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(Globe and Mail)   NASDAQ slumps on news that your app translating Shakespeare into dog isn't worth more than the GDP of most countries   (theglobeandmail.com) divider line 23
    More: Obvious, GDP, Twitter Inc., NASDAQ, Shakespeare, company, WhatsApp, Raymond James, BHP Billiton  
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2247 clicks; posted to Business » on 07 Apr 2014 at 8:18 AM (20 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



23 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-04-07 08:22:33 AM
What's dog for "no shiat Sherlock".

(I'd ask for the Elizabethan term, but Sherlock won't be around for a few centuries.)
 
2014-04-07 08:23:04 AM
rack.0.mshcdn.com
 
2014-04-07 08:24:31 AM
No duh
 
2014-04-07 08:27:58 AM
I get that Whatsapp had a large existing user base, but it was just a messaging service, indistinguishable from all the others. Or am I missing something? I don't get how they arrived at that absurd price.
 
2014-04-07 08:29:46 AM

HotWingConspiracy: I get that Whatsapp had a large existing user base, but it was just a messaging service, indistinguishable from all the others. Or am I missing something? I don't get how they arrived at that absurd price.


It's the remote possibility of buying the next Facebook before it becomes the next Facebook.
 
2014-04-07 08:30:57 AM
That's ruff
 
2014-04-07 08:44:49 AM

Evil Twin Skippy: (I'd ask for the Elizabethan term, but Sherlock won't be around for a few centuries.)


Lack of mistake, Francis Drake.
 
2014-04-07 09:12:06 AM
The tech industry is bloated, self inflated?[YouDontSay.jpg]
 
2014-04-07 09:14:42 AM
The problem with the value of most games & apps is they are ephemeral. Candy Crush might be the biggest thing around at the moment but next year it'll be history. I think it's nuts to invest in these sort of firms.

At least it should be a firm which has diversified and doesn't bet the farm on a single thing. I suspect that's why Facebook is buying everything in site at the moment - it has the cash to spend stupid amounts of money on emerging technologies in the hope that it can survive if Facebook.com begins to wane.
 
2014-04-07 09:17:56 AM
Tech stocks have been a driving force in the upswing of stock prices for some time.  Bears have been trying to tell us it's a house of cards whose collapse in imminent, bulls have been telling us that tech is the future, embrace it and invest in it; it's here to stay.

I understand and appreciate a lot of the apps that connect various services and make life a lot easier.  But every new level of technology seems to bring with it a loss of privacy and a loss of control.  While technology is fantastic and its benefits are on display in every facet of our lives, will a majority of us ever decide that, while tech is great and we love the benefits, we need to control it, not have it control us.  I think of the Amish guy I know who thinks telephones are absolutely great.  By permission of his bishop, he has one.  But it's in the barn, where he uses it for business.  It's not in the house because he is not willing to have it disrupt the family dinner, nor is he willing to be woken from sleep by an auto-dialer asking him if he wants a better rate on his (non-existent) credit card.  He also has an answering machine on it; if a customer is in his shop, he refuses to (rudely, in his opinion) disrupt whatever conversation and business that may be taking place in favor of answering the telephone.  He has the advantages of the technology for his business without the intrusiveness and loss of privacy, or being controlled by it.

Then there was a recent story about Toyota, arguably the most successful manufacturing company in the world and, at the very least, the company whose philosophy and methodology of production has been copied more than any other, pulling robots off the line and having workers, in some areas, re-learning how to do everything from forging crankshafts to assembly tasks manually.  The goal is not to get rid of robots but to learn how to master the skills so they can better "teach" the robots to perform their tasks more efficiently and with higher quality.  Akio Toyoda, the CEO, was afraid that humans have lost or may soon lose the mastery of the arts of producing the product and, as a result, would become slaves to the robots and unable to improve processes.  Will modern humans, dependent on technology for everything from talking to peers to ordering and paying for a cup of coffee, lose understanding of human processes in the same way and become slaves to the technology?  Is the skepticism about the value of these companies a reflection of some subconscious fear of exactly that?
 
2014-04-07 09:27:39 AM
Those who are slaves to technology...Beware of the EMP pulse

img.fark.net
 
2014-04-07 09:29:31 AM

RTOGUY: HotWingConspiracy: I get that Whatsapp had a large existing user base, but it was just a messaging service, indistinguishable from all the others. Or am I missing something? I don't get how they arrived at that absurd price.

It's the remote possibility of buying the next Facebook before it becomes the next Facebook.


Which is a much better business strategy when you're in an industry with high barriers to entry and high start-up costs. The Tech industry - where a good idea, a computer, and a bit of luck is all you need - it's just nuts to pay billions on a regular basis for the possibility of buying out a rival before they make it big
 
2014-04-07 10:32:52 AM

RTOGUY: HotWingConspiracy: I get that Whatsapp had a large existing user base, but it was just a messaging service, indistinguishable from all the others. Or am I missing something? I don't get how they arrived at that absurd price.

It's the remote possibility of buying the next Facebook before it becomes the next Facebook.


Sounds like a perfectly reasonable investment strategy.


/odds are probably better in Vegas
 
2014-04-07 10:59:48 AM

UtileDysfunktion: RTOGUY: HotWingConspiracy: I get that Whatsapp had a large existing user base, but it was just a messaging service, indistinguishable from all the others. Or am I missing something? I don't get how they arrived at that absurd price.

It's the remote possibility of buying the next Facebook before it becomes the next Facebook.

Sounds like a perfectly reasonable investment strategy.


/odds are probably better in Vegas


Hey, you can't win if you don't play.
 
2014-04-07 11:50:26 AM

Target Builder: RTOGUY: HotWingConspiracy: I get that Whatsapp had a large existing user base, but it was just a messaging service, indistinguishable from all the others. Or am I missing something? I don't get how they arrived at that absurd price.

It's the remote possibility of buying the next Facebook before it becomes the next Facebook.

Which is a much better business strategy when you're in an industry with high barriers to entry and high start-up costs. The Tech industry - where a good idea, a computer, and a bit of luck is all you need - it's just nuts to pay billions on a regular basis for the possibility of buying out a rival before they make it big


i think there need to be a line drawn between "social web" and "tech" because tech is something that can feasibly push things forward and opens doors to new product cycles ie: the smartphone... "social web" is basically the internet version of opening a restaurant - they're a dime-a-dozen, almost zero customer loyalty, and they're mostly recyclable...
 
2014-04-07 12:47:54 PM
Tesla is mentioned in the article. I really don't know what to think (or do) about that stock. I have some options that expire next January. I can get out now having made an OK amount of money, or I can roll the dice and stick with it. I know the valuation on that stock is iffy at best, but who knows if they'll keep doing well enough to keep the price up until next year or not?

/I always sell at the wrong damn time.
 
2014-04-07 12:50:51 PM

skrame: Tesla is mentioned in the article. I really don't know what to think (or do) about that stock. I have some options that expire next January. I can get out now having made an OK amount of money, or I can roll the dice and stick with it. I know the valuation on that stock is iffy at best, but who knows if they'll keep doing well enough to keep the price up until next year or not?

/I always sell at the wrong damn time.


Sell
 
2014-04-07 01:33:44 PM
Better to leave Shakespeare in original Klingon and teach your dog that language.....
 
2014-04-07 07:40:31 PM

skrame: Tesla is mentioned in the article. I really don't know what to think (or do) about that stock. I have some options that expire next January. I can get out now having made an OK amount of money, or I can roll the dice and stick with it. I know the valuation on that stock is iffy at best, but who knows if they'll keep doing well enough to keep the price up until next year or not?

/I always sell at the wrong damn time.


I assume you have deep in the money calls acting as a stock substitute. Why don't you sell out-of-the-money calls against this position to lower your cost basis. This strategy is known as a Poor Man's Covered Call.
 
2014-04-07 11:28:03 PM

HotWingConspiracy: I get that Whatsapp had a large existing user base, but it was just a messaging service, indistinguishable from all the others. Or am I missing something? I don't get how they arrived at that absurd price.


Whatsapp had really good lawyers in other corner.
 
2014-04-07 11:28:45 PM

Cubansaltyballs: HotWingConspiracy: I get that Whatsapp had a large existing user base, but it was just a messaging service, indistinguishable from all the others. Or am I missing something? I don't get how they arrived at that absurd price.

Whatsapp had really good lawyers in other corner.


I meant their. Goddamn autocorrect.
 
2014-04-08 03:34:50 AM

skrame: Tesla is mentioned in the article. I really don't know what to think (or do) about that stock. I have some options that expire next January. I can get out now having made an OK amount of money, or I can roll the dice and stick with it. I know the valuation on that stock is iffy at best, but who knows if they'll keep doing well enough to keep the price up until next year or not?

/I always sell at the wrong damn time.


Coming from someone who too often gets greedy and pays the price by holding too long; take this with a grain of salt.

If I'm iffy on selling or holding a stock and in the mood to 'let it ride' a bit longer, I always let the company's next earnings report make the decision for me.  I also see what analysts predict a couple of days beforehand too.
 
2014-04-08 04:29:33 AM
"We're making the world a better place ... through constructing elegant hierarchies for maximum code reuse and extensibility!"
 
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