If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Slate)   A look at why certain regions have developed incorrect dialects that allow them to say words with unstressed syllables, like "Probly"   (slate.com) divider line 130
    More: Sick, stressed syllable, English Words, forms, Ly the Fairy  
•       •       •

12330 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Apr 2014 at 6:28 PM (15 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



130 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-04-06 11:35:33 PM

Brainsick: My wife and I grew up in northern California and share the same regional dialect, for the most part, but she was raised by her midwestern grandparents, so I still can't tell if she's saying 'pen' or 'pin'. Her brother does it too, drives my inner grammar-nazi f*cking nuts.

Also, for the thread:[www.veryicon.com image 256x256][www.veryicon.com image 256x256][www.veryicon.com image 256x256]
                                               'Dah-lek'                                                       'Dar-lek'                                                      'Day-lick'


/discus


DAY-lek

/but I don't watch dr. who and never have.
 
2014-04-06 11:38:03 PM

Walt_Jizzney: Walt_Jizzney: What about loging the infinitive?

"The car needs washed."

instead of:

"The car needs to be washed."

I find this annoying. :|

Damnit, I mean 'losing" the infinitive!

Preview, self!!!!


I've always thought of it as people using the wrong verb conjugation to create a gerund, since they haven't been properly taught the grammatical device in question. "The car needs washing" would be grammatically correct here. I'll accept that some people aren't taught enough grammar in schools, or that more of it isn't taught early enough, but kids should at least be able to figure it out intuitively by learning from what they hear. I'll accept that people learning English could make this mistake at first, but I've only heard it from native speakers.
 
2014-04-06 11:50:19 PM
"cah-mah-rah"
img.fark.net
 
2014-04-06 11:50:59 PM
Anyone ever read or watch The adventure of English by Melvyn Bragg?
 
2014-04-06 11:55:29 PM

MoonPirate: Anyone ever read or watch The adventure of English by Melvyn Bragg?


No. Pleez enlyten uss
 
2014-04-07 12:00:19 AM
That's libary, not libry.
 
2014-04-07 12:04:06 AM
Yinz
 
2014-04-07 12:25:48 AM
traylor:

As someone who had learned English as a foreign language, let me assure you, that billions of people of our generation around the world have looked at English words and asked the same question already at least a hundred times each. In the contest of what level of suckery the spelling of a language achieves, English wins without contest.


Have you taken a peak at Danish?
 
2014-04-07 12:26:25 AM

nullptr: I hear the even shorter 'pry' when around my family. Perhaps it is the Pennsylvania Dutch?


EvilEeyore: Go read up your room.

I grew up being told it. Yes, I am PA Dutch.


PA Dutch has some strange things going on.

"Outen the lights".
"Throw Papa down the stairs his hat".
"It wonders me..."
And my favorite:  Dropping "to be" completely from a sentence, as in "the dishes need washed".
 
2014-04-07 12:32:38 AM

Barfmaker: hubiestubert: What's fun, is that in the future, folks will look at these words and wonder, "Why in chocolate covered f*ck is it spelled like that when it's pronounced like this?"

Yes, I'm looking at you "knight" and "thought" and "knead" and let us not speak of what the French and the folks who lurve to Latinate the language have done to our spelling habits...

Chihuahua.

I rest my case.


That's a pretty shiat case, considering chihuahua is pronounced properly for a Spanish word, which it is. "Chihuahua" is not only a Mexican breed of dog, it's also a Mexican state. It's a loanword, not a fully integrated word, and thus weird spelling/pronunciation is to be expected. (And a lot of words from Mexico and South America were loanwords from Quechua or other native languages into Spanish, and then further loaned into English, resulting in extra wackiness.)

Unlike the silent initial k, and the general insanity that is English vowels. Our vowel spellings really ARE totally messed up - it's a result of the Great Vowel Shift, where all the long vowels changed sounds just as spelling was being ironed out, leaving the language an orthographic disaster.
 
2014-04-07 01:53:00 AM

Z-clipped: nullptr: I hear the even shorter 'pry' when around my family. Perhaps it is the Pennsylvania Dutch?

EvilEeyore: Go read up your room.

I grew up being told it. Yes, I am PA Dutch.

PA Dutch has some strange things going on.

"Outen the lights".
"Throw Papa down the stairs his hat".
"It wonders me..."
And my favorite:  Dropping "to be" completely from a sentence, as in "the dishes need washed".


Ah, this may answer my question - a guy I know who frequently leaves out the "to be" is part German.
 
2014-04-07 02:08:35 AM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: I still believe that the English language needs a passive-form informal collective pronoun. I nominate "y'all" because I use it.

You for the singular. Y'all for the collective.


"You" is plural.

It's the singular we lost (thou).
 
2014-04-07 03:06:28 AM

FizixJunkee: traylor:

As someone who had learned English as a foreign language, let me assure you, that billions of people of our generation around the world have looked at English words and asked the same question already at least a hundred times each. In the contest of what level of suckery the spelling of a language achieves, English wins without contest.


Have you taken a peak at Danish?


Danish is not a language. It is a series of unintelligible guttural sounds.

http://youtu.be/s-mOy8VUEBk

But seriously - my daughter is learning to read Norwegian and English at the same time, and it is hard to get her to read English, just because it is so much HARDER. The phonics approach helps, but seriously, if only there could have been a spelling reform at some point in the last few centuries, English would be a lot easier.

It is useful for learning your Germanic language cognates, though. "Durch" is the same as "through" - you can tell by the "gh" at the end! Whee!
 
2014-04-07 03:14:08 AM

if_i_really_have_to: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: I still believe that the English language needs a passive-form informal collective pronoun. I nominate "y'all" because I use it.

You for the singular. Y'all for the collective.

"You" is plural.

It's the singular we lost (thou).


Or more precisely, it's the singular informal we lost. Thou was the equivalent of "du" in German.

You, or ye, was the plural familiar and was used as the singular formal. Eventually "thou-thee-thine" was lost and we ended up using the plural you/ye for both.
 
2014-04-07 04:02:58 AM

hubiestubert: divgradcurl: hubiestubert: What's fun, is that in the future, folks will look at these words and wonder, "Why in chocolate covered f*ck is it spelled like that when it's pronounced like this?"

Yes, I'm looking at you "knight" and "thought" and "knead" and let us not speak of what the French and the folks who lurve to Latinate the language have done to our spelling habits...

the silent k helps distinguish those words from synonyms. what is your problem with 'thought'?

if you want it to be spelled 'thawt', i must insist upon calling you a 13 year old girl (which should be belittling to a man of your age and intelligence)

Actually, I was pointing out that the language has changed a fair amount over the years--absorption of the Anglo-Saxons and a attempt to represent the native pronunciations with a Romanticized alphabet, despite its Germanic origins--not to mention the Great Vowel Shift, and couple that with mass printing which meant that publishers were documenting their own dialects and spellings--as opposed to individual scribes which was far more the case, where spelling was concerned--began to lock down what was "proper" English.

The /k/ in /kn/ words WAS pronounced at one point. Was was /w/ in /wr/ words, and even the /g/ in "gnaw" and "gnat." Middle English was much closer to those Germanic roots, as The Canterbury Tales illustrates, and Chaucer's work was one of the major pieces of English literature, in that it embraced English with such verve and vigor, as well as embrasure of vernacular. As printing began to replace scribes, there was more emphasis on "proper" spelling, and that was a tool for promoting dialects of English as opposed to the local. Spelling in English was far more free form in the days of Middle English, and with the arrival of the printing press, we not only saw information disseminated to the masses, but likewise a promotion of dialects as a means of power projection. In many ways, the printing press helped promote not just a slowing o ...


There is something so shockingly beautiful about the way you use words. It's like seeing a miner emerge covered in dust and darkness into sunlight holding up one gorgeous piece of a deep vein. I admit to having whatever the equivalent is to a girl boner for a long list of farkers but when I see your name above a post, my heart dances a little. It's as involuntary as breathing.

I know this "prolly" make you somewhat discomfited--you are always a little shy about your writing, but I don't care. As the daughter of an editor and as someone who cares tremendously about language, I am come to seize on your posts as precious things and am more grateful than I can express here for their craft and content.

What a lovely thing to wake up to at 4 which should be 5 and is still the strangest time to be awake and reading things. Would that I always had such fine things to read at any hour.

Bless you.
 
2014-04-07 06:55:37 AM

ginandbacon: *snip*


Aw shucks. I'm just a poor Southern boy caught up in Yankeeland, by way of Mizzoura and Texas. Blame Heinlein, Clemens, Conroy and John D. MacDonald for my wordiness.
 
2014-04-07 08:55:58 AM

hubiestubert: ginandbacon: *snip*

Aw shucks. I'm just a poor Southern boy caught up in Yankeeland, by way of Mizzoura and Texas. Blame Heinlein, Clemens, Conroy and John D. MacDonald for my wordiness.


Good Lord, I give you a compliment and you give me a reading assignment? Fair enough. I'll trust you that far.
 
2014-04-07 09:40:47 AM

SpeelChuck: Peter von Nostrand: Ya'll figure this out, am fix'n to git sumthin to eat

Djeet yet?


skweet
 
2014-04-07 10:15:46 AM

Barfmaker: Chihuahua.


Spanish is an almost-perfect sound-out language. But it has some different rules than English. English often borrows foreign words and doesn't change the spelling. That's how things go.
 
2014-04-07 10:55:08 AM

ginandbacon: hubiestubert: ginandbacon: *snip*

Aw shucks. I'm just a poor Southern boy caught up in Yankeeland, by way of Mizzoura and Texas. Blame Heinlein, Clemens, Conroy and John D. MacDonald for my wordiness.

Good Lord, I give you a compliment and you give me a reading assignment? Fair enough. I'll trust you that far.


Just put blame where it's due. Like most menfolk I take compliments poorly unless there's a "good game" and some back slapping involved. It's our cue that there's hugging involved, but there'shiatting too, so it's OK. Again, blame the Southern upbringing. ;)
 
2014-04-07 11:00:34 AM

Breech Birth: Used to know a radio announcer who always said Wed-nes-day. Lucky for us he died. No one since
has done it.


I do it.  Does that count?

I also say "towel" like "tow-well" and 'picture' like "pick-ture" - just in general say all syllables in words that tend to get amputated in casual speech.  People tend to razz me, but I'm the first one they come to when they need help with a big word.
 
2014-04-07 11:19:22 AM
I pronounce Brittany Spears "Komodo Dragon".
 
2014-04-07 11:29:07 AM

Cynicism101: Barfmaker: Chihuahua.

Spanish is an almost-perfect sound-out language. But it has some different rules than English. English often borrows foreign words and doesn't change the spelling. That's how things go.


Chihuahua is spelled *exactly* the way it's pronounced. English is just nuts. When I was teaching ESL in Italy, I basically told my students to just memorize everything. There is literally no rhyme nor reason unless you have a PhD in the field and even then it's still stupid.

hubiestubert: ginandbacon: hubiestubert: ginandbacon: *snip*

Aw shucks. I'm just a poor Southern boy caught up in Yankeeland, by way of Mizzoura and Texas. Blame Heinlein, Clemens, Conroy and John D. MacDonald for my wordiness.

Good Lord, I give you a compliment and you give me a reading assignment? Fair enough. I'll trust you that far.

Just put blame where it's due. Like most menfolk I take compliments poorly unless there's a "good game" and some back slapping involved. It's our cue that there's hugging involved, but there'shiatting too, so it's OK. Again, blame the Southern upbringing. ;)


Pfft, men ;)
 
2014-04-07 11:47:46 AM

ginandbacon: Cynicism101: Barfmaker: Chihuahua.

Spanish is an almost-perfect sound-out language. But it has some different rules than English. English often borrows foreign words and doesn't change the spelling. That's how things go.

Chihuahua is spelled *exactly* the way it's pronounced. English is just nuts. When I was teaching ESL in Italy, I basically told my students to just memorize everything. There is literally no rhyme nor reason unless you have a PhD in the field and even then it's still stupid.

hubiestubert: ginandbacon: hubiestubert: ginandbacon: *snip*

Aw shucks. I'm just a poor Southern boy caught up in Yankeeland, by way of Mizzoura and Texas. Blame Heinlein, Clemens, Conroy and John D. MacDonald for my wordiness.

Good Lord, I give you a compliment and you give me a reading assignment? Fair enough. I'll trust you that far.

Just put blame where it's due. Like most menfolk I take compliments poorly unless there's a "good game" and some back slapping involved. It's our cue that there's hugging involved, but there'shiatting too, so it's OK. Again, blame the Southern upbringing. ;)

Pfft, men ;)


I was set to do ESL after UMaine Farmington--though that was teaching in Malaysia, and teaching other English teachers. In the mid 90s, the government decided to make the switch to American Standard, as opposed to British Standard. Would have been a very sweet gig, but the galIwas dating had zero interest in heading to Kuala Lumpur for four years. It is one of my largest regrets that I didn't take the job. Australia a hop, skip and a jump, the same for Thailand and Guam--my mother settled there after the divorce--and it would have been a lot of fun. Blood warm water, amazing beaches, and fishing, and room and board covered for the four year contract. "Let's go to New England" she said...

Bitter as a baking soda lollipop on that one still.
 
2014-04-07 12:16:20 PM

hubiestubert: Bitter as a baking soda lollipop


I am so stealing this.
 
2014-04-07 02:47:19 PM

Breech Birth: Used to know a radio announcer who always said Wed-nes-day. Lucky for us he died. No one since
has done it


I've said Wed-nes-day a few times, like when I was learning to read the days of the week.

Zeeba Neighba: People trying to be all cute saying words like "presh" and "delish" make me want to stab myself in the ears.


Ugh, I hate that so much! It makes me cringe.
 
2014-04-07 02:47:25 PM

ginandbacon: hubiestubert: Bitter as a baking soda lollipop

I am so stealing this.


Feel free. My contributions to teh Interwebz. ;)
 
2014-04-07 04:31:07 PM

studebaker hoch: Next up: The vanishing 'T'

Mou'ains. Ki'ens. Isaac New'on.


I didn't even realize I talk like this (it's regional) until I was trying to figure out why "Clinton" sounded so funny when my friend from Pennsylvania said it.  She says the T.   If I try to say all those vanished Ts it feels weird and sounds weirder.  Whatever you're used to, I guess.
 
2014-04-07 08:46:05 PM

EvilEeyore: Go read up your room.

I grew up being told it. Yes, I am PA Dutch.


I don't know for sure how the word came about, but we used "redd". I was told it was short for "ready up the room", so your spelling makes more sense.

/pgh
 
2014-04-07 08:48:52 PM

mllawso: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: I still believe that the English language needs a passive-form informal collective pronoun. I nominate "y'all" because I use it.

You for the singular. Y'all for the collective.

All all y'all need are all the varient's of  "y'all" all y'all've been using. Some of y'all use forms of "y'all" not all y'all use, though I think all y'all'd've used them if all y'all grew up hearing the "y'all"s some of y'all use.


Makes me glad I use yinz ;-)
 
Displayed 30 of 130 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report