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(Washington Post)   Fark is ruining your brain   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 14
    More: Obvious, cognitive neuroscientist, William James, Henry James, Emarketer, Marcel Proust  
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5548 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Apr 2014 at 10:10 AM (24 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2014-04-07 08:18:45 AM
3 votes:
tl;dr
2014-04-07 01:43:27 PM
2 votes:
I still love to read, sometimes even actual books with paper pages. I do find though that while once upon a time I could read crap and be relatively into it, a book now has to be much better to hold my attention enough for deep reading. Otherwise I skim until something sounds interesting enough for a closer read.

It kinda sucks, because I'm having a much harder time finding books that I like.
2014-04-07 10:31:35 AM
2 votes:

b0rscht: I really worry about this when it comes to the future of humanity. If people lose the ability to do deep contemplative uninterrupted thinking, I think it could have terrible consequences - no snark here.


You do realize that for the great part of written human existence the overwhelming majority of people didn't read at all, right?  And that reading was still pretty rare 200 years ago.  Hell, it was only about a hundred years or so ago that you could start to make the assumption that anyone you met could read as a matter of course.  Yet we managed to not only not run around banging rocks together, but crank out both written culture and technological advancements.  And even then, most people read complete schlock.  The penniless bootblack in 1812 doing a close reading of Aristotle in the original Greek is a fable. The inner city child in 1956 reading Proust for fun is a fable.  And yet we built pretty much all of human society and technology with the great teeming masses either illiterate or consuming a steady diet of Doc Sampson pulp.  Researchers and bibliovores have always been the exception.

"Oh noes!  We will have the reading habits of 1950s Americans!" is hardly the beginning of humanity fading into mentally retarded barbarity.

Not to mention, most writers are long-winded thesaurus-jockeys.  Making them cut the crap and spit out what they mean in 100 pages is not always a bad thing.  A good copy editor could have winnowed down most 1800s non-fiction tomes by a good third just by cutting the useless frippery - and most 1600s stuff could have easily be reduced to a single double-spaced page without losing one iota of meaning.
2014-04-07 10:24:26 AM
2 votes:
Here's a thought. Write something worth reading.
2014-04-07 08:47:08 AM
2 votes:
Even as a child I remember reading books then suddenly being conscious of the fact that for the last few paragraphs I've let my mind wander whilst my eyes continued moving forward, and had to go back and re-read parts. I don't think the internet is to blame for that.
2014-04-07 11:09:38 AM
1 votes:
Wow
So fark.
Much confuse.
2014-04-07 10:40:32 AM
1 votes:
Fark probably isn't helping by greening 100x the articles per day that it used to, either.  I can remember days when we would go hours without a new main page article.

/adjusts belt onion
2014-04-07 10:21:36 AM
1 votes:
Says a member of the print media whose sole purpose in life has been to rot the brains of whoever buys their rag.
2014-04-07 10:21:00 AM
1 votes:
I don't think we need the focus on recall that we used to - technology has improved to the point that it is far, far more useful to know how to get information than it is to recall all of it.

It is analogous to memorizing multiplication or integrals tables - sure, you know it when you know it, but when it doesn't fit into the set of knowledge you have memorized, what then? OTOH, if you memorize a handful of rules or steps for figuring out the answer, you can handle complex problems beyond those anticipated by the creators of the tables.

So, in short, just use Google.
2014-04-07 10:19:32 AM
1 votes:

TheShavingofOccam123: That's it. I'm not worrying anymore about the Oxford comma.


I'm sure your parents, Bozo the Clown and Liza Minnelli are okay with that.
2014-04-07 10:17:58 AM
1 votes:
That's it. I'm not worrying anymore about the Oxford comma.
2014-04-07 08:31:40 AM
1 votes:

b0rscht: Old news:  http://www.amazon.com/The-Shallows-Internet-Changing-Remember/dp/1848 8 72275

It's no surprise, really. It takes a certain sort of discipline to sit down and read like in the old days before there was all of this digital entertainment and interaction available.

I seriously worry about this with regards to my own brain - being a professor/researcher and all. I can do it when I force myself to but it's harder than it used to be.


Make it a habit.

I read books still.  I stopped reading fiction, for the most part, but I keep my brain active by doing things the hard way intentionally.  That's not to say I don't do mindless entertainment, of course, but my head isn't always stuck at an electronic screen.
2014-04-07 08:28:51 AM
1 votes:
Old news:  http://www.amazon.com/The-Shallows-Internet-Changing-Remember/dp/1848 8 72275

It's no surprise, really. It takes a certain sort of discipline to sit down and read like in the old days before there was all of this digital entertainment and interaction available.

I seriously worry about this with regards to my own brain - being a professor/researcher and all. I can do it when I force myself to but it's harder than it used to be.

I really worry about this when it comes to the future of humanity. If people lose the ability to do deep contemplative uninterrupted thinking, I think it could have terrible consequences - no snark here.
2014-04-07 08:12:58 AM
1 votes:
I like to think it's a mutually detrimental arrangement.
 
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