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(WLKY Louisville)   If you climb atop a building, break a skylight and drop a ladder into a residence before falling and breaking your leg, pleading not guilty to burglary seems a bit of a stretch, doesn't it?   (wlky.com ) divider line
    More: Dumbass, burglary, West Main Street, pleading  
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2297 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Apr 2014 at 3:34 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



35 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-04-07 03:35:23 PM  
He took the splunge.
 
2014-04-07 03:36:16 PM  
He was framed
 
2014-04-07 03:37:21 PM  
Because at that point all he did was breaking and entering, he didn't actually get the chance to burgle. At least that would be my guess. IANAL.
 
2014-04-07 03:37:39 PM  
Should have ordered COX cable
 
2014-04-07 03:37:40 PM  

HotWingConspiracy: He took the splunge.


Clicks on the link........

fc04.deviantart.net

/OK,...Thread over......hit the lights.......*slams the door on the way out*
 
2014-04-07 03:38:39 PM  
so how long before he sues the owner?
 
2014-04-07 03:40:34 PM  
Not very good at parkour is he?
 
2014-04-07 03:41:32 PM  
There used to be some lesbians who lived across the parkway from me. They seemed pretty cool, except one day they saw me watching them through binoculars and then they shut the curtains and never opened them up again. It occurred to me to break in and hide in the closet or something so I could watch them. But I knew they would take that the wrong way. If I got caught, they would accuse me of something worse than what I was doing. So what I'm trying to say here is, maybe this guy wasn't trying to rob anyone, but he just doesn't think things through as carefully as I do.
 
2014-04-07 03:41:40 PM  
"Urban spelunking"
 
2014-04-07 03:42:30 PM  

kattana: so how long before he sues the owner?


This.
 
2014-04-07 03:43:26 PM  
 
2014-04-07 03:45:35 PM  
www.hollywoodreporter.com
 
2014-04-07 03:48:48 PM  

neongoats: Because at that point all he did was breaking and entering, he didn't actually get the chance to burgle. At least that would be my guess. IANAL.


Also my thinking.  Plead guilty to B&E, in exchange for the prosecution not pursuing the (presumably harder to prove) burglary charge.  But, IA also NAL.
 
2014-04-07 03:53:48 PM  
Not guilty eh? I don't think he has a leg to stand on. Maybe he'll see the light after this incident and mend his ways. You never know, this could be a step in the right direction for him. He'll pick up the broken pieces of his life and move on. Course he'll have to start from the bottom rung of the ladder and work his way up.
 
2014-04-07 03:56:21 PM  
Would've gotten him ten.
 
2014-04-07 03:57:47 PM  

Captain James T. Smirk: Would've gotten him ten.


That was supposed to be a picture of Jim Carrey from  Liar Liar.It was there in the previewed post. Lame.
 
2014-04-07 04:05:48 PM  
Wasn't burglarizing. Was practicing his skylight repair hobby.
 
2014-04-07 04:08:03 PM  
"Did he say 'splunge'"?
 
2014-04-07 04:10:11 PM  
Splunge is slightly better than Clunge. But not by much.
 
2014-04-07 04:11:12 PM  
www.emilykatehargrove.com
 
2014-04-07 04:15:23 PM  

neongoats: he didn't actually get the chance to burgle


The prosecution would just need to prove intent to steal  (or commit some other crime)

E.g. from Oregon

" a person commits the crime of burglary in the second degree if the person enters or remains unlawfully in a building with intent to commit a crime therein. "

<http://www.oregonlaws.org/ors/164.215 >
 
2014-04-07 04:19:26 PM  
 
2014-04-07 04:20:03 PM  
24.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-04-07 04:40:09 PM  

HMS_Blinkin: neongoats: Because at that point all he did was breaking and entering, he didn't actually get the chance to burgle. At least that would be my guess. IANAL.

Also my thinking.  Plead guilty to B&E, in exchange for the prosecution not pursuing the (presumably harder to prove) burglary charge.  But, IA also NAL.


Burglary is breaking and entry with intent to commit a felony. If he broke in intending to steal, that's burglary, even if he broke his leg on the way in and didn't get to finish it.
 
2014-04-07 04:48:38 PM  
About 20ish years ago, my mom's boss was sued by a burglar who fell through her skylight and injured himself. The burglar recieved about 50k from the homeowners insurance. More than he would have recieved fencing her kachina doll collection.
 
2014-04-07 05:11:18 PM  

MyRandomName: About 20ish years ago, my mom's boss was sued by a burglar who fell through her skylight and injured himself. The burglar recieved about 50k from the homeowners insurance. More than he would have recieved fencing her kachina doll collection.


Honestly...I'm not doubting your Mom, but it's a 3rd- or 4th- person story.  Do you really think this happened?
 
2014-04-07 05:49:34 PM  
Reminds me of the lawyer who plead his client out...and got him the death penalty. You're doing it wrong.
 
2014-04-07 05:51:57 PM  
Burglary is trespass with intent to commit a felony or any level of theft.
 
2014-04-07 05:52:28 PM  

Curry and beer: neongoats: he didn't actually get the chance to burgle

The prosecution would just need to prove intent to steal  (or commit some other crime)

E.g. from Oregon

" a person commits the crime of burglary in the second degree if the person enters or remains unlawfully in a building with intent to commit a crime therein. "

<http://www.oregonlaws.org/ors/164.215 >


So now intent matters again? So when somebody gets prosecuted as a hacker for violating a websites TOS then intent doesn't matter just the letter of the law but now that a guy didn successfully steal anything well now intent matters again. We as a society really need to make up our minds. Which is more important. Intent of a law or the letter of the law
 
2014-04-07 05:57:29 PM  

MyRandomName: About 20ish years ago, my mom's boss was sued by a burglar who fell through her skylight and injured himself. The burglar recieved about 50k from the homeowners insurance. More than he would have recieved fencing her kachina doll collection.


farm9.staticflickr.com
 
2014-04-07 06:25:14 PM  

Gyrfalcon: HMS_Blinkin: neongoats: Because at that point all he did was breaking and entering, he didn't actually get the chance to burgle. At least that would be my guess. IANAL.

Also my thinking.  Plead guilty to B&E, in exchange for the prosecution not pursuing the (presumably harder to prove) burglary charge.  But, IA also NAL.

Burglary is breaking and entry with intent to commit a felony. If he broke in intending to steal, that's burglary, even if he broke his leg on the way in and didn't get to finish it.


Unless he had a big loot bag with a $ sign on the side, and a note saying "Things to steal: ...", how would anyone prove his intent?
 
2014-04-07 07:12:08 PM  

vicejay: MyRandomName: About 20ish years ago, my mom's boss was sued by a burglar who fell through her skylight and injured himself. The burglar recieved about 50k from the homeowners insurance. More than he would have recieved fencing her kachina doll collection.

Honestly...I'm not doubting your Mom, but it's a 3rd- or 4th- person story.  Do you really think this happened?


Yes. I was at the company party when the boss told the story. It was also used as an example when trying to pass liability protection laws to protect homeowners. You think this story is unique?
 
2014-04-07 07:19:44 PM  

Perducci: Gyrfalcon: HMS_Blinkin: neongoats: Because at that point all he did was breaking and entering, he didn't actually get the chance to burgle. At least that would be my guess. IANAL.

Also my thinking.  Plead guilty to B&E, in exchange for the prosecution not pursuing the (presumably harder to prove) burglary charge.  But, IA also NAL.

Burglary is breaking and entry with intent to commit a felony. If he broke in intending to steal, that's burglary, even if he broke his leg on the way in and didn't get to finish it.

Unless he had a big loot bag with a $ sign on the side, and a note saying "Things to steal: ...", how would anyone prove his intent?


I for one would love to hear his explanation for why he climbed up a building in the middle of the night, broke a skylight of an apartment that wasn't his and lowered a ladder down into it so he could make entry, if his intent WASN'T to steal. All the prosecution has to do to prove their case is those facts--if he has a good rebuttal, that's on him. What other reason does one have to do these things BESIDES stealing?
 
2014-04-07 08:23:51 PM  

vicejay: MyRandomName: About 20ish years ago, my mom's boss was sued by a burglar who fell through her skylight and injured himself. The burglar recieved about 50k from the homeowners insurance. More than he would have recieved fencing her kachina doll collection.

Honestly...I'm not doubting your Mom, but it's a 3rd- or 4th- person story.  Do you really think this happened?


Yeah, that urban legend has been around for at least 30 years.
 
2014-04-08 08:48:22 AM  
of course he didn't plead guilty
one has quite limited choices of pleas from which to choose
a guilty plea automatically admits guilt to any and all charges, and you're accordingly sentenced
a not guilty plea gives you the chance to lessen the charges
but i'm sure subby already knew that
 
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