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(Slate)   A look at why certain regions have developed incorrect dialects that allow them to say words with unstressed syllables, like "Probly"   (slate.com) divider line 130
    More: Sick, stressed syllable, English Words, forms, Ly the Fairy  
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12367 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Apr 2014 at 6:28 PM (28 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



130 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-04-06 05:18:58 PM  
Do You Ever Say Probly Instead of Probably? Here's Why.

Probly because I was drunk.
 
2014-04-06 05:20:59 PM  
Other examples of modern pronunciations that came from haplology are pacifist, which used to be pacificist; and humbly, which used to be humblely.

Now if we could just get people to stop saying/typing "orientate".
 
2014-04-06 05:33:30 PM  
Ya'll figure this out, am fix'n to git sumthin to eat
 
2014-04-06 05:44:26 PM  
You mean 'prolly'?

You deserve a kick in the nuts for that one.
 
2014-04-06 05:48:53 PM  
What's fun, is that in the future, folks will look at these words and wonder, "Why in chocolate covered f*ck is it spelled like that when it's pronounced like this?"

Yes, I'm looking at you "knight" and "thought" and "knead" and let us not speak of what the French and the folks who lurve to Latinate the language have done to our spelling habits...
 
2014-04-06 05:52:31 PM  

Demetrius: You mean 'prolly'?

You deserve a kick in the nuts for that one.


It's most prolly and it's perfectly cromulent in many parts of the country.
 
2014-04-06 06:19:33 PM  

hubiestubert: What's fun, is that in the future, folks will look at these words and wonder, "Why in chocolate covered f*ck is it spelled like that when it's pronounced like this?"

Yes, I'm looking at you "knight" and "thought" and "knead" and let us not speak of what the French and the folks who lurve to Latinate the language have done to our spelling habits...


Chihuahua.

I rest my case.
 
2014-04-06 06:33:57 PM  
I hear the even shorter 'pry' when around my family. Perhaps it is the Pennsylvania Dutch?
 
2014-04-06 06:34:36 PM  
Just be sure to recycle your aluminium.
 
2014-04-06 06:36:36 PM  
I seen this topic before.
 
2014-04-06 06:37:05 PM  
Only a someone that's wicked retahded randomly drawps whole syllables.
 
2014-04-06 06:38:29 PM  
You mean it isn't caused by hoodies and saggy pants?
 
2014-04-06 06:39:49 PM  

Barfmaker: hubiestubert: What's fun, is that in the future, folks will look at these words and wonder, "Why in chocolate covered f*ck is it spelled like that when it's pronounced like this?"

Yes, I'm looking at you "knight" and "thought" and "knead" and let us not speak of what the French and the folks who lurve to Latinate the language have done to our spelling habits...

Chihuahua.

I rest my case.


You mean, CHY CHY rod RIG ez and his CHIH HOOA HOOA?
 
2014-04-06 06:41:15 PM  
That was a great article on haplogy.
 
2014-04-06 06:41:22 PM  
It is mostly hubris to think that there are "incorrect" dialects.  Whatever gets your meaning across most effectively is correct.

Language has always been used to define social class, but whatever language and dialect anyone speaks, there is someone somewhere who looks down on you for it.
 
2014-04-06 06:42:57 PM  
Wow,  Subby,you managed to fark up every aspect of that headline. Good work!
 
2014-04-06 06:48:47 PM  
Ever read stuff from before the invention of spelling? You have to read most of it aloud to figure what the word were, or at least move your lips. The first scholar who could read without moving their lips was considered a weirdo.
 
2014-04-06 06:49:02 PM  
I blame the Brits. I mean, how do you get 'worstersheer' out of Worcestershire, 'lester' out of Leicester, and worst of all all, 'fanshaw' out of Fetherstonhaugh?
 
2014-04-06 06:53:35 PM  
Incorrect according to who[m]?
 
2014-04-06 06:54:12 PM  

Peter von Nostrand: Ya'll figure this out, am fix'n to git sumthin to eat


Probly you meant "Ah'm fixin to git me sumthin to eat". Learn the language.
 
2014-04-06 06:57:12 PM  
Then there is a napron which became an apron and a norange which became an orange. Our language is fluid and more interesting because of it.
 
2014-04-06 06:58:14 PM  

hubiestubert: What's fun, is that in the future, folks will look at these words and wonder, "Why in chocolate covered f*ck is it spelled like that when it's pronounced like this?"

Yes, I'm looking at you "knight" and "thought" and "knead" and let us not speak of what the French and the folks who lurve to Latinate the language have done to our spelling habits...


the silent k helps distinguish those words from synonyms. what is your problem with 'thought'?

if you want it to be spelled 'thawt', i must insist upon calling you a 13 year old girl (which should be belittling to a man of your age and intelligence)
 
2014-04-06 06:59:51 PM  
homonyms* derp
 
2014-04-06 06:59:59 PM  
Good thing they never do this in Frisco.
 
2014-04-06 07:01:00 PM  
Does this linguistic phenomenon make you all uncomfterble?
 
2014-04-06 07:03:07 PM  
'S

Kamekoozie: Ya'll figure this out, am fix'n to git sumthin to eat


Sgweet then!
Howzyer Meemarandem?
 
2014-04-06 07:05:00 PM  

Demetrius: You mean 'prolly'?

You deserve a kick in the nuts for that one.


I see my job is done here.
 
2014-04-06 07:06:52 PM  

Kamekoozie: Peter von Nostrand: Ya'll figure this out, am fix'n to git sumthin to eat

Probly you meant "Ah'm fixin to git me sumthin to eat". Learn the language.


It's fi'nah, damn it!  Fi'nah!  "Ah'm fi'nah git me sum-mah eat."

/grits n aigs?
 
2014-04-06 07:10:42 PM  
I read this article in the liberry last Febuary.
 
2014-04-06 07:11:45 PM  
I still believe that the English language needs a passive-form informal collective pronoun. I nominate "y'all" because I use it.

You for the singular. Y'all for the collective.
 
2014-04-06 07:11:46 PM  
That's racialist!
 
2014-04-06 07:13:16 PM  

puckrock2000: I read this article in the liberry last Febuary.


On a Wendsday?
 
2014-04-06 07:15:00 PM  

cyberspacedout: Does this linguistic phenomenon phenomenum make you all uncomfterble?


FarkedTFY
 
2014-04-06 07:16:28 PM  
Joey, are you going to the movies on Sunday?

Supposably
 
2014-04-06 07:19:50 PM  

ko_kyi: It is mostly hubris to think that there are "incorrect" dialects.  Whatever gets your meaning across most effectively is correct.

Language has always been used to define social class, but whatever language and dialect anyone speaks, there is someone somewhere who looks down on you for it.


And if I can't understand someone's slab-tongued backwoods gabbling, they're not getting their meaning across effectively.
 
2014-04-06 07:21:24 PM  
What about loging the infinitive?

"The car needs washed."

instead of:

"The car needs to be washed."

I find this annoying. :|
 
2014-04-06 07:22:03 PM  

Walt_Jizzney: What about loging the infinitive?

"The car needs washed."

instead of:

"The car needs to be washed."

I find this annoying. :|


Damnit, I mean 'losing" the infinitive!

Preview, self!!!!
 
2014-04-06 07:25:03 PM  
Probly isn't a word.  The correct pronunciation, with all syllables, is "prolly"

Next up:  The vanishing 'T'

Mou'ains.  Ki'ens.  Isaac New'on.
 
2014-04-06 07:33:12 PM  

fusillade762: Do You Ever Say Probly Instead of Probably? Here's Why.

Probly because I was drunk.


I'm absolutely certain I've never said "probly" ever in my life. "Probly" just makes you sound lazy and/or uneducated.  Sort of like the people who pronounce "picture" the same way as "pitcher."
 
2014-04-06 07:33:51 PM  
Probably = Prolly in blackanese where I live, no "b" required at all. Most people I know are capable of saying the whole word, but rarely do.

My new old fashioned saying is "init" for 'Isn't it,' which actually is a misplaced contraction for the phrase, 'Is it not?' That's actually a Brit saying, but I love it as it's "dead useful."
 
2014-04-06 07:33:51 PM  
I had no idear.
 
2014-04-06 07:35:37 PM  

FizixJunkee: fusillade762: Do You Ever Say Probly Instead of Probably? Here's Why.

Probly because I was drunk.

I'm absolutely certain I've never said "probly" ever in my life. "Probly" just makes you sound lazy and/or uneducated.  Sort of like the people who pronounce "picture" the same way as "pitcher."


The one that gets me like fingernails on a blackboard is "I seen".
 
2014-04-06 07:38:50 PM  

divgradcurl: the silent k helps distinguish those words from synonyms. what is your problem with 'thought'?


The "k" was not always silent in those words.   For example, "knife" is related to the Danish word "kniv" which, no surprise, means "knife",  except the Danes retained the pronunciation of the "k" and English eventually gave up on it.
 
2014-04-06 07:39:38 PM  
Article writer is retarded.

The further away you get from the language's source physically, the more dialects evolve.

A la Archer:

"JESUS CHRIST SLATE, READ A BOOK!"
 
2014-04-06 07:40:19 PM  
Used to know a radio announcer who always said Wed-nes-day. Lucky for us he died. No one since
has done it.
 
2014-04-06 07:43:52 PM  

DreamyAltarBoy: cyberspacedout: Does this linguistic phenomenon phenomenum make you all uncomfterble?

FarkedTFY


Do do dodododo.
 
2014-04-06 07:45:28 PM  

divgradcurl: what is your problem with 'thought'?


If I recall* correctly, "thought" was one of those words whose orthography in the Latin alphabet just couldn't be made to resemble its pronunciation, though runes---the original alphabet for English**---did a great job of representing English sounds.

*can't look it up right now; got to head home for dinner.  Brantgoose or someone will come along and correct me if I'm wrong, I'm sure...

**Old English
 
2014-04-06 07:46:57 PM  
Lame.  Only uptight ass-douches and English majors care about this.  English is a mutable language. Feckin' deal with it.

/English majors are useful if they bring me my Starbucks.
 
2014-04-06 07:50:48 PM  
I've heard "prolly" and "probly" every day but you will here "probably" when someone is trying to sound deliberate or professional.
The one that's interesting to me is "fave-rit".  I have never heard a single person say "fav-or-it".
 
2014-04-06 07:55:15 PM  
People trying to be all cute saying words like "presh" and "delish" make me want to stab myself in the ears.
 
2014-04-06 07:55:31 PM  

hubiestubert: What's fun, is that in the future, folks will look at these words and wonder, "Why in chocolate covered f*ck is it spelled like that when it's pronounced like this?"

Yes, I'm looking at you "knight" and "thought" and "knead" and let us not speak of what the French and the folks who lurve to Latinate the language have done to our spelling habits...


Oooh! I would lurve to latinate and knead with a thoughtful fun knight in a future chocolate covered f*ck!!!

*faints*
 
2014-04-06 07:56:12 PM  
I have trouble with "pacificist".  No wonder it got shortened.
 
2014-04-06 07:56:38 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: FizixJunkee: fusillade762: Do You Ever Say Probly Instead of Probably? Here's Why.

Probly because I was drunk.

I'm absolutely certain I've never said "probly" ever in my life. "Probly" just makes you sound lazy and/or uneducated.  Sort of like the people who pronounce "picture" the same way as "pitcher."

The one that gets me like fingernails on a blackboard is "I seen".


Real Craigslist ad -
Tell them you seen it on craigslist.
Another was advertising  "Mercedes Bends"
WTF people?
 
2014-04-06 07:56:50 PM  

Bondith: ko_kyi: It is mostly hubris to think that there are "incorrect" dialects.  Whatever gets your meaning across most effectively is correct.

Language has always been used to define social class, but whatever language and dialect anyone speaks, there is someone somewhere who looks down on you for it.

And if I can't understand someone's slab-tongued backwoods gabbling, they're not getting their meaning across effectively.


If you can't understand that "probly" and "prolly" are intended to convey "probably", it's not the speakers who are the less intelligent in this transaction. Or maybe you're just hearing impaired.
 
2014-04-06 07:57:04 PM  

Walt_Jizzney: What about loging the infinitive?

"The car needs washed."

instead of:

"The car needs to be washed

warshed"

Fixt.
 
2014-04-06 08:00:12 PM  

Zeeba Neighba: People trying to be all cute saying words like "presh" and "delish" make me want to stab myself in the ears.


Preach, sister. Or brother.

And in my daily wanderings this isn't done because of rapid speech, if anything I hear it done intentionally slower.

Ain't sayin nuthin critical. Used to say groovy and far out lol
 
2014-04-06 08:04:33 PM  

JoieD'Zen: Marcus Aurelius: FizixJunkee: fusillade762: Do You Ever Say Probly Instead of Probably? Here's Why.

Probly because I was drunk.

I'm absolutely certain I've never said "probly" ever in my life. "Probly" just makes you sound lazy and/or uneducated.  Sort of like the people who pronounce "picture" the same way as "pitcher."

The one that gets me like fingernails on a blackboard is "I seen".

Real Craigslist ad -
Tell them you seen it on craigslist.
Another was advertising  "Mercedes Bends"
WTF people?


Her man is Tiffany twisted.
 
2014-04-06 08:06:26 PM  

FizixJunkee: If I recall* correctly, "thought" was one of those words whose orthography in the Latin alphabet just couldn't be made to resemble its pronunciation, though runes---the original alphabet for English**---did a great job of representing English sounds.


Partly true.  English did lose the Middle English letter yogh - ȝ .  However, we *also* lost the sound that yogh used to make, in addition to the letter.  It used to be used to represent the sound of the "och" of the Scottish "loch", which has almost entirely vanished from English (though you'll still hear people sometimes use it in interjections like 'ugh' or 'yech'.)

And when the sound disappeared from our language, we replaced it with a wide variety of other sounds in different words - hence "enough" and "dough" don't even come close to rhyming, though enoȝ and doȝ did rhyme in Middle English.
 
2014-04-06 08:08:41 PM  
Because brain can only handle so many syllables while pondering if cat can actually has cheezburger.
 
2014-04-06 08:09:47 PM  

lindalouwho: Zeeba Neighba: People trying to be all cute saying words like "presh" and "delish" make me want to stab myself in the ears.

Preach, sister. Or brother.

And in my daily wanderings this isn't done because of rapid speech, if anything I hear it done intentionally slower.

Ain't sayin nuthin critical. Used to say groovy and far out lol


I really hate it when it is a grown woman trying to be just SO FUNNY and CUTE and HIP, like all the young chicks! (insert a ridiculous giggle here)

I despise "cray-cray" and all forms such as that too.

AH!!! Now where is that ear knife?
 
2014-04-06 08:13:43 PM  

divgradcurl: hubiestubert: What's fun, is that in the future, folks will look at these words and wonder, "Why in chocolate covered f*ck is it spelled like that when it's pronounced like this?"

Yes, I'm looking at you "knight" and "thought" and "knead" and let us not speak of what the French and the folks who lurve to Latinate the language have done to our spelling habits...

the silent k helps distinguish those words from synonyms. what is your problem with 'thought'?

if you want it to be spelled 'thawt', i must insist upon calling you a 13 year old girl (which should be belittling to a man of your age and intelligence)


I've never been bothered by thought.
Yet I despise though. I was a secret anal grammar, puctuation nazi most of my life, but mostly only beat myself for being wrong. I was tramatized daily for a few yrs with texting. Could not abbreviate. It was wrong, and I know how to spell (usually). Some how I mellowed...year ago let a transposed set of letters be free, knowngly. It wasn't til commenting on fark that I went wild and deposed of though forever. First few times I did it from a foxhole, waiting for the attack. Fark em now THO ;-)
 
2014-04-06 08:23:31 PM  

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: I still believe that the English language needs a passive-form informal collective pronoun. I nominate "y'all" because I use it.

You for the singular. Y'all for the collective.


I thought "y'all" was singular and "all y'alls" was the plural.
 
2014-04-06 08:25:10 PM  

KidKorporate: JoieD'Zen: Marcus Aurelius: FizixJunkee: fusillade762: Do You Ever Say Probly Instead of Probably? Here's Why.

Probly because I was drunk.

I'm absolutely certain I've never said "probly" ever in my life. "Probly" just makes you sound lazy and/or uneducated.  Sort of like the people who pronounce "picture" the same way as "pitcher."

The one that gets me like fingernails on a blackboard is "I seen".

Real Craigslist ad -
Tell them you seen it on craigslist.
Another was advertising  "Mercedes Bends"
WTF people?

Her man is Tiffany twisted.


Just can't kill the beast.
 
2014-04-06 08:29:26 PM  
And another thing:  "Anyways" It's not a fricken word, dang nab it; stop pretending it's proper English.
 
2014-04-06 08:32:08 PM  

Peter von Nostrand: Ya'll figure this out, am fix'n to git sumthin to eat


Djeet yet?
 
2014-04-06 08:35:12 PM  
Guilty. I live south of Mwakee and a bit east of Bloit.
 
2014-04-06 08:37:25 PM  
 
2014-04-06 08:49:57 PM  
+1 for the Sick tag. I snorted out loud.
 
2014-04-06 08:52:33 PM  

FizixJunkee: JoieD'Zen: Another was advertising  "Mercedes Bends"

I saw an eBay listing for a blouse with "sequence".

I assume she meant "sequins".

Sad, ain't it?

And:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/INC-TOP-SIZE-MEDIUM-SEQUENCE-TOP-NEW-WHITE-T OP -/151267272034?pt=US_CSA_WC_Shirts_Tops&hash=item23383b6562

and

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Sheer-Sequence-black-top-/181370885760?pt=US _C SA_WC_Shirts_Tops&hash=item2a3a8c1680

And so many more!


It was a classic Bends so I imagined a 70's mexican soft core film with a contortionist, but maybe that's just me.
 
2014-04-06 08:55:26 PM  

nullptr: I hear the even shorter 'pry' when around my family. Perhaps it is the Pennsylvania Dutch?


Pry gets used often up in my area as well
 
2014-04-06 08:58:15 PM  

Flab: I thought "y'all" was singular and "all y'alls" was the plural.


I think you mean "you" and "you'en"
 
2014-04-06 09:00:24 PM  
I saw a craigslist ad for an "oxygen settling kit".

And wondered if playing IQ possum actually pulled anyone in.
 
2014-04-06 09:06:34 PM  

divgradcurl: hubiestubert: What's fun, is that in the future, folks will look at these words and wonder, "Why in chocolate covered f*ck is it spelled like that when it's pronounced like this?"

Yes, I'm looking at you "knight" and "thought" and "knead" and let us not speak of what the French and the folks who lurve to Latinate the language have done to our spelling habits...

the silent k helps distinguish those words from synonyms. what is your problem with 'thought'?

if you want it to be spelled 'thawt', i must insist upon calling you a 13 year old girl (which should be belittling to a man of your age and intelligence)


Actually, I was pointing out that the language has changed a fair amount over the years--absorption of the Anglo-Saxons and a attempt to represent the native pronunciations with a Romanticized alphabet, despite its Germanic origins--not to mention the Great Vowel Shift, and couple that with mass printing which meant that publishers were documenting their own dialects and spellings--as opposed to individual scribes which was far more the case, where spelling was concerned--began to lock down what was "proper" English.

The /k/ in /kn/ words WAS pronounced at one point. Was was /w/ in /wr/ words, and even the /g/ in "gnaw" and "gnat." Middle English was much closer to those Germanic roots, as The Canterbury Tales illustrates, and Chaucer's work was one of the major pieces of English literature, in that it embraced English with such verve and vigor, as well as embrasure of vernacular. As printing began to replace scribes, there was more emphasis on "proper" spelling, and that was a tool for promoting dialects of English as opposed to the local. Spelling in English was far more free form in the days of Middle English, and with the arrival of the printing press, we not only saw information disseminated to the masses, but likewise a promotion of dialects as a means of power projection. In many ways, the printing press helped promote not just a slowing of the evolution of the tongue--English as a trade tongue is remarkably versatile in its absorption of loan words from a variety of sources--it likewise promoted the use of particular dialects to entrench power structures. This evolution is further slowing, now that we have the technology to record the language not just in print, but with sound. What is "proper" English is not just a matter of local dialect promotion, but now we can seal the deal with recording. American English departed from British by the promotion of American dictionaries and grammars, as a means of power projection, and now we have very much a further entrenchment of class structures by recording what is "proper" English in popular entertainment. This doesn't stop local dialects' use by any means--as anyone in the South, South West, or even here deep in Yankeeland can attest to, even in just the differences in Boston alone, let alone what happens Down East in Maine to the tongue--but it does slow the  diffusion of these changes to the language as a whole.

English is an amazingly dynamic language--owing to its roots as a trade language. It continues to absorb words at an amazing rate, and even those loan words are twisted up by the internal logic of pronunciation and spelling. Its often confusing set of internal rules are dictated by this bastard fusion of a Germanic tongue, with Latinates like French--and yes the original Latin thanks to the influence of those pesky Romans and the Mother Church--and the deep roots of the languages that the Germanic foundation encountered upon the British Isles as raiders settled upon its green and pleasant shores.

I think that you misapprehend my comment, as I do have that pesky Language Arts degree, and an appreciation for the language as a wild and wooly sort of barreling, rollicking monster of a tongue. It has changed over the long years, and those changes have resulted from the infusion of peoples into the Isles, rubbing up against one another, and diffusing those changes as populations mixed and influenced one another. As a tongue, it is a brilliant mix of influences, both low and high, and dynamic in its ability to retain essential structures, while integrating those influences at a very basic level. It's still a difficult language to master, because the internal rules are NOT just of a Germanic language, but a fusion of several language families, and it is voracious in its ability to incorporate new words at a ferocious rate.
 
2014-04-06 09:15:03 PM  

JoieD'Zen: FizixJunkee: JoieD'Zen: Another was advertising  "Mercedes Bends"

I saw an eBay listing for a blouse with "sequence".

I assume she meant "sequins".

Sad, ain't it?

And:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/INC-TOP-SIZE-MEDIUM-SEQUENCE-TOP-NEW-WHITE-T OP -/151267272034?pt=US_CSA_WC_Shirts_Tops&hash=item23383b6562

and

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Sheer-Sequence-black-top-/181370885760?pt=US _C SA_WC_Shirts_Tops&hash=item2a3a8c1680

And so many more!

It was a classic Bends so I imagined a 70's mexican soft core film with a contortionist, but maybe that's just me.


Nope, my mind went to porn with that one, too.
 
2014-04-06 09:16:01 PM  

hubiestubert: divgradcurl: hubiestubert: What's fun, is that in the future, folks will look at these words and wonder, "Why in chocolate covered f*ck is it spelled like that when it's pronounced like this?"

Yes, I'm looking at you "knight" and "thought" and "knead" and let us not speak of what the French and the folks who lurve to Latinate the language have done to our spelling habits...

the silent k helps distinguish those words from synonyms. what is your problem with 'thought'?

if you want it to be spelled 'thawt', i must insist upon calling you a 13 year old girl (which should be belittling to a man of your age and intelligence)

Actually, I was pointing out that the language has changed a fair amount over the years--absorption of the Anglo-Saxons and a attempt to represent the native pronunciations with a Romanticized alphabet, despite its Germanic origins--not to mention the Great Vowel Shift, and couple that with mass printing which meant that publishers were documenting their own dialects and spellings--as opposed to individual scribes which was far more the case, where spelling was concerned--began to lock down what was "proper" English.

The /k/ in /kn/ words WAS pronounced at one point. Was was /w/ in /wr/ words, and even the /g/ in "gnaw" and "gnat." Middle English was much closer to those Germanic roots, as The Canterbury Tales illustrates, and Chaucer's work was one of the major pieces of English literature, in that it embraced English with such verve and vigor, as well as embrasure of vernacular. As printing began to replace scribes, there was more emphasis on "proper" spelling, and that was a tool for promoting dialects of English as opposed to the local. Spelling in English was far more free form in the days of Middle English, and with the arrival of the printing press, we not only saw information disseminated to the masses, but likewise a promotion of dialects as a means of power projection. In many ways, the printing press helped promote not just a slowing of the evolution of the tongue--English as a trade tongue is remarkably versatile in its absorption of loan words from a variety of sources--it likewise promoted the use of particular dialects to entrench power structures. This evolution is further slowing, now that we have the technology to record the language not just in print, but with sound. What is "proper" English is not just a matter of local dialect promotion, but now we can seal the deal with recording. American English departed from British by the promotion of American dictionaries and grammars, as a means of power projection, and now we have very much a further entrenchment of class structures by recording what is "proper" English in popular entertainment. This doesn't stop local dialects' use by any means--as anyone in the South, South West, or even here deep in Yankeeland can attest to, even in just the differences in Boston alone, let alone what happens Down East in Maine to the tongue--but it does slow the  diffusion of these changes to the language as a whole.

English is an amazingly dynamic language--owing to its roots as a trade language. It continues to absorb words at an amazing rate, and even those loan words are twisted up by the internal logic of pronunciation and spelling. Its often confusing set of internal rules are dictated by this bastard fusion of a Germanic tongue, with Latinates like French--and yes the original Latin thanks to the influence of those pesky Romans and the Mother Church--and the deep roots of the languages that the Germanic foundation encountered upon the British Isles as raiders settled upon its green and pleasant shores.

I think that you misapprehend my comment, as I do have that pesky Language Arts degree, and an appreciation for the language as a wild and wooly sort of barreling, rollicking monster of a tongue. It has changed over the long years, and those changes have resulted from the infusion of peoples into the Isles, rubbing up against one another, and diffusing those changes as populations mixed and influenced one another. As a tongue, it is a brilliant mix of influences, both low and high, and dynamic in its ability to retain essential structures, while integrating those influences at a very basic level. It's still a difficult language to master, because the internal rules are NOT just of a Germanic language, but a fusion of several language families, and it is voracious in its ability to incorporate new words at a ferocious rate.


tl;dr
 
2014-04-06 09:16:32 PM  

hubiestubert: As a tongue, it is a brilliant mix of influences, both low and high, and dynamic in its ability to retain essential structures, while integrating those influences at a very basic level. It's still a difficult language to master, because the internal rules are NOT just of a Germanic language, but a fusion of several language families, and it is voracious in its ability to incorporate new words at a ferocious rate.


Your post is nicely put.  English is a meat grinder of a language partly due to the utility of it as a trade language, whether we are talking about wheat, brandy, tobacco, jazz, or an internet product.   US english is the language of the port city whorehouse, and that is what gives it power.
 
2014-04-06 09:16:36 PM  

SpeelChuck: Peter von Nostrand: Ya'll figure this out, am fix'n to git sumthin to eat

Djeet yet?


Yeah. Jew?
 
2014-04-06 09:17:18 PM  

fappomatic: You mean it isn't caused by hoodies and saggy pants?


"Aks you a question" and "Go to the liberry" are the two notable corruptions I can think of.
 
2014-04-06 09:17:33 PM  

slotz: Yeah. Jew?


'Sgo.
 
2014-04-06 09:19:13 PM  

mrmopar5287: "Aks you a question" and "Go to the liberry" are the two notable corruptions I can think of.


And yet no one misunderstands it.  Dialect is a tool to define social status.
 
2014-04-06 09:33:57 PM  

Flab: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: I still believe that the English language needs a passive-form informal collective pronoun. I nominate "y'all" because I use it.

You for the singular. Y'all for the collective.

I thought "y'all" was singular and "all y'alls" was the plural.


No. It is very much like the German "Sie." It is collective plural or the second person formal.
 
2014-04-06 09:49:04 PM  
This is an intristing thread.
 
2014-04-06 09:49:19 PM  

lindalouwho: divgradcurl: hubiestubert: What's fun, is that in the future, folks will look at these words and wonder, "Why in chocolate covered f*ck is it spelled like that when it's pronounced like this?"

Yes, I'm looking at you "knight" and "thought" and "knead" and let us not speak of what the French and the folks who lurve to Latinate the language have done to our spelling habits...

the silent k helps distinguish those words from synonyms. what is your problem with 'thought'?

if you want it to be spelled 'thawt', i must insist upon calling you a 13 year old girl (which should be belittling to a man of your age and intelligence)

I've never been bothered by thought.
Yet I despise though. I was a secret anal grammar, puctuation nazi most of my life, but mostly only beat myself for being wrong. I was tramatized daily for a few yrs with texting. Could not abbreviate. It was wrong, and I know how to spell (usually). Some how I mellowed...year ago let a transposed set of letters be free, knowngly. It wasn't til commenting on fark that I went wild and deposed of though forever. First few times I did it from a foxhole, waiting for the attack. Fark em now THO ;-)


When I was in school I had a professor who very much changed my view of the language. Jay Hoar was the first living professor to have a building named after him at the University of Maine at Farmington. He attended the school as an undergrad for teaching, and returned to teach English education, and had been there about fifty years by the time I rolled in. Each year for Linguistics, he gave one lecture that summed up the power of the language. "Ain't is a Beautiful Word."

The ability of the language to preserve the poetry of Chaucer and Shakespeare and Donne, as well as the travelogues of Melville and the adventure tales of Burroughs and the Beat Poets as well as The Sugarhill Gang, that is the power of English. It's not just for high tone literature, it's a language that sees firm use. It has dialects that are sturdy structures, that are burly and useful, and what is amazing about the language, is that folks can internally switch from Maine Skiddah Tahk, to commenting on UMaine Black Bears, or giving tourists intelligible directions, and each iteration sees a slightly differing use of vernacular and dialect. Sometimes that can be used to freeze folks from "Away" out entirely, or it can be a warm embrasure of the comforts of home and hearth, and then switch again to an entirely professional conversation that tones down the dialect for clearness and mutual intelligibility. Jay loved the language, in all its iterations, and its robustness as a tongue, not just for art, for technical use, but for use all around. That lecture he gave every year changed how I viewed the language as a whole. What is "proper English" changes. All the time. "Proper" depends on the audience. Depends on the context. It is an amazingly robust language in that its dialects and forms fit their use. As much as I love my mother's Nihongo, it isn't as versatile a language as English. Structurally, Nihongo is far more elegant, and its internal logic is sound, and beautiful, but it is often clumsy at integrating new words and structures. Wonderful for social contexts, with gradations of forms for a multitude of interactions, and yet English is a far better language for business. English is at home both in a bar and a salon, in a teahouse, at a wharf, a hospital, a gas station, at a symphony, at a game, and yes, it's all cockamamie with languages its absorbed bits from, but still, in maintains an internal logic, from Kingston to Bangor to London to Kuala Lumpur.

English can stand a lot of use. Texting is use. Rap is use. Dialects are all about use. English is a language that works damn hard, because it's not just about high art and law and philosophy, it's a language for fishermen, for ranchers, for science, for cooks, for doctors, for clerks, and that we can switch up and see the beauty in the tongue in all these varied dialects and usages, that's a real gift.
 
2014-04-06 10:02:51 PM  

hubiestubert: lindalouwho: divgradcurl: hubiestubert: What's fun, is that in the future, folks will look at these words and wonder, "Why in chocolate covered f*ck is it spelled like that when it's pronounced like this?"

Yes, I'm looking at you "knight" and "thought" and "knead" and let us not speak of what the French and the folks who lurve to Latinate the language have done to our spelling habits...

the silent k helps distinguish those words from synonyms. what is your problem with 'thought'?

if you want it to be spelled 'thawt', i must insist upon calling you a 13 year old girl (which should be belittling to a man of your age and intelligence)

I've never been bothered by thought.
Yet I despise though. I was a secret anal grammar, puctuation nazi most of my life, but mostly only beat myself for being wrong. I was tramatized daily for a few yrs with texting. Could not abbreviate. It was wrong, and I know how to spell (usually). Some how I mellowed...year ago let a transposed set of letters be free, knowngly. It wasn't til commenting on fark that I went wild and deposed of though forever. First few times I did it from a foxhole, waiting for the attack. Fark em now THO ;-)

When I was in school I had a professor who very much changed my view of the language. Jay Hoar was the first living professor to have a building named after him at the University of Maine at Farmington. He attended the school as an undergrad for teaching, and returned to teach English education, and had been there about fifty years by the time I rolled in. Each year for Linguistics, he gave one lecture that summed up the power of the language. "Ain't is a Beautiful Word."

The ability of the language to preserve the poetry of Chaucer and Shakespeare and Donne, as well as the travelogues of Melville and the adventure tales of Burroughs and the Beat Poets as well as The Sugarhill Gang, that is the power of English. It's not just for high tone literature, it's a language that sees firm use. It has dialects that are sturdy structures, that are burly and useful, and what is amazing about the language, is that folks can internally switch from Maine Skiddah Tahk, to commenting on UMaine Black Bears, or giving tourists intelligible directions, and each iteration sees a slightly differing use of vernacular and dialect. Sometimes that can be used to freeze folks from "Away" out entirely, or it can be a warm embrasure of the comforts of home and hearth, and then switch again to an entirely professional conversation that tones down the dialect for clearness and mutual intelligibility. Jay loved the language, in all its iterations, and its robustness as a tongue, not just for art, for technical use, but for use all around. That lecture he gave every year changed how I viewed the language as a whole. What is "proper English" changes. All the time. "Proper" depends on the audience. Depends on the context. It is an amazingly robust language in that its dialects and forms fit their use. As much as I love my mother's Nihongo, it isn't as versatile a language as English. Structurally, Nihongo is far more elegant, and its internal logic is sound, and beautiful, but it is often clumsy at integrating new words and structures. Wonderful for social contexts, with gradations of forms for a multitude of interactions, and yet English is a far better language for business. English is at home both in a bar and a salon, in a teahouse, at a wharf, a hospital, a gas station, at a symphony, at a game, and yes, it's all cockamamie with languages its absorbed bits from, but still, in maintains an internal logic, from Kingston to Bangor to London to Kuala Lumpur.

English can stand a lot of use. Texting is use. Rap is use. Dialects are all about use. English is a language that works damn hard, because it's not just about high art and law and philosophy, it's a language for fishermen, for ranchers, for science, for cooks, for doctors, for clerks, and that we can switch up and see the beauty in the tongue in all these varied dialects and usages, that's a real gift.


That was beautiful.
 
2014-04-06 10:04:34 PM  
Has anyone mentioned "exackly"?
 
2014-04-06 10:11:00 PM  
Ya'll just don't get me started on the proper spelling of 'Whupass'. If so, then I will jam a whooping crane with whooping cough up your whooping ass.
 
2014-04-06 10:13:29 PM  

Kamekoozie: Ya'll just don't get me started on the proper spelling of 'Whupass'. If so, then I will jam a whooping crane with whooping cough up your whooping ass.


I dunno, buddy.

Think the cheese stands alone.
 
2014-04-06 10:17:13 PM  
"That's one small step f'ra man, one giant leap for mankind."
 
2014-04-06 10:32:00 PM  

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: I still believe that the English language needs a passive-form informal collective pronoun. I nominate "y'all" because I use it.

You for the singular. Y'all for the collective.


All all y'all need are all the varient's of  "y'all" all y'all've been using. Some of y'all use forms of "y'all" not all y'all use, though I think all y'all'd've used them if all y'all grew up hearing the "y'all"s some of y'all use.
 
2014-04-06 10:39:28 PM  

hubiestubert: and it is voracious in its ability to incorporate new words at a ferocious rate.


well said. mmm, voracious

www.absurdintellectual.com
 
2014-04-06 10:49:47 PM  
also i meant the whole thing was well said, not just the bit i included at the end.
 
2014-04-06 10:55:28 PM  
Whatever, to me the worst offenders will always be "business professionals" trying to sound smart with their misuse of technical terms and the much loathed "proactive."
 
2014-04-06 10:57:19 PM  

GentDirkly: I've heard "prolly" and "probly" every day but you will here "probably" when someone is trying to sound deliberate or professional.
The one that's interesting to me is "fave-rit".  I have never heard a single person say "fav-or-it".


I say "fav-or-it" and "choc-uh-lit". I am also, however, guilty of "comfterble".
 
2014-04-06 11:09:14 PM  

hubiestubert: What's fun, is that in the future, folks will look at these words and wonder, "Why in chocolate covered f*ck is it spelled like that when it's pronounced like this?"

Yes, I'm looking at you "knight" and "thought" and "knead" and let us not speak of what the French and the folks who lurve to Latinate the language have done to our spelling habits...


As someone who had learned English as a foreign language, let me assure you, that billions of people of our generation around the world have looked at English words and asked the same question already at least a hundred times each. In the contest of what level of suckery the spelling of a language achieves, English wins without contest.
 
2014-04-06 11:15:27 PM  
Yes I know I still have much to learn.
 
2014-04-06 11:25:17 PM  
Go read up your room.

I grew up being told it. Yes, I am PA Dutch.
 
2014-04-06 11:26:10 PM  

traylor: hubiestubert: What's fun, is that in the future, folks will look at these words and wonder, "Why in chocolate covered f*ck is it spelled like that when it's pronounced like this?"

Yes, I'm looking at you "knight" and "thought" and "knead" and let us not speak of what the French and the folks who lurve to Latinate the language have done to our spelling habits...

As someone who had learned English as a foreign language, let me assure you, that billions of people of our generation around the world have looked at English words and asked the same question already at least a hundred times each. In the contest of what level of suckery the spelling of a language achieves, English wins without contest.


pretend it's a mix of a representation of sound and ideograms, like modern Japanese.  The spelling is just a set of suggestions with the history of the word layered into it.
 
2014-04-06 11:32:35 PM  
My wife and I grew up in northern California and share the same regional dialect, for the most part, but she was raised by her midwestern grandparents, so I still can't tell if she's saying 'pen' or 'pin'. Her brother does it too, drives my inner grammar-nazi f*cking nuts.

Also, for the thread:www.veryicon.comwww.veryicon.comwww.veryicon.com
                                               'Dah-lek'                                                       'Dar-lek'                                                      'Day-lick'


/discus
 
2014-04-06 11:35:05 PM  

ko_kyi: It is mostly hubris to think that there are "incorrect" dialects.  Whatever gets your meaning across most effectively is correct.

Language has always been used to define social class, but whatever language and dialect anyone speaks, there is someone somewhere who looks down on you for it.


You sound dumb.
 
2014-04-06 11:35:27 PM  
Because they're stupid, that's why.  That's why everybody does everything.
 
2014-04-06 11:35:33 PM  

Brainsick: My wife and I grew up in northern California and share the same regional dialect, for the most part, but she was raised by her midwestern grandparents, so I still can't tell if she's saying 'pen' or 'pin'. Her brother does it too, drives my inner grammar-nazi f*cking nuts.

Also, for the thread:[www.veryicon.com image 256x256][www.veryicon.com image 256x256][www.veryicon.com image 256x256]
                                               'Dah-lek'                                                       'Dar-lek'                                                      'Day-lick'


/discus


DAY-lek

/but I don't watch dr. who and never have.
 
2014-04-06 11:38:03 PM  

Walt_Jizzney: Walt_Jizzney: What about loging the infinitive?

"The car needs washed."

instead of:

"The car needs to be washed."

I find this annoying. :|

Damnit, I mean 'losing" the infinitive!

Preview, self!!!!


I've always thought of it as people using the wrong verb conjugation to create a gerund, since they haven't been properly taught the grammatical device in question. "The car needs washing" would be grammatically correct here. I'll accept that some people aren't taught enough grammar in schools, or that more of it isn't taught early enough, but kids should at least be able to figure it out intuitively by learning from what they hear. I'll accept that people learning English could make this mistake at first, but I've only heard it from native speakers.
 
2014-04-06 11:50:19 PM  
"cah-mah-rah"
img.fark.net
 
2014-04-06 11:50:59 PM  
Anyone ever read or watch The adventure of English by Melvyn Bragg?
 
2014-04-06 11:55:29 PM  

MoonPirate: Anyone ever read or watch The adventure of English by Melvyn Bragg?


No. Pleez enlyten uss
 
2014-04-07 12:00:19 AM  
That's libary, not libry.
 
2014-04-07 12:04:06 AM  
Yinz
 
2014-04-07 12:25:48 AM  
traylor:

As someone who had learned English as a foreign language, let me assure you, that billions of people of our generation around the world have looked at English words and asked the same question already at least a hundred times each. In the contest of what level of suckery the spelling of a language achieves, English wins without contest.


Have you taken a peak at Danish?
 
2014-04-07 12:26:25 AM  

nullptr: I hear the even shorter 'pry' when around my family. Perhaps it is the Pennsylvania Dutch?


EvilEeyore: Go read up your room.

I grew up being told it. Yes, I am PA Dutch.


PA Dutch has some strange things going on.

"Outen the lights".
"Throw Papa down the stairs his hat".
"It wonders me..."
And my favorite:  Dropping "to be" completely from a sentence, as in "the dishes need washed".
 
2014-04-07 12:32:38 AM  

Barfmaker: hubiestubert: What's fun, is that in the future, folks will look at these words and wonder, "Why in chocolate covered f*ck is it spelled like that when it's pronounced like this?"

Yes, I'm looking at you "knight" and "thought" and "knead" and let us not speak of what the French and the folks who lurve to Latinate the language have done to our spelling habits...

Chihuahua.

I rest my case.


That's a pretty shiat case, considering chihuahua is pronounced properly for a Spanish word, which it is. "Chihuahua" is not only a Mexican breed of dog, it's also a Mexican state. It's a loanword, not a fully integrated word, and thus weird spelling/pronunciation is to be expected. (And a lot of words from Mexico and South America were loanwords from Quechua or other native languages into Spanish, and then further loaned into English, resulting in extra wackiness.)

Unlike the silent initial k, and the general insanity that is English vowels. Our vowel spellings really ARE totally messed up - it's a result of the Great Vowel Shift, where all the long vowels changed sounds just as spelling was being ironed out, leaving the language an orthographic disaster.
 
2014-04-07 01:53:00 AM  

Z-clipped: nullptr: I hear the even shorter 'pry' when around my family. Perhaps it is the Pennsylvania Dutch?

EvilEeyore: Go read up your room.

I grew up being told it. Yes, I am PA Dutch.

PA Dutch has some strange things going on.

"Outen the lights".
"Throw Papa down the stairs his hat".
"It wonders me..."
And my favorite:  Dropping "to be" completely from a sentence, as in "the dishes need washed".


Ah, this may answer my question - a guy I know who frequently leaves out the "to be" is part German.
 
2014-04-07 02:08:35 AM  

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: I still believe that the English language needs a passive-form informal collective pronoun. I nominate "y'all" because I use it.

You for the singular. Y'all for the collective.


"You" is plural.

It's the singular we lost (thou).
 
2014-04-07 03:06:28 AM  

FizixJunkee: traylor:

As someone who had learned English as a foreign language, let me assure you, that billions of people of our generation around the world have looked at English words and asked the same question already at least a hundred times each. In the contest of what level of suckery the spelling of a language achieves, English wins without contest.


Have you taken a peak at Danish?


Danish is not a language. It is a series of unintelligible guttural sounds.

http://youtu.be/s-mOy8VUEBk

But seriously - my daughter is learning to read Norwegian and English at the same time, and it is hard to get her to read English, just because it is so much HARDER. The phonics approach helps, but seriously, if only there could have been a spelling reform at some point in the last few centuries, English would be a lot easier.

It is useful for learning your Germanic language cognates, though. "Durch" is the same as "through" - you can tell by the "gh" at the end! Whee!
 
2014-04-07 03:14:08 AM  

if_i_really_have_to: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: I still believe that the English language needs a passive-form informal collective pronoun. I nominate "y'all" because I use it.

You for the singular. Y'all for the collective.

"You" is plural.

It's the singular we lost (thou).


Or more precisely, it's the singular informal we lost. Thou was the equivalent of "du" in German.

You, or ye, was the plural familiar and was used as the singular formal. Eventually "thou-thee-thine" was lost and we ended up using the plural you/ye for both.
 
2014-04-07 04:02:58 AM  

hubiestubert: divgradcurl: hubiestubert: What's fun, is that in the future, folks will look at these words and wonder, "Why in chocolate covered f*ck is it spelled like that when it's pronounced like this?"

Yes, I'm looking at you "knight" and "thought" and "knead" and let us not speak of what the French and the folks who lurve to Latinate the language have done to our spelling habits...

the silent k helps distinguish those words from synonyms. what is your problem with 'thought'?

if you want it to be spelled 'thawt', i must insist upon calling you a 13 year old girl (which should be belittling to a man of your age and intelligence)

Actually, I was pointing out that the language has changed a fair amount over the years--absorption of the Anglo-Saxons and a attempt to represent the native pronunciations with a Romanticized alphabet, despite its Germanic origins--not to mention the Great Vowel Shift, and couple that with mass printing which meant that publishers were documenting their own dialects and spellings--as opposed to individual scribes which was far more the case, where spelling was concerned--began to lock down what was "proper" English.

The /k/ in /kn/ words WAS pronounced at one point. Was was /w/ in /wr/ words, and even the /g/ in "gnaw" and "gnat." Middle English was much closer to those Germanic roots, as The Canterbury Tales illustrates, and Chaucer's work was one of the major pieces of English literature, in that it embraced English with such verve and vigor, as well as embrasure of vernacular. As printing began to replace scribes, there was more emphasis on "proper" spelling, and that was a tool for promoting dialects of English as opposed to the local. Spelling in English was far more free form in the days of Middle English, and with the arrival of the printing press, we not only saw information disseminated to the masses, but likewise a promotion of dialects as a means of power projection. In many ways, the printing press helped promote not just a slowing o ...


There is something so shockingly beautiful about the way you use words. It's like seeing a miner emerge covered in dust and darkness into sunlight holding up one gorgeous piece of a deep vein. I admit to having whatever the equivalent is to a girl boner for a long list of farkers but when I see your name above a post, my heart dances a little. It's as involuntary as breathing.

I know this "prolly" make you somewhat discomfited--you are always a little shy about your writing, but I don't care. As the daughter of an editor and as someone who cares tremendously about language, I am come to seize on your posts as precious things and am more grateful than I can express here for their craft and content.

What a lovely thing to wake up to at 4 which should be 5 and is still the strangest time to be awake and reading things. Would that I always had such fine things to read at any hour.

Bless you.
 
2014-04-07 06:55:37 AM  

ginandbacon: *snip*


Aw shucks. I'm just a poor Southern boy caught up in Yankeeland, by way of Mizzoura and Texas. Blame Heinlein, Clemens, Conroy and John D. MacDonald for my wordiness.
 
2014-04-07 08:55:58 AM  

hubiestubert: ginandbacon: *snip*

Aw shucks. I'm just a poor Southern boy caught up in Yankeeland, by way of Mizzoura and Texas. Blame Heinlein, Clemens, Conroy and John D. MacDonald for my wordiness.


Good Lord, I give you a compliment and you give me a reading assignment? Fair enough. I'll trust you that far.
 
2014-04-07 09:40:47 AM  

SpeelChuck: Peter von Nostrand: Ya'll figure this out, am fix'n to git sumthin to eat

Djeet yet?


skweet
 
2014-04-07 10:15:46 AM  

Barfmaker: Chihuahua.


Spanish is an almost-perfect sound-out language. But it has some different rules than English. English often borrows foreign words and doesn't change the spelling. That's how things go.
 
2014-04-07 10:55:08 AM  

ginandbacon: hubiestubert: ginandbacon: *snip*

Aw shucks. I'm just a poor Southern boy caught up in Yankeeland, by way of Mizzoura and Texas. Blame Heinlein, Clemens, Conroy and John D. MacDonald for my wordiness.

Good Lord, I give you a compliment and you give me a reading assignment? Fair enough. I'll trust you that far.


Just put blame where it's due. Like most menfolk I take compliments poorly unless there's a "good game" and some back slapping involved. It's our cue that there's hugging involved, but there'shiatting too, so it's OK. Again, blame the Southern upbringing. ;)
 
2014-04-07 11:00:34 AM  

Breech Birth: Used to know a radio announcer who always said Wed-nes-day. Lucky for us he died. No one since
has done it.


I do it.  Does that count?

I also say "towel" like "tow-well" and 'picture' like "pick-ture" - just in general say all syllables in words that tend to get amputated in casual speech.  People tend to razz me, but I'm the first one they come to when they need help with a big word.
 
2014-04-07 11:19:22 AM  
I pronounce Brittany Spears "Komodo Dragon".
 
2014-04-07 11:29:07 AM  

Cynicism101: Barfmaker: Chihuahua.

Spanish is an almost-perfect sound-out language. But it has some different rules than English. English often borrows foreign words and doesn't change the spelling. That's how things go.


Chihuahua is spelled *exactly* the way it's pronounced. English is just nuts. When I was teaching ESL in Italy, I basically told my students to just memorize everything. There is literally no rhyme nor reason unless you have a PhD in the field and even then it's still stupid.

hubiestubert: ginandbacon: hubiestubert: ginandbacon: *snip*

Aw shucks. I'm just a poor Southern boy caught up in Yankeeland, by way of Mizzoura and Texas. Blame Heinlein, Clemens, Conroy and John D. MacDonald for my wordiness.

Good Lord, I give you a compliment and you give me a reading assignment? Fair enough. I'll trust you that far.

Just put blame where it's due. Like most menfolk I take compliments poorly unless there's a "good game" and some back slapping involved. It's our cue that there's hugging involved, but there'shiatting too, so it's OK. Again, blame the Southern upbringing. ;)


Pfft, men ;)
 
2014-04-07 11:47:46 AM  

ginandbacon: Cynicism101: Barfmaker: Chihuahua.

Spanish is an almost-perfect sound-out language. But it has some different rules than English. English often borrows foreign words and doesn't change the spelling. That's how things go.

Chihuahua is spelled *exactly* the way it's pronounced. English is just nuts. When I was teaching ESL in Italy, I basically told my students to just memorize everything. There is literally no rhyme nor reason unless you have a PhD in the field and even then it's still stupid.

hubiestubert: ginandbacon: hubiestubert: ginandbacon: *snip*

Aw shucks. I'm just a poor Southern boy caught up in Yankeeland, by way of Mizzoura and Texas. Blame Heinlein, Clemens, Conroy and John D. MacDonald for my wordiness.

Good Lord, I give you a compliment and you give me a reading assignment? Fair enough. I'll trust you that far.

Just put blame where it's due. Like most menfolk I take compliments poorly unless there's a "good game" and some back slapping involved. It's our cue that there's hugging involved, but there'shiatting too, so it's OK. Again, blame the Southern upbringing. ;)

Pfft, men ;)


I was set to do ESL after UMaine Farmington--though that was teaching in Malaysia, and teaching other English teachers. In the mid 90s, the government decided to make the switch to American Standard, as opposed to British Standard. Would have been a very sweet gig, but the galIwas dating had zero interest in heading to Kuala Lumpur for four years. It is one of my largest regrets that I didn't take the job. Australia a hop, skip and a jump, the same for Thailand and Guam--my mother settled there after the divorce--and it would have been a lot of fun. Blood warm water, amazing beaches, and fishing, and room and board covered for the four year contract. "Let's go to New England" she said...

Bitter as a baking soda lollipop on that one still.
 
2014-04-07 12:16:20 PM  

hubiestubert: Bitter as a baking soda lollipop


I am so stealing this.
 
2014-04-07 02:47:19 PM  

Breech Birth: Used to know a radio announcer who always said Wed-nes-day. Lucky for us he died. No one since
has done it


I've said Wed-nes-day a few times, like when I was learning to read the days of the week.

Zeeba Neighba: People trying to be all cute saying words like "presh" and "delish" make me want to stab myself in the ears.


Ugh, I hate that so much! It makes me cringe.
 
2014-04-07 02:47:25 PM  

ginandbacon: hubiestubert: Bitter as a baking soda lollipop

I am so stealing this.


Feel free. My contributions to teh Interwebz. ;)
 
2014-04-07 04:31:07 PM  

studebaker hoch: Next up: The vanishing 'T'

Mou'ains. Ki'ens. Isaac New'on.


I didn't even realize I talk like this (it's regional) until I was trying to figure out why "Clinton" sounded so funny when my friend from Pennsylvania said it.  She says the T.   If I try to say all those vanished Ts it feels weird and sounds weirder.  Whatever you're used to, I guess.
 
2014-04-07 08:46:05 PM  

EvilEeyore: Go read up your room.

I grew up being told it. Yes, I am PA Dutch.


I don't know for sure how the word came about, but we used "redd". I was told it was short for "ready up the room", so your spelling makes more sense.

/pgh
 
2014-04-07 08:48:52 PM  

mllawso: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: I still believe that the English language needs a passive-form informal collective pronoun. I nominate "y'all" because I use it.

You for the singular. Y'all for the collective.

All all y'all need are all the varient's of  "y'all" all y'all've been using. Some of y'all use forms of "y'all" not all y'all use, though I think all y'all'd've used them if all y'all grew up hearing the "y'all"s some of y'all use.


Makes me glad I use yinz ;-)
 
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