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(Slate)   A skydiver was almost hit by a meteorite? Yeah, about that... maybe not so much   (slate.com) divider line 45
    More: Followup, Meteorite, parachute, photomontages, terminal velocity, Death from the Skies, meteors, Philip C. Plait, Bad Astronomy  
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5385 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Apr 2014 at 3:20 PM (21 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



45 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-04-07 01:57:51 PM
Well written, and it leaves the door open while explaining the possibilities, as well as leaning to what seems most likely. I like it.
 
2014-04-07 02:29:36 PM
Trust but verify.
 
2014-04-07 02:36:51 PM
Did the guy pack his chute in a field?

/packer using rocks for weights and missed one?
//I suppose it could happen, but I don't know...
 
2014-04-07 02:46:04 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Did the guy pack his chute in a field?

/packer using rocks for weights and missed one?
//I suppose it could happen, but I don't know...


But if it's a pebble....

If you look at the collage there are no frames where it is farther away from the chute. I'll see if I can track down the source video and try to make a better one.


try.....
 
2014-04-07 03:25:30 PM
The author had to write something, so why not an entire article on a mystery rock while positing an utterly ludicrous viewpoint?

Skydivers do not pack rocks in their parachutes.
 
2014-04-07 03:29:28 PM
That was such an in depth analysis, and part of a wide amount of in depth analyses from experts and "experts" all over the internet... and it's just a video of a rock. Even if it is a meteoroid it's interesting for 5 seconds. If he was killed by a meteoroid then it'd be interesting for 10 seconds. If it's a rock in his bag put there by a love-rival to try to kill him then it's interesting for 3 seconds to 6 seconds depending on the sexiness of the woman they're rivals over. Either way, it's not a grand event like the Russian one.

So if a meteoroid is before it hits, and a meteorite is after it hits, what's a meteor?
 
2014-04-07 03:34:54 PM

Slaxl: That was such an in depth analysis, and part of a wide amount of in depth analyses from experts and "experts" all over the internet... and it's just a video of a rock. Even if it is a meteoroid it's interesting for 5 seconds. If he was killed by a meteoroid then it'd be interesting for 10 seconds. If it's a rock in his bag put there by a love-rival to try to kill him then it's interesting for 3 seconds to 6 seconds depending on the sexiness of the woman they're rivals over. Either way, it's not a grand event like the Russian one.

So if a meteoroid is before it hits, and a meteorite is after it hits, what's a meteor?


About 39.3 inches
 
2014-04-07 03:35:16 PM

Slaxl: That was such an in depth analysis, and part of a wide amount of in depth analyses from experts and "experts" all over the internet... and it's just a video of a rock. Even if it is a meteoroid it's interesting for 5 seconds. If he was killed by a meteoroid then it'd be interesting for 10 seconds. If it's a rock in his bag put there by a love-rival to try to kill him then it's interesting for 3 seconds to 6 seconds depending on the sexiness of the woman they're rivals over. Either way, it's not a grand event like the Russian one.

So if a meteoroid is before it hits, and a meteorite is after it hits, what's a meteor?


Meteoroid is when it is space; meteor when it hits the atmosphere; meteorite when it hits the planet.
 
2014-04-07 03:36:04 PM
Could this rock/pebble come from the floor of a plane and off of someone's shoe; someone behind this diver?

In the 'chute? No.  I'd think that gravity would have made this fall faster and past the 'diver and not suddenly slow down.  Not saying it couldn't happen but I have a hard time thinking a 'diver would carelessly pack this FOD into his 'chute carelessly.
 
2014-04-07 03:42:00 PM

DivorceWar Veteran: Could this rock/pebble come from the floor of a plane and off of someone's shoe; someone behind this diver?

In the 'chute? No.  I'd think that gravity would have made this fall faster and past the 'diver and not suddenly slow down.  Not saying it couldn't happen but I have a hard time thinking a 'diver would carelessly pack this FOD into his 'chute carelessly.


Ding ding... and a very small pebble at that. There was too little contextual information to measure the size, but that object isn't something that came from outer space - it looks to be weather-worn, not burned up from re-entry. A pebble kicked out a second after he jumped out, and after deploying the chute, it falls past him. Q.E.D.

As for "he wouldn't pack a rock in his chute" - why couldn't it be a pebble that got pinched in a seam as he gathered it up of the ground in his last jump? As a rock moving at terminal velocity, it is very small, more of a pebble than a rock - easy to miss when folding your parachute.
 
2014-04-07 03:56:57 PM
Smells like BS to me.
Pack a rock into your chute?  For the lulz?  Sounds like a great way to get knocked the fark out and not experience the last 45 seconds of your life.

That said, I've heard of the 101st Airborne doing this.  Something about it being more intimidating that Wagner blaring over the speakers.
Due to the fact you might knock out of your buddies it is now a serious breach of regulations.  The more creative members of the elite group will sometimes replace the rocks with explosive-tipped Jarts (lawn darts) to which whistles have been affixed.  This change in tactics was inspired by the panic of Londoners when the whistle of buzz-bombs was heard.
The explosive tips?  The reasoning there pretty much speaks for itself.


/I'm no spentmiles
 
2014-04-07 04:00:31 PM

LesserEvil: DivorceWar Veteran: Could this rock/pebble come from the floor of a plane and off of someone's shoe; someone behind this diver?

In the 'chute? No.  I'd think that gravity would have made this fall faster and past the 'diver and not suddenly slow down.  Not saying it couldn't happen but I have a hard time thinking a 'diver would carelessly pack this FOD into his 'chute carelessly.

Ding ding... and a very small pebble at that. There was too little contextual information to measure the size, but that object isn't something that came from outer space - it looks to be weather-worn, not burned up from re-entry. A pebble kicked out a second after he jumped out, and after deploying the chute, it falls past him. Q.E.D.


Thinking through this, even after I posted; the "bounce" you'd have at the initial opening wouldn't give it the velocity (and it's hard to tell from the video the distance, size and speed - sorry, just is because there isn't any reference point when you see nothing but sky and nothing of known size dropping from a perfectly good airplane either).  If it was packed into the 'chute, it's hard to say what direction it would go but the speed wouldn't be fast.

As for "he wouldn't pack a rock in his chute" - why couldn't it be a pebble that got pinched in a seam as he gathered it up of the ground in his last jump? As a rock moving at terminal velocity, it is very small, more of a pebble than a rock - easy to miss when folding your parachute.


When I did my measly three jumps for sport jumping (and then nature said to stay on the ground), it was ingrained in you to look at your folds and to pack your chute exactly as you were taught.  The instructors are just too careful and that carries with you. Could it happen with careless packing? Sure but how likely is it?
 
2014-04-07 04:07:09 PM
In the original video I saw there was mention of another skydiver above him. I think you saw a flash of him in the beginning.
 
2014-04-07 04:11:50 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Slaxl: That was such an in depth analysis, and part of a wide amount of in depth analyses from experts and "experts" all over the internet... and it's just a video of a rock. Even if it is a meteoroid it's interesting for 5 seconds. If he was killed by a meteoroid then it'd be interesting for 10 seconds. If it's a rock in his bag put there by a love-rival to try to kill him then it's interesting for 3 seconds to 6 seconds depending on the sexiness of the woman they're rivals over. Either way, it's not a grand event like the Russian one.

So if a meteoroid is before it hits, and a meteorite is after it hits, what's a meteor?

About 39.3 inches


I was told there would be no mass
 
2014-04-07 04:24:30 PM
Rock fell out of the jump plane.
Or the parachute.
Grabass in the packing barn, whoops.

Bank it, done.
 
2014-04-07 04:39:24 PM
still working on it.....

The first frame it appears in it's at the level of the chute. and it lasts for 5 frames at 25 fps. Wish I had the 60fps footage

It is a pretty small object, more of a pebble than a rock.
 
2014-04-07 04:40:24 PM
UR BLOG ROCK
 
2014-04-07 04:47:40 PM
If it's a meteor, we have a tiny little search area. Well, relatively little.
 
2014-04-07 05:04:49 PM
It could be carried by an African swallow.
 
2014-04-07 05:06:53 PM
Everything on the internet is fake. Just look at that northern lights bullshiat. Obviously can't be real.
 
2014-04-07 05:12:35 PM

Clock Spider Jerusalem: Everything on the internet is fake. Just look at that northern lights bullshiat. Obviously can't be real.


This entire thread is clearly fake - it's probably just one guy (I mean, besides me - I might be real) drunk off his ass in the fark.com Inc. main office.
 
2014-04-07 05:13:03 PM

HighZoolander: Clock Spider Jerusalem: Everything on the internet is fake. Just look at that northern lights bullshiat. Obviously can't be real.

This entire thread is clearly fake - it's probably just one guy (I mean, besides me - I might be real) drunk off his ass in the fark.com Inc. main office.


This is all a dream sequence anyway.
 
2014-04-07 05:16:32 PM
I want to bereave.

- Really, I thought it was so groovy that I suspended all disbelief.
 
2014-04-07 05:23:03 PM
But bear in mind that meteoroids big enough to see are extremely rare, and are so uncommon that none-not one-has ever been positively caught on video, despite all the cameras we use all the time. That means this object is even more unlikely to be one, since it also fell very close to the camera (and coincidentally right after the parachute opened). That's a whole lot of unlikely events happening in a row, which triggered my skeptical sense right away but makes it tingle even more strongly now.

I have a problem with this line of reasoning though... "We've never seen one before, so we probably didn't see one here...". Sorry, but eventually a camera will catch one. Not that I am going to decide one way or the other on this, I have too much of a dual nature, but this is kind of like the "If aliens exist, why haven't we SEEN one yet?" question.
 
2014-04-07 05:27:37 PM
The "meteorite" is moving to slow. FAKE rock
 
2014-04-07 06:16:47 PM

Mark Ratner: The "meteorite" is moving to slow. FAKE rock


"to" slow for what? As compared to what?
 
2014-04-07 06:23:04 PM

100 Watt Walrus: Mark Ratner: The "meteorite" is moving to slow. FAKE rock

"to" slow for what? As compared to what?


yeah yeah, I noticed that too, and its a pet peeve. I'm a loser
 
2014-04-07 06:27:51 PM

Mark Ratner: 100 Watt Walrus: Mark Ratner: The "meteorite" is moving to slow. FAKE rock

"to" slow for what? As compared to what?

yeah yeah, I noticed that too, and its a pet peeve. I'm a loser


My question remains though. Too slow for what? As compared to what?
 
2014-04-07 06:33:32 PM

Mark Ratner: 100 Watt Walrus: Mark Ratner: The "meteorite" is moving to slow. FAKE rock

"to" slow for what? As compared to what?

yeah yeah, I noticed that too, and its a pet peeve. I'm a loser looser



/pet peave
 
2014-04-07 06:36:12 PM

100 Watt Walrus: Mark Ratner: 100 Watt Walrus: Mark Ratner: The "meteorite" is moving to slow. FAKE rock

"to" slow for what? As compared to what?

yeah yeah, I noticed that too, and its a pet peeve. I'm a loser

My question remains though. Too slow for what? As compared to what?


I would think it would be traveling much faster, like the footage we've seen of that Russian meteorite that rattled windows and caused a sonic boom. It's like someone just dropped a rock from the plane, but I'm no scientist.
 
2014-04-07 06:39:52 PM

Mark Ratner: 100 Watt Walrus: Mark Ratner: 100 Watt Walrus: Mark Ratner: The "meteorite" is moving to slow. FAKE rock

"to" slow for what? As compared to what?

yeah yeah, I noticed that too, and its a pet peeve. I'm a loser

My question remains though. Too slow for what? As compared to what?

I would think it would be traveling much faster, like the footage we've seen of that Russian meteorite that rattled windows and caused a sonic boom. It's like someone just dropped a rock from the plane, but I'm no scientist.



Depending on the angle of attack and whether or not it was apiece of another larger meteor that impacted the atmosphere and shattered could affect the speed as well.  What we see there could be a chuck of a busted meteor that has slowed to its terminal velocity.
 
2014-04-07 06:51:53 PM

BafflerMeal: Mark Ratner: 100 Watt Walrus: Mark Ratner: 100 Watt Walrus: Mark Ratner: The "meteorite" is moving to slow. FAKE rock

"to" slow for what? As compared to what?

yeah yeah, I noticed that too, and its a pet peeve. I'm a loser

My question remains though. Too slow for what? As compared to what?

I would think it would be traveling much faster, like the footage we've seen of that Russian meteorite that rattled windows and caused a sonic boom. It's like someone just dropped a rock from the plane, but I'm no scientist.


Depending on the angle of attack and whether or not it was apiece of another larger meteor that impacted the atmosphere and shattered could affect the speed as well.  What we see there could be a chuck of a busted meteor that has slowed to its terminal velocity.


so, what do you think? That it was a meteorite? I want to believe it, too. That would be cool.
 
2014-04-07 06:53:32 PM

BafflerMeal: Mark Ratner: 100 Watt Walrus: Mark Ratner: 100 Watt Walrus: Mark Ratner: The "meteorite" is moving to slow. FAKE rock

"to" slow for what? As compared to what?

yeah yeah, I noticed that too, and its a pet peeve. I'm a loser

My question remains though. Too slow for what? As compared to what?

I would think it would be traveling much faster, like the footage we've seen of that Russian meteorite that rattled windows and caused a sonic boom. It's like someone just dropped a rock from the plane, but I'm no scientist.


Depending on the angle of attack and whether or not it was apiece of another larger meteor that impacted the atmosphere and shattered could affect the speed as well.  What we see there could be a chuck of a busted meteor that has slowed to its terminal velocity.


Which is what seems to be the prevailing theory on this particular rock, based on the knowledge of those shown in the video. Although unless it's found, there will never be any way of knowing for sure.
 
2014-04-07 07:07:48 PM

100 Watt Walrus: Mark Ratner: 100 Watt Walrus: Mark Ratner: The "meteorite" is moving to slow. FAKE rock

"to" slow for what? As compared to what?

yeah yeah, I noticed that too, and its a pet peeve. I'm a loser

My question remains though. Too slow for what? As compared to what?


compared to the terminal velocity of something striking the atmosphere.

Think passing on the highway.

There is a large amount of lens distortion that creates several optical illusions.

Think "objects in mirror are larger than they appear" when looking at it when it comes into view.

here it is with some of the lens distortion removed and slowed dow. if I can find the 60fps source it'd be more helpful and look better

http://youtu.be/XdRKujpqjjA

I just thought of a way to figure out the velocity, but like I said before, it's 5 frames at 25 fps, so it moved, what...20 feet in 1/20 of a second...so 100 feet per second is......what...68 mph?

That's slower than the termial velocity of a sky diver in free fall. So it's likely that it has't reached terminal velocity yet because it fell from a shoe or chute or something.

Just how big do you honestly thing this is?
 
2014-04-07 07:10:17 PM

BafflerMeal: Depending on the angle of attack and whether or not it was apiece of another larger meteor that impacted the atmosphere and shattered could affect the speed as well. What we see there could be a chuck of a busted meteor that has slowed to its terminal velocity.


Then someone on the ground would have reported a visual sighting or would have heard it. It took like a year and a half for this guy to figure out what happened. This was from the rear facing camera btw, so it did happen behind his back.
 
2014-04-07 07:15:40 PM
It's fake, I can tell by the pixels. Now I have to go write a meandering story about how I was wrong, but right, but maybe not either only sometimes and so were others.
 
2014-04-07 07:47:36 PM

cretinbob: Just how big do you honestly thing this is?


No idea. I'm not arguing that the rock is a meteor. I was just seeking clarification from Mark Ratner what he meant by "too slow," which struck me as an arbitrary assertion.

Your altered video does make a decent argument against it being a meteor.

cretinbob: BafflerMeal: Depending on the angle of attack and whether or not it was apiece of another larger meteor that impacted the atmosphere and shattered could affect the speed as well. What we see there could be a chuck of a busted meteor that has slowed to its terminal velocity.

Then someone on the ground would have reported a visual sighting or would have heard it. It took like a year and a half for this guy to figure out what happened. This was from the rear facing camera btw, so it did happen behind his back.


This argument, however, is pretty weak. "Someone on the ground would have reported a visual siting or would have heard it"? I'm sure you realize Earth's atmosphere is hit by dozens meteors every day, and almost all of them go unnoticed. Many are little more than dust or pebbles, but even assuming this rock is fist-sized (which it may not be), and that it's a chunk of something bigger (which is may not be), it doesn't automatically follow that the bigger rock couldn't have gone unnoticed.

A bigger meteor could have struck the atmosphere over an unpopulated area before shattering. It could have broken up while skipping off the atmosphere and just a few (or even one) pieces fell inwards (although in that case, this rock would likely have been scorched on all sides).
 
2014-04-07 08:35:05 PM
WTF you tards? This thing has all the authenticity of the farking Killian Memo.

In other news, Tard Astronomer leans towards it being real? That sounds about right - that dude is wrong more than Aristotle.
 
2014-04-07 09:28:56 PM

SevenizGud: WTF you tards? This thing has all the authenticity of the farking Killian Memo.

In other news, Tard Astronomer leans towards it being real? That sounds about right - that dude is wrong more than Aristotle.


Well, that settles it then. Why couldn't you have showed up in the first few posts and saved us all the trouble?
 
2014-04-07 10:49:14 PM
It's too slow to be a meteor.
 
2014-04-08 12:35:10 AM
It's a meteor.  It's moving slowly now because it impacted Flight 370 in a space/time rip.  Destroyed the plane then reappeared near this skydiver with most of its energy spent.  It's the only rational explanation.  Rocks already on Earth are bound by gravity and can't possibly get into the sky like this.  Only the smallest of them float in water and none of them are small enough to float in air.  It's just basic science.
 
2014-04-08 12:55:11 AM

Analgesic: It's a meteor.  It's moving slowly now because it impacted Flight 370 in a space/time rip.  Destroyed the plane then reappeared near this skydiver with most of its energy spent.  It's the only rational explanation.  Rocks already on Earth are bound by gravity and can't possibly get into the sky like this.  Only the smallest of them float in water and none of them are small enough to float in air.  It's just basic science.


I dunno. I'm familiar with advanced science, and I've learned that certain rocks, such as pumice, are quite light. Have you ever seen the way that pumice just floats up out of a volcano? It's almost magical how effortless it seems.
 
2014-04-08 08:42:41 AM
I'm not buying the meteor theory. It's moving way too slow and falling almost straight down. People talk about terminal velocity. That's fine for a falling object that accelerates until it reaches it. But a meteor needs to decelerate to that velocity.

So the meteor theory would require that this thing

1) slowed down from about 60,000 mph to practically nothing
2) while coming straight down through only a few miles of atmosphere
and 3) and it didn't heat up in the process.

So... ummm... why is anyone seriously considering this to be a meteor?
 
2014-04-08 09:51:07 AM
Its kinda like when somebody is telling you a really awesome story that is obviously bullshiat. Sure, its all bullshiat, but its a good story so who the fark cares?

Thats how I feel about this whole meteor thingamajig
 
2014-04-08 03:08:33 PM

Zombalupagus: So... ummm... why is anyone seriously considering this to be a meteor?


s2.hubimg.com
caracaschronicles.files.wordpress.com
i.cdn.turner.com


Of course I'd take people who believe this is a meteroid any day
 
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