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(The Consumerist)   Are you carefully storing your fruits and vegetables after buying them? Well, you're probably doing it wrong   (consumerist.com) divider line 7
    More: Interesting, Take Care, America's Test Kitchen, vegetables, green shoots, fruits  
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9730 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Apr 2014 at 2:19 AM (29 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Funniest)
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2014-04-07 03:12:50 AM  
2 votes:
You can make lettuce soup in your refrigerator.

Place fresh head of lettuce (use romaine for a tangier soup) in plastic produce bag
Leave in refrigerator for 6 weeks

Be sure to check the plastic bag periodically for leaks. The soup will try to escape from any tiny hole in the bag!

After 6 weeks, take bag out of refrigerator, pour soup into a bowl. Heat in microwave for 30 seconds to kill any remaining bacteria or organisms.

Serve with a garnish of paprika and mustard seed.

Pairs well with Argentinian wines.
2014-04-07 03:12:42 AM  
2 votes:

GDubDub: Threadjack:

My internet is out, so I logged in to an unsecured wireless on my phone, hacked their router, gave it a password, and changed their net name to "Please Secure This"

Wondering how many crimes I have committed.


Name your phone connection NSA for shiats and giggles
2014-04-07 04:27:28 AM  
1 votes:

mr0x: Emposter: That's a short list, but I appear to be doing it right.

Also, I'm a 12th level master of the school of "eating it before it goes bad."

Sadly, the fruit and veggies store is 10 miles away from me and I can only go there once a week.

The closer ones gouge prices on fruits and veggies and they have to be "on sale" to even be reasonable. The prices are x3-x4 the price when not on sale.

So, I have loads of stuff I have to store every week. Something always goes bad because I forget it in the back.


I live about a mile away from an H-Mart.  I have no idea what those crazy asians do to their vegetables, but they are gigantic and cheap as all get out.  Green onions at Safeway are maybe a centimeter in diameter if you get good ones...H-Mart green onions are the size of leeks.  We're talking inch thick green onions.  It's awesome.  Bell peppers that are at least half again as big as the ones I can get at Safeway or Costco.  And they sell snow peas for 99 cents/pound.  I regularly go and just throw 2 pounds in a bag and munch on them all week.  Sure, I probably have lead and/or melamine poisoning, but hey, no one lives forever and I love snow peas.

The only thing I have trouble eating in time is herbs...primarily cilantro.  That stuff just seems to go bad in virtually seconds.  Thankfully it's damned cheap.
2014-04-07 02:38:00 AM  
1 votes:
They missed the biggest tip.

Don't buy more produce than you can use before it goes bad.
2014-04-07 02:30:45 AM  
1 votes:
Threadjack:

My internet is out, so I logged in to an unsecured wireless on my phone, hacked their router, gave it a password, and changed their net name to "Please Secure This"

Wondering how many crimes I have committed.
2014-04-07 02:22:16 AM  
1 votes:
That's a short list, but I appear to be doing it right.

Also, I'm a 12th level master of the school of "eating it before it goes bad."
2014-04-06 11:58:45 PM  
1 votes:
gases from the onions can hasting sprouting in potatoes

Onions can hasting?
 
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