If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Yahoo)   Five things you should always buy used. Sorry, Pervy McPervyson, but panties aren't on the list   (finance.yahoo.com) divider line 176
    More: Obvious, Pervy McPervyson, designer labels, exercise equipment  
•       •       •

15763 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Apr 2014 at 6:47 PM (28 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



176 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-04-06 07:22:04 PM  
The car thing... ymmv.  I've never bought a new vehicle... nobody in my immediate family has bought a new car since Carter was president.

But, I can do the math.  If you're looking at, for possibly the most clear example, a Tacoma, which lots try to sell for $17-18k with over 100,000 miles and 7-8 years old... buying a new one for $30k with below-market-rate financing would be tempting.
 
2014-04-06 07:22:19 PM  
Actually with computers I have been pushing the Intel NUCs, they are incredible for a light-weight desktop.  The I3 model is about $500 after buying it some ram, an mSSD and its power cord (farking hell, they don't include the PSU->wall portion of the power cord...dicks).  My reasoning is longer term savings and over all coolness of the little thing.

The cool:
Its a tiny little rectangle that's packing laptop caliber parts.
It can boot to windows in under 10 seconds.
You pick the ram & storage capacity depending on need.

The practical:
The power consumption is next to nothing, 11w idle and 22w doing something 'strenuous' like HD netflix playback or even light gaming.  Over the course of five years it'll cost me $56 to run one 24/7, vs $850 to run a clunker old Pentium 4 or core2duo desktop for the same its a savings in itself even if the desktop was given for free.

I've been a big fan since buying one for a proper can-do-anything media PC for the living room TV, great little machines.

/I am not an Intel shill I swear
//best thing in computing since the SSD in my opinion
 
2014-04-06 07:22:27 PM  

Ambivalence


The use of "Fraction" implies a significant savings that does not exist.


According to KBB.com:

new 2014 Audi A4 Premium w/ AWD and automatic: ~$34,000

2011 Audi A4 w/ AWD and automatic, 45K miles: ~$24,000 (from a dealer)

A 30% reduction in price is not "significant"?
 
2014-04-06 07:22:28 PM  

insertsnarkyusername: Prostitutes, the brand new ones are way more expensive.


Wrong thread, this one is about 'second-hand purchases' rather than 'hiring'.
/if it flies, floats or farks...
 
2014-04-06 07:22:49 PM  
Why isn't "house" on the list?  You ever been through the shiat of building a house from the ground up?  Average build time in the last place I lived was 2 years thanks to the slowest county bureaucracy on earth and the small number of builders.

Cars depend on the market.  I wanted to buy a small car when gas was $5/gallon.  I was actually upsizing from motorcycles, not downsizing from an SUV.  Anyway, due to demand, the cost of 1-3 year old compacts was only a few hundred less than the cost of brand new.  So I bought a new car.  On the flip side, if I'd been in the market for an SUV, I could have had one with under 10k miles for 1/4-1/3 of the original sticker price because morons are bad at math.
 
2014-04-06 07:23:01 PM  

shtychkn: And what makes one flat head different then another flat head?


Smaller ones - bendy corners.
Larger ones - the shaft may disengage from the handle. shiatty metals will corrode more quickly. If you decide to misuse your screwdriver as a prying device, cheap ones will snap off under a surprisingly small amount of pressure.
 
2014-04-06 07:23:23 PM  

Danbogator: I bought my last used vehicle off of craigslist for $800 and it lasted me over 10,000 miles. A/C and windows all worked, as well as the radio. I don't see the sense in spending thousands upon thousands on vehicles when you're only using it to get you back and forth to work.


only 10,000 miles?
 
2014-04-06 07:24:33 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: Ambivalence

The use of "Fraction" implies a significant savings that does not exist.


According to KBB.com:

new 2014 Audi A4 Premium w/ AWD and automatic: ~$34,000

2011 Audi A4 w/ AWD and automatic, 45K miles: ~$24,000 (from a dealer)

A 30% reduction in price is not "significant"?


You don't compare against current year model but against "original sticker price".  How much did that vehicle cost in 2011?
 
2014-04-06 07:28:23 PM  

Jim_Callahan: Ambivalence: Marcus Aurelius: Buy all your tools new and do not skimp on them in any way.  Buy the best and it will last a lifetime.

Cars, on the other hand, are disposable.  A check for $25k will get you a nice 3 year old ride you can beat the ever loving crap out of, and then get a new one five years later.

Jesus, who in the hell pays $25k for a car?  Not a truck or an SUV, mind you, a car.

Yeah, even NEW cars only run like 17k - 24k if you're buying a basic "gets you from A to B" vehicle or a light-duty truck.

If you're paying much more than 10 or maybe 12 for a used vehicle you're getting ripped off.


Life's too short to buy basic.

Snag a 4 year old Mercedes or Audi off lease for the price of a 2 year old Accord. You won't go back.

As for trucks and SUVs...find a nice 8-10 year old one bought to "safely haul" the now grown kids to and from school...Helicopter parents take very good care of their cars. A 10 year old GMC Denali can be had for under $14K.
 
2014-04-06 07:28:30 PM  

TheTurtle: skinink: I think people can buy used computers that have been wiped and from offices that have upgraded computers. I think the majority of people do not need to splurge money on the latest and greatest if they only do basic things with their computers (web surf, email, moderate picture editing, streaming video, games that do not need the best CPU and GPU). There's no reason to spend on a new computer. Most people have slow computers because they don't do basic maintenance on their computers so it gets cluttered up and slow.

...but anything over about three years old is basically worthless, except Apple, in which case it's maybe six years.  Friends call me and ask if I need their old 2003 Windows XP desktop with a monster power-wasting 15" CRT and a whopping 120Gb hard drive, and I tell them, no, my phone is probably more powerful.

Place I used to work (large federal), used to put all their retired desktops on pallets and give them to churches and schools, until the churches and schools started telling us, "we already have Pentium IIs, why the fark do we want your old 286es?"  They all went to landfills after that.


Bull. A computer from 2011 is worthless? I'm confused by your worthless remark being followed by a story about Pentium 2's. And computer from 2011 is going to be a Windows 7 with most like a dual core processor minimum and should have 4GB memory and a decent size hard drive. And even if it's on board graphics and sound, that should handle the majority of things needed to do.

Unless you're doing heavy media editing, compiling, playing games requiring top line components, then a computer from 2011 properly configured should be viable. What has changed in the three years since that would make a computer worthless?
 
2014-04-06 07:30:25 PM  
If you think screwdrivers are the same...recall the last time you stripped the head trying to get a rusty screw out...Those were brand name Chinese stamped screwdrivers - I'm looking at you Craftsman. Buy American and get a much better product that will last a lifetime...like the OLD Craftsman tools.
 
2014-04-06 07:30:38 PM  

theMagni: I've got a pair of wirestrippers that was about $35.  If you use them once, I promise you'll go out and get a pair that day.


Rewired my entire house with these, still as sharp as the day I bought them.
 
2014-04-06 07:31:31 PM  

Ambivalence: Marcus Aurelius: Buy all your tools new and do not skimp on them in any way.  Buy the best and it will last a lifetime.

Cars, on the other hand, are disposable.  A check for $25k will get you a nice 3 year old ride you can beat the ever loving crap out of, and then get a new one five years later.

Jesus, who in the hell pays $25k for a car?  Not a truck or an SUV, mind you, a car.


Someone that doesn't want a I-4 golfcart.
 
2014-04-06 07:32:03 PM  

Ambivalence: I am going to disagree on the cars.  Used cars are not "a fraction of its original sticker price" at 2-3 years of age, not if they're any good.  I buy new cars from quality manufacturers and I drive it for 10 years or more until I am literally sick of dealing with whatever issues arise. MY car.  MY butt groove on the seat.  broken in to MY driving style.


I'm going to disagree with your disagreement. Quality cars, in particular, should be bought used. There are large numbers of 2-3 year old lease returns available at the manufacturer's dealership. The key is to deal with the brand's dealer and not one of the used-car mega stores. Manufacturers retain the best lease returns for themselves and sell them as certified pre-owned, the rest go on to those mega-stores. In fact, my M-B dealer has a large showroom with only lease-returns. Every one of them is a car that they leased out when new and which they serviced themselves throughout its short life. They're not exactly giving them away, but the deals are very good.

My 2009 R320 BlueTec with less than 60000km was just over half the price of a new one when I bought it in 2012. And that's with an additional 3 year 80000km warranty.
 
2014-04-06 07:32:18 PM  

Ambivalence: Englebert Slaptyback: Ambivalence

The use of "Fraction" implies a significant savings that does not exist.


According to KBB.com:

new 2014 Audi A4 Premium w/ AWD and automatic: ~$34,000

2011 Audi A4 w/ AWD and automatic, 45K miles: ~$24,000 (from a dealer)

A 30% reduction in price is not "significant"?

You don't compare against current year model but against "original sticker price".  How much did that vehicle cost in 2011?


My current summer car was 50 to 55K off the lot, I bought a used lease back 2 years old for 30K.
 
2014-04-06 07:34:10 PM  
You tool queens seem to have missed a point. Buy your quality used, if you can. But if you value your time the difference in price might be nil. That's why Snap-On comes to your door.

Of course, in some cases antiques work. Block planes, verneer gauges (provided you can read them). I have a century old Starett micrometer that still works. And I love slide rules and other old things like that. I had to refrain from buying a Gilson on ebay after discovering them in the back of a 1924 PopMech.
 
2014-04-06 07:34:34 PM  
A fraction of its original sticker price?  Well, technically 9/10 is indeed a fraction.

Both of the last two cars I purchased were after substantial amounts of research on price, quality, and features of the cars.  In every single case, every potential car I looked at that was within a few years old and was under 50k miles (and wasn't a rust bucket that's been totally beat to hell), there was a negligible price difference between that car and a new one.  I can spend $16500 on the used car that's two years old with 35k miles on it, or $18k on a brand new one with full factory warranty.  Its ridiculous.

The author is bad and he should feel bad.
 
2014-04-06 07:34:43 PM  
Agree on the car.  I've never paid over 5k for a car - and I don't want a car payment.  I have a great Chevy Lumina that I have had for nearly 10 years (1994 - so I got it used) and it still runs great at 200k miles.  It has had some work done - sure - but I get nearly 30mpg and I haven't had a car payment in ages.  I have maybe put the same money into it that I paid for it.  When then engine or tranny goes - it will be time to move on.


Disagree on tools. Buy good tools once and keep them for life.  I suppose if you are some city person who never  does work at home you can skimp.  The last thing you want to do is have a tool break on you when you need it.  Most people don't need much other than a few hand tools, a socket set and a band saw to get by; just get good ones.
 
2014-04-06 07:35:09 PM  

TheTurtle: skinink: I think people can buy used computers that have been wiped and from offices that have upgraded computers. I think the majority of people do not need to splurge money on the latest and greatest if they only do basic things with their computers (web surf, email, moderate picture editing, streaming video, games that do not need the best CPU and GPU). There's no reason to spend on a new computer. Most people have slow computers because they don't do basic maintenance on their computers so it gets cluttered up and slow.

...but anything over about three years old is basically worthless, except Apple, in which case it's maybe six years.Friends call me and ask if I need their old 2003 Windows XP desktop with a monster power-wasting 15" CRT and a whopping 120Gb hard drive, and I tell them, no, my phone is probably more powerful.

Place I used to work (large federal), used to put all their retired desktops on pallets and give them to churches and schools, until the churches and schools started telling us, "we already have Pentium IIs, why the fark do we want your old 286es?"  They all went to landfills after that.


Well that's a load of horseshiat, especially where a person is going to use the computer for the equivalent of light office work. Anything sold within the last 6-8 years is probably going to be fine. I have a perfectly functional T61 Thinkpad from 2007. I had a Dell Optiplex 620 from 2005 and only got rid of it when some capacitors on the mother board died. My parents use an Optiplex 745 SFF frmo 2008.
 
2014-04-06 07:35:28 PM  
No pictures of used panties yet? Fark, you slippin'!

Just no period panties, mmmkay?
 
2014-04-06 07:35:49 PM  
I check out the local thrift shops for tools and other stuff once a week.
In the last month I got two quality screwdrivers, klein wire strippers and 4 very good german chisels for a dollar a piece.
The chisels were very dull, the screwdrivers a little rusty and the kleins were stiff.
Sharpened the chisels, wd-40 and some steel wool on the screwdrivers and kleins.
Someone did not know what they were getting rid of with those chisels.

I have gone over a month without finding anything worth buying too.
 
2014-04-06 07:38:12 PM  

Baryogenesis: Jim_Callahan: Ambivalence: Marcus Aurelius: Buy all your tools new and do not skimp on them in any way.  Buy the best and it will last a lifetime.

Cars, on the other hand, are disposable.  A check for $25k will get you a nice 3 year old ride you can beat the ever loving crap out of, and then get a new one five years later.

Jesus, who in the hell pays $25k for a car?  Not a truck or an SUV, mind you, a car.

Yeah, even NEW cars only run like 17k - 24k if you're buying a basic "gets you from A to B" vehicle or a light-duty truck.

If you're paying much more than 10 or maybe 12 for a used vehicle you're getting ripped off.

That's essentially the thought that crossed my mind the last time I bought a car.  15 grand for a 5 year old car with 100k miles on it?  No thanks.  There must have been something wrong with the used car market at the time.


Remember "Cash for Clunkers"? The federal government spent 3 billion dollars to drive up the price of used cars and boost the sales of new cars encourage people to buy newer, more efficient cars, while sending older, less efficient cars to recycling.
 
2014-04-06 07:40:23 PM  

Pathman: i'm no mechanic but as an active DIY'er i would say that one thing i've learned is that some tools are worth skimping on and some simply aren't...
i don't own snap-on tools because i can't afford them but i did buy a nice set of craftsman sockets (reg and impact) and both were great investments that saved me money and headache down the road.

however this entire discussion was precipitated by <b>baka-san</b>'s comment that is entirely true.  a screwdriver is not just a screwdriver.  whether you find it worth spending the money on a nice brand is up to you but i think a nice set of screwdivers makes all the difference from all the crappy ones you have in your toolbox.
same goes for quality drill bits.

i also like buying good saw blades....

i mean really, the more i think about it - like anything - you often get what you pay for.  and like anything, worth and value are subjective.


While remodeling my kitchen I was cutting out the old floor, 1 layer or 3/4" pine, 1 layer or 3/4 tongue and grove oak and about 3 layers of linoleum on top of that. I burned out my good saw blade in minutes so I bought the cheapest thing Lowes had, which was this $6 blade. Not only did it finish the job, but I'm still using it to this day.

Sometimes spending the extra money doesn't always get you the best product.
 
2014-04-06 07:45:04 PM  
If you have to finance a vehicle purchase, buying new can easily make good sense between 0% financing deals and factory rebates. Used car finance rates are ridiculous.
 
2014-04-06 07:47:59 PM  

The_Original_Roxtar: Barfmaker: TinyFist: " A screwdriver is a screwdriver. It's simple and no single one is really better than the other."

I will stab the author in the dick with one of my Klein flatheads or one of my Wiha's.

I'm not even joking.

Oh get off it, MOST people have no need for specialized or expensive tools. You do, that's great but you can't possibly think that it's anywhere near common.

I was a carpenter for many years and I have no idea what those brands are...sounds a tad hipsterish to me.

it's not "specialized" or "expensive". it's cast bullshiat vs forged tools.
I've bent so many cheap-ass screwdrivers, it's really not worth buying the cheap ones.


I'm just an amateur when it comes to tools, but my father was a machinist and I still have many of his tools, some going back to the start of his career in Europe in the early 50s. Even I can tell there is a big difference between a screwdriver that very nearly fits a screw head and one that fits it perfectly. The difference is even greater when working with sockets. There is also the intangible satisfaction that comes with using quality tools that work perfectly.
 
2014-04-06 07:48:59 PM  
The_Original_Roxtar:
enjoy your plebemobile.

many of us like cars and see them as more than simple transit.


And many of us realize there are more productive ways to get status and breeding rights. We aren't racing. We aren't driving off-road. All we care about is an economical, safe way of getting from one place to another.

Of course, if you need a penis extension by all means spend an extra fifty thousand on it.
 
2014-04-06 07:49:57 PM  
I buy the best tools that I can afford.

I still can't do for shiat with them, but they seem fly better when I throw them across the room in frustration.
 
2014-04-06 07:53:26 PM  

Bourbonman: Baryogenesis: Jim_Callahan: Ambivalence: Marcus Aurelius: Buy all your tools new and do not skimp on them in any way.  Buy the best and it will last a lifetime.

Cars, on the other hand, are disposable.  A check for $25k will get you a nice 3 year old ride you can beat the ever loving crap out of, and then get a new one five years later.

Jesus, who in the hell pays $25k for a car?  Not a truck or an SUV, mind you, a car.

Yeah, even NEW cars only run like 17k - 24k if you're buying a basic "gets you from A to B" vehicle or a light-duty truck.

If you're paying much more than 10 or maybe 12 for a used vehicle you're getting ripped off.

That's essentially the thought that crossed my mind the last time I bought a car.  15 grand for a 5 year old car with 100k miles on it?  No thanks.  There must have been something wrong with the used car market at the time.

Remember "Cash for Clunkers"? The federal government spent 3 billion dollars to drive up the price of used cars and boost the sales of new cars encourage people to buy newer, more efficient cars, while sending older, less efficient cars to recycling.



That only took ~750,000 cars off the road. What caused the decrease in used cars was car sales going from 16 million to 9 million when the housing bubble blew up Wall Street.  That was 7 million new cars of which most buyers would have traded in a used car for.

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-04-06 07:56:07 PM  

Ray Vaughn: If you think screwdrivers are the same...recall the last time you stripped the head trying to get a rusty screw out...Those were brand name Chinese stamped screwdrivers - I'm looking at you Craftsman. Buy American and get a much better product that will last a lifetime...like the OLD Craftsman tools.


I bought this set from Harbor Freight about 12 years ago and with the exception of the few I've lost in that time, the rest are still in great shape. There's not a week that goes by that I'm not doing some kind of car or home repair either.
 
2014-04-06 07:56:09 PM  

Bourbonman: Remember "Cash for Clunkers"? The federal government spent 3 billion dollars to drive up the price of used cars and boost the sales of new cars encourage people to buy newer, more efficient cars, while sending older, less efficient cars to recycling.


You're blaming high used prices on cash for clunkers? Seriously?

That program took out a moderate chunk of early/mid nineties SUVs and trucks. So if you're shopping around for a 1994 Ford Explorer with the old box frame and 200,000 miles, then yes, you would sh** out of luck.

High prices are based off of pent up demand and a social reluctance to add more debt due to employment uncertainty. Better to risk a big repair and get "just one more year" out of the used vehicle than to commit to 300-500 dollars a month of payments. Apply that to people wanting new vehicles but not wanting that price, and all the off-lease and gently used get snatched up. Cash for Clunkers worked but its affects are long passed unless you absolutely need a 20 year old beater to screw around on deer trails with.
 
2014-04-06 07:57:54 PM  
I went and Googled for the used price of a Tesla S-Model.  Thinking maybe I could find one in the $40,000 range.

Used S-Models are going for more money than new ones.
 
2014-04-06 07:59:12 PM  
Most of my tools are Snap on and craftsman I got at yard sales and Goodwill.
Dirt cheap and if one breaks I get a free replacement.  :-)
 
2014-04-06 08:02:21 PM  

ReapTheChaos: While remodeling my kitchen I was cutting out the old floor, 1 layer or 3/4" pine, 1 layer or 3/4 tongue and grove oak and about 3 layers of linoleum on top of that. I burned out my good saw blade in minutes so I bought the cheapest thing Lowes had, which was this $6 blade. Not only did it finish the job, but I'm still using it to this day.

Sometimes spending the extra money doesn't always get you the best product.


yeah - there are always exceptions.  maybe you were using the wrong blade to begin with?  maybe you got lucky?
i have no idea, not a carpenter.
but i think my point should be pretty self evident :-)
I put a freud blade on my table and circular saws and it cuts through wood like butter.  the stock crappy blades that came with both and the $6 blades from HD have always done the job, but the quality blade makes things MUCH easier in my experience. of course but then i have to spend $50 for those blades as opposed to just using a cheap one.
 
2014-04-06 08:05:13 PM  
Cars:
Buying a used car will save you a lot of money and the difference in quality of the resulting ride is fairly negligible, provided it's not too old.


Only if you don't mind the lack of choice in options or warranty coverage.
 
2014-04-06 08:05:49 PM  
Picked up a 97 Honda Accord with 80k miles for $3k.  Paid cash.  Still feel pretty good about that one.  Been driving it for about a year and a half now.  Brakes, Rotors and 12k service will be ~$600.
 
gja [TotalFark]
2014-04-06 08:06:47 PM  

Barfmaker: TinyFist: " A screwdriver is a screwdriver. It's simple and no single one is really better than the other."

I will stab the author in the dick with one of my Klein flatheads or one of my Wiha's.

I'm not even joking.

Oh get off it, MOST people have no need for specialized or expensive tools. You do, that's great but you can't possibly think that it's anywhere near common.

I was a carpenter for many years and I have no idea what those brands are...sounds a tad hipsterish to me.


Touch my Snap-on chest and I will shove a pointy-barbed stick so far up your arse you won't need a toothpick.
 
2014-04-06 08:08:52 PM  

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: That program took out a moderate chunk of early/mid nineties SUVs and trucks. So if you're shopping around for a 1994 Ford Explorer with the old box frame and 200,000 miles, then yes, you would sh** out of luck.


Which, strangely, for being the #1 vehicle taken by Cash 4 Clunkers by a mile,  still remained and remain dirt-ass-cheap on the used market.
 
2014-04-06 08:10:01 PM  

shtychkn: And what makes one flat head different then another flat head?


For regular usage, the amount of torque you can put on one before it snaps or bends.

Most people's needs aren't going to be a lot of torque needed, unless you're disassembling something old.(ie rusted or otherwise seized into place[threadlocker, or something damaged that sees a lot of wear and tear].)...or purely over torqued.

For irregular usage, a lot of morons use them for chisels, punches, can openers, and pry bars(etc).  Of course these nimwits are going to find that the "cheap" one's "just don't hold up".  If they were smart enough to use the right tool for the job even a lot of cheaper tools would last longer.

Furthermore, every gritty and dirty mechanic has the potential to be snooty and hipster-ish over what he uses in comparison to his co-workers.  A fedora wearing hipster has his iProduct, a black fingered mechanic has his snap-on or otherwise expensive fetish.

Craftsman, over all for hand-tools has my vote over some of the other really cheap vendors, has the added benefit of lifetime replacement for hand tools that are broken.(or something along those lines at any rate).  So you some-what buy quality(because they don't want to be replacing them, they make them well), and insurance in case you do have problems down the road.(which are less common for things like wrenches and such than you'd think, again, unless someone is an idiot and uses the tools improperly).
 
NFA [TotalFark]
2014-04-06 08:15:57 PM  

Ambivalence: I am going to disagree on the cars.  Used cars are not "a fraction of its original sticker price" at 2-3 years of age, not if they're any good.  I buy new cars from quality manufacturers and I drive it for 10 years or more until I am literally sick of dealing with whatever issues arise. MY car.  MY butt groove on the seat.  broken in to MY driving style.


THIS

In fact with pickup trucks the used price is so close to the new price that considering you'll pay a higher interest rate on a used vehicle loan, you pay the same or even more for a used vehicle.

A coworker spent quite a bit of time trying to buy a used truck.  He gave up and bought one 1000 miles away.  Flew there, drove it home and saved a crap load o money.
 
2014-04-06 08:21:08 PM  

skinink: TheTurtle: skinink: I think people can buy used computers that have been wiped and from offices that have upgraded computers. I think the majority of people do not need to splurge money on the latest and greatest if they only do basic things with their computers (web surf, email, moderate picture editing, streaming video, games that do not need the best CPU and GPU). There's no reason to spend on a new computer. Most people have slow computers because they don't do basic maintenance on their computers so it gets cluttered up and slow.

...but anything over about three years old is basically worthless, except Apple, in which case it's maybe six years.  Friends call me and ask if I need their old 2003 Windows XP desktop with a monster power-wasting 15" CRT and a whopping 120Gb hard drive, and I tell them, no, my phone is probably more powerful.

Place I used to work (large federal), used to put all their retired desktops on pallets and give them to churches and schools, until the churches and schools started telling us, "we already have Pentium IIs, why the fark do we want your old 286es?"  They all went to landfills after that.

Bull. A computer from 2011 is worthless? I'm confused by your worthless remark being followed by a story about Pentium 2's. And computer from 2011 is going to be a Windows 7 with most like a dual core processor minimum and should have 4GB memory and a decent size hard drive. And even if it's on board graphics and sound, that should handle the majority of things needed to do.

Unless you're doing heavy media editing, compiling, playing games requiring top line components, then a computer from 2011 properly configured should be viable. What has changed in the three years since that would make a computer worthless?


Over the last three years? Not much at all; advancements seems to be finally hitting a plateau. It's refreshing after the last few decades of purchasing products that were practically obsolete off the shelf. Built my current PC in Jan, 2012 and so far have only added an SSD and a new video card.
 
2014-04-06 08:24:18 PM  

Ambivalence


You don't compare against current year model but against "original sticker price". How much did that vehicle cost in 2011?


We're talking about new vs used and how a used car is significantly cheaper than a new car. Unless you're prepared to time travel to buy a new 2011, its sticker price doesn't matter.

Be sure to lift with your legs so you don't hurt yourself moving the goalposts around.
 
2014-04-06 08:32:05 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Rewired my entire house with these, still as sharp as the day I bought them.


Then you should put them on ebay because a miracle transcending physics has occurred.

/i keed
//well, not about the physics
 
2014-04-06 08:32:55 PM  
I use hand tools every day for my job. I've broken quite a few screwdrivers in my time. I run into a lot of slotted screws that require quite a lot of torque to break loose. The only problem is the slot is quite narrow. Finding a screwdriver whose tip is thin enough but strong enough was a challenge. I found one at True Value that was an American Made brand that I'd never heard of. It is absolutely the strongest blade I've ever seen on a screwdriver. The blade is about 1/4" wide and about 1/32' thick, but yet can stand up to screws that require torques that only mechanics and bodybuilders can produce. I've snapped the tips off of similarly sized Craftsman and Snap-On screwdrivers.
Others here have mentioned Wiha tools. I've used plenty of their small specialty tools and they are very high quality.
 
2014-04-06 08:33:33 PM  
Why weren't Ukranian brides on the list?
 
2014-04-06 08:34:56 PM  

Barfmaker: TinyFist: " A screwdriver is a screwdriver. It's simple and no single one is really better than the other."

I will stab the author in the dick with one of my Klein flatheads or one of my Wiha's.

I'm not even joking.

Oh get off it, MOST people have no need for specialized or expensive tools. You do, that's great but you can't possibly think that it's anywhere near common.

I was a carpenter for many years and I have no idea what those brands are...sounds a tad hipsterish to me.


Well, Jesus.
 
2014-04-06 08:36:35 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: Buy all your tools new and do not skimp on them in any way.  Buy the best and it will last a lifetime.


Yep. Tools are one of the things where brand matters. There are a few things I'll buy no-name from Harbor freight, but the rest of the time, I search out brands with good reputations and good warranties.
 
2014-04-06 08:36:47 PM  

anuran: The_Original_Roxtar:
enjoy your plebemobile.

many of us like cars and see them as more than simple transit.

And many of us realize there are more productive ways to get status and breeding rights. We aren't racing. We aren't driving off-road. All we care about is an economical, safe way of getting from one place to another.

Of course, if you need a penis extension by all means spend an extra fifty thousand on it.


it always comes down to the implied sexual insecurity with you guys. My vehicles have nothing to do with sex.

My motorcycle is more economical and a lot faster than your shiatmobile elantra.
My project 944 cost me less than $2k and is a blast to drive through the mountains or the race track.
My 3-series has a great balance of reliability, cost, and efficiency to make it a great daily.

yes, all you care about is an economical, safe a-b transportation appliance. why don't you ride the bus? I like cars... and so (like any other hobby) I'm content to spend a few dollars extra to get something nice.
We all have hobbies... surely there is something you spend unnecessary money on for the pure enjoyment of it. if not, why you so poor bro?
 
2014-04-06 08:37:17 PM  

TheTurtle: skinink: I think people can buy used computers that have been wiped and from offices that have upgraded computers. I think the majority of people do not need to splurge money on the latest and greatest if they only do basic things with their computers (web surf, email, moderate picture editing, streaming video, games that do not need the best CPU and GPU). There's no reason to spend on a new computer. Most people have slow computers because they don't do basic maintenance on their computers so it gets cluttered up and slow.

...but anything over about three years old is basically worthless, except Apple, in which case it's maybe six years.  Friends call me and ask if I need their old 2003 Windows XP desktop with a monster power-wasting 15" CRT and a whopping 120Gb hard drive, and I tell them, no, my phone is probably more powerful.

Place I used to work (large federal), used to put all their retired desktops on pallets and give them to churches and schools, until the churches and schools started telling us, "we already have Pentium IIs, why the fark do we want your old 286es?"  They all went to landfills after that.



PCs, as long as they are not made by Apple, are so easy and cheap to upgrade that I kept my last PC for ten years, upgrading the hard drive every couple of years as prices fell like a stone. Even the new mobo and Core2duo chip a few years ago only cost me about $200 and was easy to install. Good as new decent sized LCD monitors are incredibly cheap on ebay, I got two HP 19 inch monitors in perfect condition for well under $100.

Long term PCs work out far cheaper than Macs and far easier to upgrade. Those PCs they were sending to landfill I could, if I needed a new PC, upgrade into a decent machine for far less then the cost of buying one new. And since I upgraded to Windows 8 from XP when MS were offering the upgrade for $40 I have an OS that runs great even if you have less power and memory.

I'd never buy a PC new. Since I have to upgrade the video card to run multi monitors anyway I might as well upgrade anything else that's needed and get a machine that is exactly what I want.
 
2014-04-06 08:38:46 PM  

BumpInTheNight: Actually with computers I have been pushing the Intel NUCs, they are incredible for a light-weight desktop.  The I3 model is about $500 after buying it some ram, an mSSD and its power cord (farking hell, they don't include the PSU->wall portion of the power cord...dicks).  My reasoning is longer term savings and over all coolness of the little thing.

The cool:
Its a tiny little rectangle that's packing laptop caliber parts.
It can boot to windows in under 10 seconds.
You pick the ram & storage capacity depending on need.

The practical:
The power consumption is next to nothing, 11w idle and 22w doing something 'strenuous' like HD netflix playback or even light gaming.  Over the course of five years it'll cost me $56 to run one 24/7, vs $850 to run a clunker old Pentium 4 or core2duo desktop for the same its a savings in itself even if the desktop was given for free.

I've been a big fan since buying one for a proper can-do-anything media PC for the living room TV, great little machines.

/I am not an Intel shill I swear
//best thing in computing since the SSD in my opinion


--
hm - thanks for the idea
 
2014-04-06 08:42:36 PM  

addy2: This has all the earmarks of an enjoyable thread. Will get the popcorn.


I recommend not buying used.
 
Displayed 50 of 176 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report