effort to legalize marijuana comes from the great state of Maryland   (blog.seattlepi.com) divider line 67
    More: Cool, marijuana, Maryland Legislature, Martin O'Malley, regulatory offences, Field Poll  
•       •       •

5900 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Apr 2014 at 6:46 AM (28 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



67 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-04-08 06:48:07 AM  
Prohibition doesn't work
 
2014-04-08 06:55:33 AM  
Meh. I lost all respect for Maryland in 1977.
www.trbimg.com
 
2014-04-08 06:57:13 AM  
Don't you mean Maryjaneland?
 
2014-04-08 06:57:59 AM  
There have been a lot of dumb laws passed in this country.  Prohibition of marijuana is right up there with the dumbest of them.  It blows my mind that anyone still defends it.
 
2014-04-08 07:07:27 AM  
I would like to go see a Baltimore game high.  Nice place to visit.
Go SOX!
 
Skr
2014-04-08 07:09:29 AM  
That Governor definitely has his talking point down. Excellent

"I now think that decriminalizing the possession of marijuana is an acknowledgment of the low priority that our courts, our prosecutors, our police and the vast majority of our citizens already attach to this transgression of public order and public health.

"Such an acknowledgment in law might even lead to a greater focus on far more serious threats to public safety and the lives of our citizens."
 
2014-04-08 07:12:27 AM  
Doesn't having 10 grams of marijuana on you mean that you bought it somewhere?

I assume they would still prosecute the suppliers.  So that makes this make less sense.  It's a crime to sell someone something that's not a crime for them to possess.

It just seems a bit weird.  I guess this is intended to be the thin edge of the wedge, today it's decriminalizing recreational quantities, tomorrow that might be expanded a bit, then it becomes hard to tell who a supplier is, etc.

Not like I really care, I don't use it and I don't live in Maryland.
 
2014-04-08 07:12:31 AM  

Skr: That Governor definitely has his talking point down. Excellent

"I now think that decriminalizing the possession of marijuana is an acknowledgment of the low priority that our courts, our prosecutors, our police and the vast majority of our citizens already attach to this transgression of public order and public health.

"Such an acknowledgment in law might even lead to a greater focus on far more serious threats to public safety and the lives of our citizens."


Dude wants to be president SOOOO bad.
 
2014-04-08 07:13:33 AM  
curtishendricksonthewire.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-04-08 07:26:18 AM  

Skr: That Governor definitely has his talking point down. Excellent

"I now think that decriminalizing the possession of marijuana is an acknowledgment of the low priority that our courts, our prosecutors, our police and the vast majority of our citizens already attach to this transgression of public order and public health.

"Such an acknowledgment in law might even lead to a greater focus on far more serious threats to public safety and the lives of our citizens."


So it's a gateway?
 
2014-04-08 07:29:53 AM  
The punishment would be stiffer for those younger: 18 to 20-year-olds would have to appear in court, where they could be ordered to undergo treatment. Juveniles would continue to be treated through the justice system.

Treatment?  For Pot "Addiction"?
This treatment is probably "torture".

Those old pampered, wealthy, privileged, white, wrinkled bald men that write these laws are living in an alternate reality - farkin' scared senile old coots.
 
2014-04-08 07:31:55 AM  
We really need D.C. to legalize it.  If we hit that bullseye, the rest of the dominoes should fall like a house of cards. Checkmate.
 
2014-04-08 07:32:14 AM  
What about possessing more than 10grams?  This is relevant to some of us.  10gs is a week's worth..
 
2014-04-08 07:33:53 AM  
They just have to stay in Hamsterdam--

vernonFL: [curtishendricksonthewire.files.wordpress.com image 400x300]


Dammit!
 
2014-04-08 07:52:10 AM  

Mose: There have been a lot of dumb laws passed in this country.  Prohibition of marijuana is right up there with the dumbest of them.  It blows my mind that anyone still defends it.


Because the negros will rape our white women! They made a documentary all about it.
 
2014-04-08 08:07:51 AM  
But what about the prison industry? How are they going to find enough inmates to stay in business if you can't serve time for pot? THINK OF THE PRISONS!
 
2014-04-08 08:08:15 AM  
Meh. Stil illegal.

As for court ordered treatment, here's the thing: if you're getting caught at this point, and you piss off the cop enough that they arrest you (instead of just stealing your weed and laughing at you) you're probably not in the "recreational user" or even "functional addict" zone, and a couple sit-downs with a therapist personably wouldn't hurt.
 
2014-04-08 08:10:20 AM  
This is all fine and dandy, but I wish they'd make it illegal to dance in public. That's when the real crimes happen.
 
2014-04-08 08:11:09 AM  

Iszael: Doesn't having 10 grams of marijuana on you mean that you bought it somewhere?


No, it is easily grown, however you'd end up netting more than 10 grams.  Just don't travel with it.

I assume they would still prosecute the suppliers.  So that makes this make less sense.  It's a crime to sell someone something that's not a crime for them to possess.

I don't know where you've been, but this is how decriminalization works everywhere.  There are almost two dozen US states that have decriminalized small amounts (i.e. first time possession less than a fixed amount results in civil, NOT criminal penalties)

It just seems a bit weird.  I guess this is intended to be the thin edge of the wedge, today it's decriminalizing recreational quantities, tomorrow that might be expanded a bit, then it becomes hard to tell who a supplier is, etc.

Seriously, are you living under a rock?  There are now two US states where it is 100% legal. 

Not like I really care, I don't use it and I don't live in Maryland.

If you are from the US, there is about a 1 in 3 chance that you live in a state that has decriminalized personal possession.  If you are from Israel, they have decriminalized personal possession.  And yet the world marches on... Oh the horror.
 
2014-04-08 08:11:39 AM  
O Maryland, my Maryland.   I haven't smoked in a long time, but might have to in honor of the event.
 
2014-04-08 08:17:09 AM  

Blushing Wall Flower: This is all fine and dandy, but I wish they'd make it illegal to dance in public. That's when the real crimes happen.


Dancing in the Street where you live?
 
2014-04-08 08:17:29 AM  

Skr: That Governor definitely has his talking point down. Excellent

"I now think that decriminalizing the possession of marijuana is an acknowledgment of the low priority that our courts, our prosecutors, our police and the vast majority of our citizens already attach to this transgression of public order and public health.

"Such an acknowledgment in law might even lead to a greater focus on far more serious threats to public safety and the lives of our citizens."


Amen
 
2014-04-08 08:18:13 AM  
Big Marijuana $mell$ profit$
 
2014-04-08 08:22:19 AM  

Day_Old_Dutchie: The punishment would be stiffer for those younger: 18 to 20-year-olds would have to appear in court, where they could be ordered to undergo treatment. Juveniles would continue to be treated through the justice system.

Treatment?  For Pot "Addiction"?
This treatment is probably "torture".

Those old pampered, wealthy, privileged, white, wrinkled bald men that write these laws are living in an alternate reality - farkin' scared senile old coots.


Of course they want people to go to $ub$tance Abu$e Treatment.
 
2014-04-08 08:27:19 AM  

lindalouwho: Blushing Wall Flower: This is all fine and dandy, but I wish they'd make it illegal to dance in public. That's when the real crimes happen.

Dancing in the Street where you live?


Damn kids.
 
2014-04-08 08:35:14 AM  

gfid: Day_Old_Dutchie: The punishment would be stiffer for those younger: 18 to 20-year-olds would have to appear in court, where they could be ordered to undergo treatment. Juveniles would continue to be treated through the justice system.

Treatment?  For Pot "Addiction"?
This treatment is probably "torture".

Those old pampered, wealthy, privileged, white, wrinkled bald men that write these laws are living in an alternate reality - farkin' scared senile old coots.

Of course they want people to go to $ub$tance Abu$e Treatment.


Makes you wonder if prisons are buying stock in rehabs to offset future losses.
 
2014-04-08 08:43:08 AM  
The real epidemic is the widespread confusion about what "decriminalization" means.

/still a good first step
 
2014-04-08 08:49:41 AM  

pantojar: The real epidemic is the widespread confusion about what "decriminalization" means.

/still a good first step


it means that you don't go to jail, which ruins your life FAR more than the effects of smoking weed, the taxpayers of Maryland don't pay for who knows how much overtime for police processing of very petty drug charges, the courts clear up, and the 5-0 can move on to more meaningful work.  The $100 fine will be enough to keep people discreet.

It is indeed a good start.
 
2014-04-08 08:53:17 AM  

spiral_fishcake: But what about the prison industry? How are they going to find enough inmates to stay in business if you can't serve time for pot? THINK OF THE PRISONS!


They will be just fine. Somebody, somewhere is doing something worthy of incarceration.

I'm looking at you climate change deniers.
 
2014-04-08 08:54:59 AM  

Day_Old_Dutchie: The punishment would be stiffer for those younger: 18 to 20-year-olds would have to appear in court, where they could be ordered to undergo treatment. Juveniles would continue to be treated through the justice system.

Treatment?  For Pot "Addiction"?
This treatment is probably "torture".

Those old pampered, wealthy, privileged, white, wrinkled bald men that write these laws are living in an alternate reality - farkin' scared senile old coots.


What's with these laws that do not respect an ADULT?  Pretty sure Age is written clearly in the Anti-Discimination Act.  Over 18=Adult, there should be no classes of 'adult', you either are or you are not.
 
2014-04-08 08:57:10 AM  
California Governor Jerry Brown:  "How many people can get stoned and still have a great state or a great nation?"

I dont know, dumbass.  How many people can get roarding drunk and still have a great state or a great nation?

/Dumbass is dumb
 
2014-04-08 08:57:45 AM  

Hack Patooey: California Governor Jerry Brown:  "How many people can get stoned and still have a great state or a great nation?"

I dont know, dumbass.  How many people can get roarding  roaring drunk and still have a great state or a great nation?

/Dumbass is dumb


FTFM
 
2014-04-08 09:01:09 AM  
Yeah, it's just a ticket but you still lose the weed. That's the crux of the problem.

/current resident
 
2014-04-08 09:06:33 AM  

Iszael: Doesn't having 10 grams of marijuana on you mean that you bought it somewhere?

I assume they would still prosecute the suppliers.  So that makes this make less sense.  It's a crime to sell someone something that's not a crime for them to possess.

It just seems a bit weird.  I guess this is intended to be the thin edge of the wedge, today it's decriminalizing recreational quantities, tomorrow that might be expanded a bit, then it becomes hard to tell who a supplier is, etc.

Not like I really care, I don't use it and I don't live in Maryland.


It's not going to be a  crime to possess a small amount of marijuana, but it will still not be  legal.  This is the same concept as, say, negligent driving.  Driving negligently isn't  legal, but it won't put you in jail.  It'll just expose you to civil penalties (points on your license, fines, etc.).

As for dealers, that's a whole other ball game.

What's important to realize here is that this is a  massive resource win for prosecutors and police.  The smell of marijuana remains probable cause to search someone (or a car).  This means they'll still be able to discover dealers, large amounts, etc., but they won't have to criminally charge someone who turns out just to have had a small amount (10g should be around 5-10 'joints' worth).  Police can avoid a massive amount of paperwork.  Thousands of young men and women won't fear jail (or the associated job-hunt difficulties associated with criminal histories).  Prosecutors won't have to spend time on those cases.  The State and Counties will get an influx of money as these defendants pay the Courts instead of paying lawyers to come in and try to negotiate a non-jail deal.

Everyone wins here.  Except defense attorneys.

There are hundreds of defense attorneys around Maryland who have a massive practice of defending clients with small marijuana possession cases.  They charge a few hundred dollars and could essentially guarantee that they'd be able to negotiate a plea deal with the prosecutor for a probation before judgement or, at worst, a suspended sentence.  Now, there's no incentive to go get that lawyer.  Just mail in your check.  The amounts listed - $100 for first-timers, then $250 and $500 - are trivial compared to lawyer costs.  No one in their right mind will get a lawyer for that first one, that's for sure.

How many University of Maryland students will stay out of the Prince George's County court system now?

Huge.
 
2014-04-08 09:07:03 AM  

SmellsLikePoo: Seriously, are you living under a rock?  There are now two US states where it is 100% legal.


I get what you're saying, but even booze isn't "100% legal". Complete legality suggests to me that there are no restrictions on purchase or use whatsoever. Only thing I can think of that might fit that description is water, but there are definitely water laws in parts of the country.

If you can get in trouble for using it in public, it's not 100% legal.
 
2014-04-08 09:08:25 AM  
It's a step in the right direction.... but not nearly enough. Full legalization is what is needed.

Oh, and I'm glad O'Malley is going to sign this, but I still think he's a douche. The whole bit about us not wanting to be a "laboratory of democracy" didn't really change my opinion of him at all.
 
2014-04-08 09:14:46 AM  

fireclown: pantojar: The real epidemic is the widespread confusion about what "decriminalization" means.

/still a good first step

it means that you don't go to jail, which ruins your life FAR more than the effects of smoking weed, the taxpayers of Maryland don't pay for who knows how much overtime for police processing of very petty drug charges, the courts clear up, and the 5-0 can move on to more meaningful work.  The $100 fine will be enough to keep people discreet.

It is indeed a good start.


Oh yeah don't get me wrong, I think it's a great thing.  I just think a lot of my coworkers are picturing a situation where someone tries to sell them a "dimebag" every morning as they're coming out of the metro because they think decriminalization = legalized recreational use. You can probably throw my mother in with that group as well.
 
2014-04-08 09:17:34 AM  
Wow, that happened fast!

/in Baltimore
/welcome news
 
2014-04-08 09:18:14 AM  
Personally, I have no desire to smoke pot but I support decriminalization just because locking people up for possession is an incredible waste of money.  This law is a start but it is going to need a lot of work next year.  For example, they didn't change the laws about drug paraphernalia.  Even thought under existing law doesn't carry the possibility of jail time if convicted, it is still a criminal offense and you can be arrested. So if you get caught, the 10 grams of pot is cool, but if you have a pipe or rolling papers on you, you are still going to jail for the night.
 
2014-04-08 09:22:09 AM  

HK-MP5-SD: For example, they didn't change the laws about drug paraphernalia.  Even thought under existing law doesn't carry the possibility of jail time if convicted, it is still a criminal offense and you can be arrested.


No, that's not correct.

You cannot be arrested solely for a non-jailable offense, by definition.  If you just have paraphernalia in personal-use amounts (as opposed, say, to 500 baggies) you're not facing jail.

Paraphernalia is always charged by citation, anyway, unless you're being arrested and charged for other things (e.g. assault, disorderly conduct, etc.) regardless.

However, pragmatically, the paraphernalia law's "subsequent offender" aspect - which allows jail for people with two or more such convictions - will have to be changed.  Paraphernalia will likely have to be, in general, switched over at least for marijuana paraphernalia.

The practical upshot though is that no officer is going to bother jacking you up on paraphernalia simply because their superiors and the State's Attorney's office isn't going to cooperate with them.  No one  wants to waste their own time on something they find pointless.
 
2014-04-08 09:24:40 AM  
California Governor Jerry Brown:  "How many people can get stoned and still have a great state or a great nation?"

What happened Jerry Brown you used to be cool.
 
2014-04-08 09:28:18 AM  
All these states are dipping a toe in the water to test the temperature before making a commitment to change their stance. It's pure cowardice really, instead of having a resolute opinion and openly state that no one should be going to jail for these offenses or that health concerns are a trumped up initiative for drug policy, they choose to sit on the fence out of fear it may be detrimental to their political careers.

When they see public opinion firmly shift then they'll crawl out from under their rocks to attest to the rancid ethics of long standing drug policy, as if they always believed it. Albeit, this is the status quo in the the political environment, but that doesn't make it any less infuriating.
 
2014-04-08 09:28:53 AM  

spiral_fishcake: But what about the prison industry? How are they going to find enough inmates to stay in business if you can't serve time for pot? THINK OF THE PRISONS!


Considering there has been some problems keeping Baltimore prisons under control, I don't think we need to add to the population there.

On the plus side, maybe it will free up resources (and get some revenue) to address the heroin problem.
 
2014-04-08 09:31:24 AM  

Mose: There have been a lot of dumb laws passed in this country.  Prohibition of marijuana is right up there with the dumbest of them.  It blows my mind that anyone still defends it.


If we didn't enforce laws just because they're dumb, people wouldn't be firing three shots into the air before riding their horses inside the City Limits.

Check. Mate.
 
2014-04-08 09:43:20 AM  

brimed03: Mose: There have been a lot of dumb laws passed in this country.  Prohibition of marijuana is right up there with the dumbest of them.  It blows my mind that anyone still defends it.

If we didn't enforce laws just because they're dumb, people wouldn't be firing three shots into the air before riding their horses inside the City Limits.

Check. Mate.


Are you playing chess for the mentally challenged?

This is a truly asinine argument.
 
2014-04-08 09:47:46 AM  

Mose: There have been a lot of dumb laws passed in this country.  Prohibition of marijuana is right up there with the dumbest of them.  It blows my mind that anyone still defends it.



but but 'soft on crime'

but but 'pot makes people lazy'

but but 'people will smoke pot and drive'

but but 'it has to be illegal for a reason'

etc etc
 
2014-04-08 09:48:34 AM  

MythDragon: We really need D.C. to legalize it.  If we hit that bullseye, the rest of the dominoes should fall like a house of cards. Checkmate.


Sorry, they won't risk losing their monopoly on seizing people's property who get in trouble in a drug bust operation. At least not in this life.
 
2014-04-08 09:49:39 AM  

mongbiohazard: It's a step in the right direction.... but not nearly enough. Full legalization is what is needed.

Oh, and I'm glad O'Malley is going to sign this, but I still think he's a douche. The whole bit about us not wanting to be a "laboratory of democracy" didn't really change my opinion of him at all.


Agreed.  He's done some good for Maryland, but I won't be voting for him for President.
 
2014-04-08 10:06:40 AM  
Hmmm...No more asset forfeiture. No more dressing up and riding in a military-surplus APV. No more tossing flashbang grenades through windows and kicking in doors. No more storming into people's homes at 2AM, shooting their dog, and holding them at AR-15 gunpoint while gathering the "evidence" of a couple roaches in an ashtray.

Sounds horrible.

Won't somebody please think of the cops?

encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com
 
2014-04-08 10:24:43 AM  

gretzkyscores: Won't somebody please think of the cops?


They can move on to fight heroin and meth.  They'll be fine.  Plenty of tweekers out there, and they're actually dangerous.
 
Displayed 50 of 67 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report