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(Yahoo)   Five things you should always buy used. Sorry, Pervy McPervyson, but panties aren't on the list   (finance.yahoo.com) divider line 176
    More: Obvious, Pervy McPervyson, designer labels, exercise equipment  
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15770 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Apr 2014 at 6:47 PM (42 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-06 08:44:07 PM  
Guitars
Cars (if done carefully)
Guns
 
2014-04-06 08:44:17 PM  
What about jewelry and sterling flatware?  You don't want to pay retail for those items.
 
2014-04-06 08:46:22 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: A check for $25k will get you a nice 3 year old ride you can beat the ever loving crap out of, and then get a new one five years later.


Or you can buy a 13 year old Lexus for $10,000 that will last you another decade, though you'll have to throw in a little money here and there for maintenance.

/love my ancient Lexus
//reliable, comfy ride
///and fun to drive, too
 
2014-04-06 08:47:00 PM  
I bought my 2001 Saturn SC2 new, have 180k miles on it, and have spent a grand total of about $3500 in ALL maintenance and repairs--including the big service milestones.  Only has two actual repairs--one was a gasket that cost $35 and one was exhaust-related.  Anecdotally, I've known many Saturn owners who got 200k, rebuilt the engine, and then got another 200k out of them.  Considering going that route to avoid a car payment.  Thinking $3500 of work--engine, transmission, shocks/struts--would likely get me another 13 years.

Hate that GM killed Saturns.  Stupidest marketing decision ever was to try to "class them up"--they were an awesome American made economy car, and should have been marketed as such.  Now they're gone...

/sobs
 
2014-04-06 08:47:03 PM  

Ambivalence: I am going to disagree on the cars.  Used cars are not "a fraction of its original sticker price" at 2-3 years of age, not if they're any good.  I buy new cars from quality manufacturers and I drive it for 10 years or more until I am literally sick of dealing with whatever issues arise. MY car.  MY butt groove on the seat.  broken in to MY driving style.


99/100 is still a fraction, dude.
 
2014-04-06 08:48:34 PM  

Ambivalence: Englebert Slaptyback: Ambivalence

The use of "Fraction" implies a significant savings that does not exist.


According to KBB.com:

new 2014 Audi A4 Premium w/ AWD and automatic: ~$34,000

2011 Audi A4 w/ AWD and automatic, 45K miles: ~$24,000 (from a dealer)

A 30% reduction in price is not "significant"?

You don't compare against current year model but against "original sticker price".  How much did that vehicle cost in 2011?


I also calculate the cost per month owned. So if I drive that in-warranty new car for four years and sell it for $24k, it's costing me $200/mo.  If I drive the 2011 out-of-warranty for four years, am I going to sell it for $14k, with no warranty left and 100k miles? So then my real cost has been $10,000 to drive a car for four years, in both cases.  I know, it doesn't simplify  exactly this way, but depending on the model, warranty, resale history, and availability of 0.0 - 1.9% financing for extended time periods, you're not really saving  that much in real dollars.
 
2014-04-06 08:50:35 PM  
Pro bike/ski mechanic. If you wish to round off and destroy fasteners go ahead and buy cheap tools. My $0.02.

Would add skis and bikes to that list.
 
2014-04-06 08:51:06 PM  

FizixJunkee: Ambivalence: I am going to disagree on the cars.  Used cars are not "a fraction of its original sticker price" at 2-3 years of age, not if they're any good.  I buy new cars from quality manufacturers and I drive it for 10 years or more until I am literally sick of dealing with whatever issues arise. MY car.  MY butt groove on the seat.  broken in to MY driving style.

99/100 is still a fraction, dude.


So is 100/1, but I'm pretty sure we all know that the author isn't talking about buying a 3-year-old Honda Fit for $1 million.
 
2014-04-06 08:51:24 PM  

ChubbyTiger: Haven't seen a car that I wanted under $30k in ages.


I have an old Lexus RX300 that I absolutely love.  I have zero envy for any other car I see on the road, regardless of price.
 
2014-04-06 08:52:42 PM  
I'm a Jeep guy & with those it depends on what part of the country you're in, around here Wranglers hold their value very well (this is 4WD country) but in other states they don't.

I'm also a drummer & avid Ludwig fan, always gets me when I see a '68 Acrolite some dumbass wants $500 because he thinks they're rare. Dude, they've been making the things since 1962 & even Ludwig has no idea how many they've made, they're worth $100 tops. Top of the line Zildjians though can be had for 1/2 price used, in excellent condition because daddy bought the kid a set & 6 months later he's given up learning.

I always buy good hand tools, farked up too much cheap crap to waste my money on those anymore.
 
2014-04-06 08:53:43 PM  
Bought a 98 jeep with 160000 miles on it for $700 put another 60000 since. prob put $1500 in to repairs. So that's $2200 for 60000 miles worth and still going. before this i had a brand new car...was totalled in an accident 100% NOT my fault...insurance paid out just enough to pay it off leaving me screwed. not to mention my insurance went from $400+ to $100. No new cars for me anytime soon
 
2014-04-06 08:55:34 PM  

Jim_Callahan: Ambivalence: Marcus Aurelius: Buy all your tools new and do not skimp on them in any way.  Buy the best and it will last a lifetime.

Cars, on the other hand, are disposable.  A check for $25k will get you a nice 3 year old ride you can beat the ever loving crap out of, and then get a new one five years later.

Jesus, who in the hell pays $25k for a car?  Not a truck or an SUV, mind you, a car.

Yeah, even NEW cars only run like 17k - 24k if you're buying a basic "gets you from A to B" vehicle or a light-duty truck.

If you're paying much more than 10 or maybe 12 for a used vehicle you're getting ripped off.


We bought a new car in 2006. It was about 22K total. It's a damned fine car. Never needs anything except oil, tires, and wiper fluid. It is very safe and very reliable, which is what we needed when we bought it because of the upcoming baby. When the next baby came, I sold my old S-10 and bought a 1996 Volvo for much the same reasons. I've had to do quite a bit of work on the Volvo, but it's never let me down and it's still running strong everyday. 22k and worth every penny vs 2k and worth every penny. But it's not like I'd trade one for another.

/don't know why I responded to you there
//i think I had a point, but the wine took over
 
2014-04-06 08:55:40 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: Ambivalence

You don't compare against current year model but against "original sticker price". How much did that vehicle cost in 2011?


We're talking about new vs used and how a used car is significantly cheaper than a new car. Unless you're prepared to time travel to buy a new 2011, its sticker price doesn't matter.

Be sure to lift with your legs so you don't hurt yourself moving the goalposts around.


The distinction should actually be low sticker price vs high sticker price.  You're probably not going to save that much money buying a late model economy car, the new versions just aren't that much more expensive and the used car will be financed at a higher rate.
 
2014-04-06 08:55:40 PM  

The Goat Men Are Rampaging In The Fields: I bought my 2001 Saturn SC2 new, have 180k miles on it, and have spent a grand total of about $3500 in ALL maintenance and repairs--including the big service milestones.  Only has two actual repairs--one was a gasket that cost $35 and one was exhaust-related.  Anecdotally, I've known many Saturn owners who got 200k, rebuilt the engine, and then got another 200k out of them.  Considering going that route to avoid a car payment.  Thinking $3500 of work--engine, transmission, shocks/struts--would likely get me another 13 years.

Hate that GM killed Saturns.  Stupidest marketing decision ever was to try to "class them up"--they were an awesome American made economy car, and should have been marketed as such.  Now they're gone...

/sobs


I just got rid of my '96 Saturn SW2 with 280K miles on it. It had a Jasper rebuild put in at 148K.
 
2014-04-06 08:57:28 PM  

Bacontastesgood: Or, buy a 3 year old Hyundai for a great price and immediately develop a good relationship with a mechanic or parts supplier.


My husband has a 12 year old Hyundai with 112,000 miles on it that's never needed anything beyond routine maintenance.  It's been a great car for us.

/yes, he bought it new
//it runs great and is super reliable
///I still prefer my Lexus
 
2014-04-06 08:59:26 PM  

The_Original_Roxtar: anuran: The_Original_Roxtar:
enjoy your plebemobile.

many of us like cars and see them as more than simple transit.

And many of us realize there are more productive ways to get status and breeding rights. We aren't racing. We aren't driving off-road. All we care about is an economical, safe way of getting from one place to another.

Of course, if you need a penis extension by all means spend an extra fifty thousand on it.

it always comes down to the implied sexual insecurity with you guys. My vehicles have nothing to do with sex.

My motorcycle is more economical and a lot faster than your shiatmobile elantra.
My project 944 cost me less than $2k and is a blast to drive through the mountains or the race track.
My 3-series has a great balance of reliability, cost, and efficiency to make it a great daily.

yes, all you care about is an economical, safe a-b transportation appliance. why don't you ride the bus? I like cars... and so (like any other hobby) I'm content to spend a few dollars extra to get something nice.
We all have hobbies... surely there is something you spend unnecessary money on for the pure enjoyment of it. if not, why you so poor bro?


I like how you open with "plebemobile" and then get all butthurt when someone throws out the penis jokes.
 
2014-04-06 09:00:54 PM  

verbivore: FizixJunkee: Ambivalence: I am going to disagree on the cars.  Used cars are not "a fraction of its original sticker price" at 2-3 years of age, not if they're any good.  I buy new cars from quality manufacturers and I drive it for 10 years or more until I am literally sick of dealing with whatever issues arise. MY car.  MY butt groove on the seat.  broken in to MY driving style.

99/100 is still a fraction, dude.

So is 100/1, but I'm pretty sure we all know that the author isn't talking about buying a 3-year-old Honda Fit for $1 million.


You don't fraction much, do you?
 
2014-04-06 09:14:00 PM  

nanim: BumpInTheNight: Actually with computers I have been pushing the Intel NUCs, they are incredible for a light-weight desktop.  The I3 model is about $500 after buying it some ram, an mSSD and its power cord (farking hell, they don't include the PSU->wall portion of the power cord...dicks).  My reasoning is longer term savings and over all coolness of the little thing.

The cool:
Its a tiny little rectangle that's packing laptop caliber parts.
It can boot to windows in under 10 seconds.
You pick the ram & storage capacity depending on need.

The practical:
The power consumption is next to nothing, 11w idle and 22w doing something 'strenuous' like HD netflix playback or even light gaming.  Over the course of five years it'll cost me $56 to run one 24/7, vs $850 to run a clunker old Pentium 4 or core2duo desktop for the same its a savings in itself even if the desktop was given for free.

I've been a big fan since buying one for a proper can-do-anything media PC for the living room TV, great little machines.

/I am not an Intel shill I swear
//best thing in computing since the SSD in my opinion

--
hm - thanks for the idea


At that price point, you might want to look at a slightly older mac mini too. I got one for my media center (2011 I think) and it is flawless. Memory is easily upgradeable too. HD is a bit more complicated but not any worse than any other mini-ITX computer I've seen.
 
2014-04-06 09:17:56 PM  

baka-san: Umm, no

"a screwdriver is a screwdriver"

no

Writer is a dumbass who probably doesn't even know "righty tighty, lefty loosy"


Thank you, I clicked comments to write the same thing.
I have several dozen screw drivers, and the more expensive they are, the longer they last, the better they work, and the less likely they are to be put on a yard sale.
 
2014-04-06 09:26:23 PM  

baka-san: Umm, no

"a screwdriver is a screwdriver"

no

Writer is a dumbass who probably doesn't even know "righty tighty, lefty loosy"


Agreed.  Junk tools are generally not worth it.  (I will admit to buying cheap tools *ONCE*--I needed sockets to change the battery in my car so I bought an el-cheapo set that now lives in the car.)

Ambivalence: I am going to disagree on the cars.  Used cars are not "a fraction of its original sticker price" at 2-3 years of age, not if they're any good.  I buy new cars from quality manufacturers and I drive it for 10 years or more until I am literally sick of dealing with whatever issues arise. MY car.  MY butt groove on the seat.  broken in to MY driving style.


Agreed.  The advice makes sense if you're dealing with luxury cars, otherwise, no.  If you buy a cheaper car a few years old you're most likely buying someone else's problems.  My father made that mistake with his last car--at least he knew how to drive a car that needed to be double-clutched.

I buy new and drive it until it's ready for the wreckers.

Target Builder: Baby and Toddler Clothing: Sure, if you need to save cash. That said, baby clothing is cheap compared to formula or diapers.


Boobies are a lot cheaper than formula.

chitownmike: I understand why you are having a problem understanding this, carpenters are dumb, but don't worry about it you can keep buying shiat tools from harbor freight, if you want to


Agreed.  Some years back I bought some air hose fittings there, I figured there was no way they could do those wrong.  They did--the fittings would leak if there was any sideways pressure on them (the weight of the air hose was enough.)

skinink: Bull. A computer from 2011 is worthless? I'm confused by your worthless remark being followed by a story about Pentium 2's. And computer from 2011 is going to be a Windows 7 with most like a dual core processor minimum and should have 4GB memory and a decent size hard drive. And even if it's on board graphics and sound, that should handle the majority of things needed to do.


Yeah, what's worthless about that?  This box is from 2011, the motherboard is about to be replaced but because of a failure, not because it's obsolete.  It's no casual box, either, 7.5 windows experience.
 
2014-04-06 09:29:38 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: Ambivalence

You don't compare against current year model but against "original sticker price". How much did that vehicle cost in 2011?


We're talking about new vs used and how a used car is significantly cheaper than a new car. Unless you're prepared to time travel to buy a new 2011, its sticker price doesn't matter.

Be sure to lift with your legs so you don't hurt yourself moving the goalposts around.


I'm not moving goalposts, the article said used cars are a fraction of their ORIGINAL STICKER PRICE.  I am refuting that.  You are being retarded and trying to make it about something else.
 
2014-04-06 09:39:39 PM  
Bad advice, Yahoo. If people only buy used cars, where the hell am I gonna buy mine? Because I sure as hell ain't payin' for a new one.
 
2014-04-06 09:40:50 PM  
You should only buy "used" if you know what it is you are buying.
 
2014-04-06 09:50:41 PM  

twiztedjustin: Guns


No kidding.  My best ever pawn shop purchase was a HK USP45 for $400.
 
2014-04-06 10:09:12 PM  

MidnightSkulker: If you have to finance a vehicle purchase, buying new can easily make good sense between 0% financing deals and factory rebates. Used car finance rates are ridiculous.


Not necessarily, you just need an awesome credit union. Auto loans at mine are 2% up to 60 months for any vehicle 2102 or newer, and about a half percent more for anything less than 9 years old. You do need to have good credit, though. Love my credit union.

Business grade computers are almost indestructible. I'm using an Optiplex 755 desktop now. Big insurance company I work with replaces their computers every three years. I bring one home for free, slap a Linux distro on it and use it for three more years. Rinse and repeat. My laptop is a lease-returned Dell E4300.
 
2014-04-06 10:13:46 PM  
Bought our Sienna back in 2009 as CPO. Was 1yr old with 22k miles (livery veh). Paid $18,500 with 5 yr full warranty and roadside asstance. Opened the glovebox when I got home to find orig sticker ... $27,000

Still like new. No rattles, no issues, no rust.
 
2014-04-06 10:15:53 PM  

ZzeusS: Picked up a 97 Honda Accord with 80k miles for $3k.  Paid cash.  Still feel pretty good about that one.  Been driving it for about a year and a half now.  Brakes, Rotors and 12k service will be ~$600.


I grabbed an '02 civic with a manual tranny and 140k miles on it for $4600 more than two years ago to commute to college, shop, and take the kids to school. I've put 40k miles on it with no issues aside from scheduled maintenance. It's not glamorous and the clear paint coat is peeling in places, but it's safe, cheap, reliable, and gets 30mpg.
 
2014-04-06 10:17:20 PM  

twiztedjustin: Guitars
Cars (if done carefully)
Guns


Agreed. Extend guitars to almost any musical instrument. I got a fantastic old flute. You just need to sterilize well.
 
2014-04-06 10:28:08 PM  
Media like

Books
Video Games
DVDs
 
2014-04-06 10:38:33 PM  

trappedspirit: I like new cars.  And knowing that I will be the first to inject deep cushion farts for whoever has to buy it used later.  You get what you pay for.


The exact reason my wife insisted on a new car. "No one has farted in it yet."

The person that owned my truck before me liked White Castle. Onion farts have a staying power like no other...
 
2014-04-06 10:43:07 PM  

skinink: TheTurtle: skinink: I think people can buy used computers that have been wiped and from offices that have upgraded computers. I think the majority of people do not need to splurge money on the latest and greatest if they only do basic things with their computers (web surf, email, moderate picture editing, streaming video, games that do not need the best CPU and GPU). There's no reason to spend on a new computer. Most people have slow computers because they don't do basic maintenance on their computers so it gets cluttered up and slow.

...but anything over about three years old is basically worthless, except Apple, in which case it's maybe six years.  Friends call me and ask if I need their old 2003 Windows XP desktop with a monster power-wasting 15" CRT and a whopping 120Gb hard drive, and I tell them, no, my phone is probably more powerful.

Place I used to work (large federal), used to put all their retired desktops on pallets and give them to churches and schools, until the churches and schools started telling us, "we already have Pentium IIs, why the fark do we want your old 286es?"  They all went to landfills after that.

Bull. A computer from 2011 is worthless? I'm confused by your worthless remark being followed by a story about Pentium 2's. And computer from 2011 is going to be a Windows 7 with most like a dual core processor minimum and should have 4GB memory and a decent size hard drive. And even if it's on board graphics and sound, that should handle the majority of things needed to do.

Unless you're doing heavy media editing, compiling, playing games requiring top line components, then a computer from 2011 properly configured should be viable. What has changed in the three years since that would make a computer worthless?


I'm rocking a 4 year old HP laptop. Don't remember the processor other than it's dual core. 4g ram.
It sees a lot of light use but I do use Photoshop and Lightro heavily as well as some light video editing in Premiere. Slow as fark to render but it has worked.
I finally upgraded my camera and the files are massive and it just doesn't have the power to be as effecient as I would like. Hell, it took 10 minutes tonight to export 7 photos from raw to jpg. Not horrible but it shouldn't be that slow.
Went from a 20D-7D. Low light has always been crap on the 20D but the farker just keeps working. Finally got something newer because I got sick of the low light performance plus the shiatty lcd. And shooting HD video is nice, too.
 
2014-04-06 10:54:24 PM  
What's really great is buying something used that you know was hardly used because it was one of those things you should lease.  I had a doctor that once told me you should rent stuff that floats. farks, or flies.  It really all depends on how much you are going to use it.  Not on how much you think you are going to use it.  Lots of people get excited about things like boats and then don't realize how much time these things will take to enjoy them properly and end up getting conned into spending cash on a boat they really don't have time to spend with in terms of maintenance and operation.  So boats, for example, are a pretty stable thing to say getting a used one is the way to go.  Because you can easily take advantage of the position someone has been conned into by buying it in the first place.  So keep feeding off of yourselves.  We can't drag ourselves down individually.  We all need to participate.
 
2014-04-06 10:55:58 PM  
When we went shopping for a car, we assumed we'd get about 130k miles out of a car (i.e. when the car reached 130k miles) before it'll probably need to be replaced.  When we looked at $/mile of a new car, versus a used car, the used cars were never as good a bargain.  Even more so when you factored in the financing options between new and used (we could get 0% on a new, 2% on a used).

If you're going to hang on to it for a long time, always go new.
 
2014-04-06 11:05:34 PM  
The only thing I would buy used would be a car, and that's about it.

As for power tools, I've seen far to many people abuse them to ever consider buying them used. Who knows how long that saw or drill spent sliding around in the back of some guys pick-up getting rained on and tossed around. You're taking a high gamble when you buy those things used.

As for hand tools, the only place I've ever seen used for sale is in some crappy pawn shop where they'll have them tossed in a bin with dozens of other like tools, all slowly rusting away. I doubt you would even be able to piece together a matching set of wrenches at most places.
 
2014-04-06 11:06:32 PM  

Ambivalence


I'm not moving goalposts, the article said used cars are a fraction of their ORIGINAL STICKER PRICE. I am refuting that. You are being retarded and trying to make it about something else.


Sounds like someone missed his nap today.

The discussion here on Fark.com is about the price of buying new vs the price of buying used. That's it. And that is what I explained earlier.

However, since you are so hung up on the ORIGINAL STICKER PRICE!!ELEVENTY, I looked it up.

Cars.com says the price of the 2011 Audi A4 AWD with a manual transmission (they didn't show auto.) was $33,200. OMG that's HUGE difference from the $34,000 I mentioned upthread.

Oh wait, that difference will go away when the cost of the optional automatic transmission is added. Unless Audi charged only a few hundred dollars, which I doubt.

In short, you remain wrong. Good luck with that.
 
2014-04-06 11:10:10 PM  

Barfmaker: TinyFist: " A screwdriver is a screwdriver. It's simple and no single one is really better than the other."

I will stab the author in the dick with one of my Klein flatheads or one of my Wiha's.

I'm not even joking.

Oh get off it, MOST people have no need for specialized or expensive tools. You do, that's great but you can't possibly think that it's anywhere near common.

I was a carpenter for many years and I have no idea what those brands are...sounds a tad hipsterish to me.


Some of my favorite tools came from estate sales.

/none of the tools I actually needed, just my favorite ones.
 
2014-04-06 11:12:12 PM  

trappedspirit: What's really great is buying something used that you know was hardly used because it was one of those things you should lease.  I had a doctor that once told me you should rent stuff that floats. farks, or flies.  It really all depends on how much you are going to use it.  Not on how much you think you are going to use it.  Lots of people get excited about things like boats and then don't realize how much time these things will take to enjoy them properly and end up getting conned into spending cash on a boat they really don't have time to spend with in terms of maintenance and operation.  So boats, for example, are a pretty stable thing to say getting a used one is the way to go.  Because you can easily take advantage of the position someone has been conned into by buying it in the first place.  So keep feeding off of yourselves.  We can't drag ourselves down individually.  We all need to participate.


Pretty much anyone I've ever known who's bought a boat has the same story. The first season they were out on it nearly every weekend. The next season, they might have taken it our 3-4 times. By the third season it sat in their driveway and about half way through they stuck a 4-sale sign on it.
 
2014-04-06 11:16:06 PM  

The_Original_Roxtar: Barfmaker: TinyFist: " A screwdriver is a screwdriver. It's simple and no single one is really better than the other."

I will stab the author in the dick with one of my Klein flatheads or one of my Wiha's.

I'm not even joking.

Oh get off it, MOST people have no need for specialized or expensive tools. You do, that's great but you can't possibly think that it's anywhere near common.

I was a carpenter for many years and I have no idea what those brands are...sounds a tad hipsterish to me.

it's not "specialized" or "expensive". it's cast bullshiat vs forged tools.
I've bent so many cheap-ass screwdrivers, it's really not worth buying the cheap ones.


I used to have the same problem. Started spraying my tools with WD40Kryptonite, now they last longer.
-Clark
 
2014-04-06 11:22:30 PM  
images.lacarmina.com
 
2014-04-06 11:55:47 PM  
Honest question: What is the average joe using their tools that they're getting that messed up that badly? I do general repairs around my house, but I've had the same cheap ass screw driver set that came in my $20 computer repair set back in high school.
 
2014-04-07 12:04:32 AM  

skinink: TheTurtle: skinink: I think people can buy used computers that have been wiped and from offices that have upgraded computers. I think the majority of people do not need to splurge money on the latest and greatest if they only do basic things with their computers (web surf, email, moderate picture editing, streaming video, games that do not need the best CPU and GPU). There's no reason to spend on a new computer. Most people have slow computers because they don't do basic maintenance on their computers so it gets cluttered up and slow.

...but anything over about three years old is basically worthless, except Apple, in which case it's maybe six years.  Friends call me and ask if I need their old 2003 Windows XP desktop with a monster power-wasting 15" CRT and a whopping 120Gb hard drive, and I tell them, no, my phone is probably more powerful.

Place I used to work (large federal), used to put all their retired desktops on pallets and give them to churches and schools, until the churches and schools started telling us, "we already have Pentium IIs, why the fark do we want your old 286es?"  They all went to landfills after that.

Bull. A computer from 2011 is worthless? I'm confused by your worthless remark being followed by a story about Pentium 2's. And computer from 2011 is going to be a Windows 7 with most like a dual core processor minimum and should have 4GB memory and a decent size hard drive. And even if it's on board graphics and sound, that should handle the majority of things needed to do.

Unless you're doing heavy media editing, compiling, playing games requiring top line components, then a computer from 2011 properly configured should be viable. What has changed in the three years since that would make a computer worthless?


Well, if it's a laptop, anything older than 3 years is pretty untrustworthy. No matter how good it started out. And it's almost impossible to upgrade major components.

A desktop? You'll get another few years if the processor was high end when it was new. But if it was middling then, it's going to be slow now - there's so much more stuff on the internet that overuses Flash and Java, downloading HD video....and don't even thinking about upgrading to Windows 8.1 or whatever comes next. Is it ok if you don't do anything fancier than word processing? Yeah. Is it ok for low-grade photoshop (like, just correcting red-eye) or complex Excel sheets? Barely.

By the time you upgrade the likely components (memory, video card if it has one, optical drive will no doubt break soon if it didn't get replaced already - those things are really failure prone) and fight your way through getting Windows to let you reinstall after you wipe the hard drive and bios completely (which is necessary if you want to ensure a lack of viruses and cruft).... a middling new one is well under $500 these days, so it's not worth it unless the sucker was free.

/still using my 5-year-old Lenovo laptop, but I literally can't do anything that really uses the video card or it just shuts off after 20min - and it was $2000 new
//need to double-check the $1000 gaming desktop build my little brother designed for me, and then build it
///5 years ago, a power laptop was worth it living in a small apartment, but now that flat screens are cheap, desktop+tablet is way cheaper
 
2014-04-07 12:05:46 AM  

baka-san: Umm, no

"a screwdriver is a screwdriver"

no

Writer is a dumbass who probably doesn't even know "righty tighty, lefty loosy"


A flashlight is a flashlight.
www.fenixtactical.com
Yeah, that's like the ones they sell for 5 bucks at Walmart. That author is an idiot.


Some of those cheap home kit screwdrivers are made with plastic shafts covered with a coating that looks like chrome. I tried to use one to pry open a can of paint and it snapped in half.
 
2014-04-07 12:16:56 AM  

Ambivalence: I'm not moving goalposts, the article said used cars are a fraction of their ORIGINAL STICKER PRICE.

 

They absolutely are if you don't buy them from a dealer.  Private sellers are the way to go for used vehicles, if you have any mechanical aptitude whatsoever. I have never paid more than bluebook for a used vehicle. 

Ambivalence: I think I paid $17k for my last car, new, WITH extended warranty and that was the most I ever spent on a car (Honda Fit if anyone's wondering).


I just found 2 late model Honda Fits for sale by owner near me for $4500 (2008) and $9000 (2011).  And that's the asking price, not the final price after haggling.
 
2014-04-07 12:19:22 AM  

itsaidwhat: The_Original_Roxtar: Barfmaker: TinyFist: " A screwdriver is a screwdriver. It's simple and no single one is really better than the other."

I will stab the author in the dick with one of my Klein flatheads or one of my Wiha's.

I'm not even joking.


I'm willing to take that one step further and say a double wedge type flathead isn't good for anything but opening paint cans. Hollow ground O-1 or drill rod that fits the screw head is best. Period. If you think a screwdriver is a screwdriver you do not know tools at all. I'm not a "tool diva" I just use them and make my own sometimes and know what is best. I can look at a screw and see if you used the right driver on it. Much like using a 12 point vs. a 6 point socket
There are good tools that can be bought used and cheap, but there are few new quality tools that can be bought cheap. Certain harbor freight tools can be ok. Wire brushes, chipping hammers, pry bars, low duty electrical tools, etc.. But you certainly don't want to buy what should be precision tools like a set of thread taps and dies or even files from there.
 
2014-04-07 12:20:49 AM  

Moonfisher: I got a fantastic old flute.


What did you get?

I once found a Haynes flute in a pawn shop.  The price was very good (though not dirt cheap...they had some clue what they had); I sold two other flutes just to buy that thing.  And, yes, it was worth it.
 
2014-04-07 12:21:59 AM  

The Goat Men Are Rampaging In The Fields: I bought my 2001 Saturn SC2 new, have 180k miles on it, and have spent a grand total of about $3500 in ALL maintenance and repairs--including the big service milestones. Only has two actual repairs--one was a gasket that cost $35 and one was exhaust-related. Anecdotally, I've known many Saturn owners who got 200k, rebuilt the engine, and then got another 200k out of them. Considering going that route to avoid a car payment. Thinking $3500 of work--engine, transmission, shocks/struts--would likely get me another 13 years.

Hate that GM killed Saturns. Stupidest marketing decision ever was to try to "class them up"--they were an awesome American made economy car, and should have been marketed as such. Now they're gone...


Yeah, I got rid of my 2000 SL1 6 months ago--the drive shaft seal was leaking.  There were other things that were going to need work also, I decided it wasn't worth keeping.  It gave good service over those years, it was my second and I would have been happy to get a third.

At least Toyota finally realized they were selling to Americans and made a car with enough foot space I could drive it, I now have a Corolla.  (In the past the space between the floor and the dash was almost exactly the size of my size 13 foot--not a good idea if you had to react quickly.)

New Age Redneck: Pro bike/ski mechanic. If you wish to round off and destroy fasteners go ahead and buy cheap tools. My $0.02.


This.  The cheap tools slip more.

ReapTheChaos: As for power tools, I've seen far to many people abuse them to ever consider buying them used. Who knows how long that saw or drill spent sliding around in the back of some guys pick-up getting rained on and tossed around. You're taking a high gamble when you buy those things used.


Exactly.  Those of us who take care of tools don't want the junk that results from people who don't take care of them.

ornithopter: Well, if it's a laptop, anything older than 3 years is pretty untrustworthy. No matter how good it started out. And it's almost impossible to upgrade major components.


I have an IIRC 8 year old laptop that's seen light use and is still working fine.  I also have an IIRC 11 year old one that's a bit flaky but gives my wife no trouble using it for Skype.  I do agree you can't upgrade anything but the drives.
 
2014-04-07 12:22:26 AM  
ornithopter: A desktop? You'll get another few years if the processor was high end when it was new. But if it was middling then, it's going to be slow now - there's so much more stuff on the internet that overuses Flash and Java, downloading HD video....and don't even thinking about upgrading to Windows 8.1 or whatever comes next. Is it ok if you don't do anything fancier than word processing? Yeah. Is it ok for low-grade photoshop (like, just correcting red-eye) or complex Excel sheets? Barely.

What in FSM's name are you talking about? Sandy Bridge is over 3 years old at this point, and the i5 2500K powering my desktop is still plenty to stream HD video, run a full Ubuntu VM and play video games at the same time. It was quite firmly in the "mid-range" at the time too.
 
2014-04-07 12:28:41 AM  

ornithopter: skinink: TheTurtle: skinink: I think people can buy used computers that have been wiped and from offices that have upgraded computers. I think the majority of people do not need to splurge money on the latest and greatest if they only do basic things with their computers (web surf, email, moderate picture editing, streaming video, games that do not need the best CPU and GPU). There's no reason to spend on a new computer. Most people have slow computers because they don't do basic maintenance on their computers so it gets cluttered up and slow.

...but anything over about three years old is basically worthless, except Apple, in which case it's maybe six years.  Friends call me and ask if I need their old 2003 Windows XP desktop with a monster power-wasting 15" CRT and a whopping 120Gb hard drive, and I tell them, no, my phone is probably more powerful.

Place I used to work (large federal), used to put all their retired desktops on pallets and give them to churches and schools, until the churches and schools started telling us, "we already have Pentium IIs, why the fark do we want your old 286es?"  They all went to landfills after that.

Bull. A computer from 2011 is worthless? I'm confused by your worthless remark being followed by a story about Pentium 2's. And computer from 2011 is going to be a Windows 7 with most like a dual core processor minimum and should have 4GB memory and a decent size hard drive. And even if it's on board graphics and sound, that should handle the majority of things needed to do.

Unless you're doing heavy media editing, compiling, playing games requiring top line components, then a computer from 2011 properly configured should be viable. What has changed in the three years since that would make a computer worthless?

Well, if it's a laptop, anything older than 3 years is pretty untrustworthy. No matter how good it started out. And it's almost impossible to upgrade major components.

A desktop? You'll get another few years if the processor was high end when it was new. But if it was middling then, it's going to be slow now - there's so much more stuff on the internet that overuses Flash and Java, downloading HD video....and don't even thinking about upgrading to Windows 8.1 or whatever comes next. Is it ok if you don't do anything fancier than word processing? Yeah. Is it ok for low-grade photoshop (like, just correcting red-eye) or complex Excel sheets? Barely.

By the time you upgrade the likely components (memory, video card if it has one, optical drive will no doubt break soon if it didn't get replaced already - those things are really failure prone) and fight your way through getting Windows to let you reinstall after you wipe the hard drive and bios completely (which is necessary if you want to ensure a lack of viruses and cruft).... a middling new one is well under $500 these days, so it's not worth it unless the sucker was free.

/still using my 5-year-old Lenovo laptop, but I literally can't do anything that really uses the video card or it just shuts off after 20min - and it was $2000 new
//need to double-check the $1000 gaming desktop build my little brother designed for me, and then build it
///5 years ago, a power laptop was worth it living in a small apartment, but now that flat screens are cheap, desktop+tablet is way cheaper


Windows 8 runs very well on very modest spec machines. I installed it on my second pc I made from my seven year old modest spec mobo and processor and on a very modest spec netbook with 1gb of ram. It runs great, far faster than XP did on the same machines.
 
2014-04-07 12:40:28 AM  

TinyFist: " A screwdriver is a screwdriver. It's simple and no single one is really better than the other."

I will stab the author in the dick with one of my Klein flatheads or one of my Wiha's.

I'm not even joking.


I don't really bother with the Kleins for the bigger screwdrivers, I just get the Home Depot house brand with the lifetime warranty.  Used to get Craftsman, but I'm not sure Sears has much of a lifetime left.  Well, except for this, love my 10 ways.  They don't last a lifetime, though - people steal them.  Only screwdrivers I've ever had stolen.

But for the little stuff, I love my Wihas.  I still wear them out in 3-4 years, but that's a lot better than the cheap stuff.

And I'll absolutely buy used tools sometimes, when I run into a good deal on a good tool.
 
2014-04-07 12:43:04 AM  
I have purchased a few used tools. I bought an awesome old pipe wrench at the Habitat Re-Store. I would guess it was made in the19teens - 1920's..That thing will last forever, it's owners are just
passing through it's world. Most tools, if well kept, and used for their intended purposes,can last lifetimes.
 
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