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(Chicago Trib)   2008: Starbucks commits to recycling program at all of its stores by 2015. - 2014: Starbucks dropping recycling program because customers refuse to recycle   (chicagotribune.com ) divider line
    More: Strange, Starbucks, Georgia-Pacific, recycling, pilot experiments, refuses, profit motive, customers  
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790 clicks; posted to Business » on 08 Apr 2014 at 7:20 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



31 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-04-08 12:47:09 AM  
Something, something... stupid hippies... something, too busy leaching wifi to care about environment... something like that.

/something, something...
 
2014-04-08 06:52:08 AM  

strangeluck: Something, something... stupid hippies... something, too busy leaching wifi to care about environment... something like that.

/something, something...


Is it actually hippies that make up the largest Starbucks demographic?
 
2014-04-08 07:26:01 AM  
The recycling rate in NYC is very low. People talk it, but they don't walk it.
 
2014-04-08 07:29:05 AM  
The obvious tag hasn't had its latte yet today.
 
2014-04-08 07:33:01 AM  
Based on the article, it seems like the problem isn't that customers refuse to recycle; it's that they don't throw enough paper Starbucks cups away to make it worth the recycler's time to process them.
 
2014-04-08 07:37:38 AM  

Delta1212: Based on the article, it seems like the problem isn't that customers refuse to recycle; it's that they don't throw enough paper Starbucks cups away to make it worth the recycler's time to process them.


Most likely because the majority of people get their coffee and walk out the door.
 
2014-04-08 08:22:46 AM  

Frederick: strangeluck: Something, something... stupid hippies... something, too busy leaching wifi to care about environment... something like that.

/something, something...

Is it actually hippies that make up the largest Starbucks demographic?


Yuppies and hipsters.  Actual hippies are probably to broke to afford Starbucks.
 
2014-04-08 08:24:06 AM  
Duh.  Recycling = Communism.  Any fool know dat.
 
2014-04-08 08:32:49 AM  
"just because something can be recycled doesn't mean it can be recycled economically"

That's the issue with most recycling. A big part of that is having a place nearby to use the recycled material. You can collect all the plastic bottles you want to, if there's not a factory nearby to use them it's pointless. It's simply not cost effective to ship the material long distances.

To be honest I thought the issue was going to be the fact that the used cups have coffee, milk, whip cream etc. residue on them. Typically if something has any kind of food contamination on it, it's not recyclable.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-04-08 08:34:04 AM  
Just burn them. Those three tons of cups are a little less than three tons of carbon, worth in the neighborhood of $100 by standard carbon tax proposals. Levy a mil per cup carbon tax to make customers feel guilty. (A study claims guilting B.C. drivers with a carbon tax did cut gas consumption more than just raising prices, but I don't believe the analysis.)
 
2014-04-08 08:50:04 AM  

ReapTheChaos: "just because something can be recycled doesn't mean it can be recycled economically"

That's the issue with most recycling. A big part of that is having a place nearby to use the recycled material. You can collect all the plastic bottles you want to, if there's not a factory nearby to use them it's pointless. It's simply not cost effective to ship the material long distances.

To be honest I thought the issue was going to be the fact that the used cups have coffee, milk, whip cream etc. residue on them. Typically if something has any kind of food contamination on it, it's not recyclable.


 And thats the problem. Most people don't mind recycling. Its having to wash and scrub each damn container before you put it in the recycler. Easier to just toss it in the trash.

Come to think of it, this still puzzles me. Isn't most of this stuff melted down? Shouldn't all the residue just burn off?
 
2014-04-08 09:05:09 AM  

Frederick: strangeluck: Something, something... stupid hippies... something, too busy leaching wifi to care about environment... something like that.

/something, something...

Is it actually hippies that make up the largest Starbucks demographic?


I would go with women 18-35 with too much credit card debt.
 
2014-04-08 10:01:15 AM  
I am looking forward to all the links to some wizards on HBO debunking recycling.
 
2014-04-08 10:59:58 AM  

Old enough to know better: ReapTheChaos: "just because something can be recycled doesn't mean it can be recycled economically"

That's the issue with most recycling. A big part of that is having a place nearby to use the recycled material. You can collect all the plastic bottles you want to, if there's not a factory nearby to use them it's pointless. It's simply not cost effective to ship the material long distances.

To be honest I thought the issue was going to be the fact that the used cups have coffee, milk, whip cream etc. residue on them. Typically if something has any kind of food contamination on it, it's not recyclable.

 And thats the problem. Most people don't mind recycling. Its having to wash and scrub each damn container before you put it in the recycler. Easier to just toss it in the trash.

Come to think of it, this still puzzles me. Isn't most of this stuff melted down? Shouldn't all the residue just burn off?


My city's recycling program specifically states that you don't have to wash stuff.
 
2014-04-08 11:21:05 AM  

BizarreMan: Delta1212: Based on the article, it seems like the problem isn't that customers refuse to recycle; it's that they don't throw enough paper Starbucks cups away to make it worth the recycler's time to process them.

Most likely because the majority of people get their coffee and walk out the door.


And then throw their empty cups away next to the overflowing garbage and recycling bins in the city.
 
2014-04-08 11:26:55 AM  

Old enough to know better: ReapTheChaos: "just because something can be recycled doesn't mean it can be recycled economically"

That's the issue with most recycling. A big part of that is having a place nearby to use the recycled material. You can collect all the plastic bottles you want to, if there's not a factory nearby to use them it's pointless. It's simply not cost effective to ship the material long distances.

To be honest I thought the issue was going to be the fact that the used cups have coffee, milk, whip cream etc. residue on them. Typically if something has any kind of food contamination on it, it's not recyclable.

 And thats the problem. Most people don't mind recycling. Its having to wash and scrub each damn container before you put it in the recycler. Easier to just toss it in the trash.

Come to think of it, this still puzzles me. Isn't most of this stuff melted down? Shouldn't all the residue just burn off?


I think for paper it is not worth it for most places, plastic and metal though, it is worth it for them to wash it beforehand.
 
2014-04-08 11:59:14 AM  
In other news, a so-called "progressive" company like Starbucks is buying its cups from a Koch Industries subsidiary.
 
2014-04-08 12:06:50 PM  
Just put out different bins, and then throw all manner of garbage in all of them.

That way, you can APPEAR to care, which is all that matters to libtards.
 
2014-04-08 12:11:39 PM  
It's the same problem with recycling laptop batteries, not much total weight and expensive to collect. That might change when hybrid/electric car batteries start hitting EOL. Those are large enough to be worth processing and will have limited collection sites (aka wreckers), making the inflow simple.
 
2014-04-08 12:16:03 PM  

Frederick: strangeluck: Something, something... stupid hippies... something, too busy leaching wifi to care about environment... something like that.

/something, something...

Is it actually hippies that make up the largest Starbucks demographic?


No;  people who don't like, you know, actual coffee unless it has a hoard of sugar and cream and don't care about the cost.... or conformists:

img.fark.net
 
2014-04-08 12:50:29 PM  
Yeah, the Starbucks cares about the environment campaign loses a lot of steam when you see the constant line of 12 suvs and minivans idling at their drive thrus
 
2014-04-08 01:44:15 PM  
Liberals only want others to sacrifice? Hence why so many Day After Tomorrowers still use computers for recreation.
 
2014-04-08 03:11:44 PM  

Old enough to know better: ReapTheChaos: "just because something can be recycled doesn't mean it can be recycled economically"

That's the issue with most recycling. A big part of that is having a place nearby to use the recycled material. You can collect all the plastic bottles you want to, if there's not a factory nearby to use them it's pointless. It's simply not cost effective to ship the material long distances.

To be honest I thought the issue was going to be the fact that the used cups have coffee, milk, whip cream etc. residue on them. Typically if something has any kind of food contamination on it, it's not recyclable.

 And thats the problem. Most people don't mind recycling. Its having to wash and scrub each damn container before you put it in the recycler. Easier to just toss it in the trash.

Come to think of it, this still puzzles me. Isn't most of this stuff melted down? Shouldn't all the residue just burn off?


Glass and metal are remelted, but contrary to popular belief plastic can't be simply melted down and made into new plastic. It's typically ground into a powder and used as a filler or binding agent in other materials.

As for paper, it's ground back into a fibrous slurry and mixed with fresh fibers to make into more paper, any food residue would contaminate the batch.
 
2014-04-08 03:41:51 PM  
don't most people leave 4bucks with the container? I don't think i've ever stayed there to drink a cup of coffee, i always go in, get what i want and leave.
 
2014-04-08 05:04:41 PM  

Russ1642: My city's recycling program specifically states that you don't have to wash stuff.


And mine requires corrugated cardboard to be recycled (you can be fined for throwing it out), but exempts really greasy corrugated cardboard like pizza boxes.
 
2014-04-08 06:02:19 PM  

ReapTheChaos: It's simply not cost effective to ship the material long distances.


I'm in Alaska.  It actually saves the planet more to deliver all the paper/plastics to the local coal plant for incineration and conversion into electricity than to try to deliver the stuff to a recycling plant - it'd use more oil to get the products to a recycling plant than it would be to use said oil to make fresh product.

ReapTheChaos: but contrary to popular belief plastic can't be simply melted down and made into new plastic.


it depends on the plastic type, which is why you have the little three arrow insignias with a 1-3 in it.
 
2014-04-08 06:38:08 PM  
People who will pay 7 bucks for a coffee are dumb and can't follow instructions? You don't say.
 
2014-04-08 07:20:04 PM  
Meh... I'm guilty too.  I actually go through the trouble of separating my aluminum, but half the time when I get to the dump, I just throw it all in the same dumpster anyhow.

/Partially because I'm bitter about just handing what is essentially free money over to some company
 
2014-04-08 10:10:25 PM  
Recycling in a public business that specializes in food (and generates plastic/metal/paper/foam food waste) never works.
I worked in a large, fancy grocery store with a cafe' section, very briefly, as a janitor. Despite having separate, clearly labeled containers for Glass, plastic, and cans (and paper in other areas of the store), people clearly can't read or recognize what they are about to throw out is trash, or recyclable. I found styrofoam containers jammed in the 'plastic' cans, random chicken bones and other crap dumped in the 'glass' bins, etc.
A recycling processing company is not going to process stuff that is contaminated with. Although we actually did have a separate pick up bin for recycling (unlike some places, which just dump everything in the trash anyway), I highly doubt that any of that stuff ever picked up was ever properly recycled and not tossed out just with the sheer nastiness of it all.

And with Starbucks, I imagine most of their business is 'take out'. Are people supposed to come back with a stack of dirty coffee cups and throw them in the bin?
 
2014-04-09 01:12:24 AM  

hinten: I am looking forward to all the links to some wizards on HBO debunking recycling.


Been a while since I have seen that, but I have always agreed with it.  Of course we should consider recycling when it makes sense, but all the economic and quality of life issues need to be considered.  Kind of how I feel about climate change.  I know, what if we created a better world for nothing, yada yada yada, but things are complicated.

Where I live we have single container recycling and my family participates because it is easy.  Hope it pays for itself.
 
2014-04-09 11:56:41 AM  
Around here, many places compost their waste. Even plastic and paper cups are compostable, if you get the right ones.
 
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