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(ABC Action News)   St Petersburg, FL. The only place you own is water front property, but you don't own the dock you've used and water in front of your place for years. For $7,800 you can really own it now   (abcactionnews.com) divider line 13
    More: Florida  
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9867 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Apr 2014 at 12:19 AM (16 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-04 11:27:28 PM
10 votes:
wtf is your headline trying to say subby?

christ, that's a f*cking trainwreck... hence the greenlight.

go figure.
2014-04-04 11:27:56 PM
2 votes:

Benevolent Misanthrope: feckingmorons: No, in many places submerged lands are property of the state and you're only granted access. It is certainly like that in all of Florida (except for ponds and small lakes enclosed by dry land).

So the state hired Coldwell Banker Perlman Realty to sell them all on the open market?

This doesn't smell right to me.


If it is the same case this has been going on for a year or two now. It is either the homeowner or the state that owns the land. A long time ago someone bought submerged lands, but those were vacated by changes in the law.

There is still the occasional case where someone owns a lake in a residential neighborhood that the neighbors have been using for years, or have built a sidewalk or walking trail around. The owner puts up an ugly fence or something to 'persuade' the HOA to buy the lake or pond. I recall a few years ago a guy bought a tax deed (the HOA didn't pay the property tax on their pond) and after several years you can acquire the property if you hold the deed (the deeds are sold for back taxes). So he did. Then he put up a bright pink wooden fence. The HOA evenutally bought the lake for $300K or something (it was assessed at about 12K).

That guy was murdered by his wife's lesbian lover's son because of a bad drug deal a few months later. Karma is a biatch.

If it is reclaimed land it may be a bit murky as 'navigable' waterways belong to the state (or in some cases other governmental jurisdictions- cities, counties, etc) and you can get permission to use them for a dock, but you may never own them.

If this is the case buying them (if you can truly buy them) is probably cheaper than litigating. Which sucks for most everyone except the people who own the submerged land.
2014-04-04 11:01:44 PM
2 votes:

feckingmorons: No, in many places submerged lands are property of the state and you're only granted access. It is certainly like that in all of Florida (except for ponds and small lakes enclosed by dry land).


So the state hired Coldwell Banker Perlman Realty to sell them all on the open market?

This doesn't smell right to me.
2014-04-05 01:37:57 AM
1 votes:
This submission was written by a schizophrenic that I can only assume is the same person who wrote the article.

Homeowners in a quiet St. Petersburg neighborhood are learning someone else could own a piece of their property.

Okay, that's interesting. I wonder what sort of arcane law or ordinance causes this.

The debate is over who owns docks that back up to property on the water.

Oh, so it's sort of a private versus public property deal thing. This could be interesting.

Just about every house on Smacks Bayou backs up to water, many of those houses have docks.

So it's some sort of dock issue.

"They thought that they owned a house and they had the rights to use the dock and whatever is on the water in front of their house. No one knew that submerged land was owned by somebody else," Willis said.

So why don't they own the rights to the dock?

That was until listings popped up on real estate web sites like Zillow that say the dock and submerged land around it is for sale and independent of the property it's adjacent to.

So who owns the rights to the dock and why?

That same lot is listed on Homefinder.com for $7,800 by Perlman Realty.

I already don't give a fark, Andrew Doud, and if you get the chance, you should kill yourself.
2014-04-05 01:22:48 AM
1 votes:

Warthog: Did these people not have property surveys done when they bought?


Most people don't get surveys unless they're doing something at the property boundary, like building a fence.  Even if they receive a survey map with the property, not everyone goes out and measures things.


One thing this story reminds me is how people love the idea of living next to water, but fail to realize the huge number of things that can crop up.  Easements and property boundaries are one major issue.  Next are all of the environmental restrictions that might not show up on the deed or the SPDS report.  Then there are the 100 year storms that turn that cute little brook into a raging river that floods your property.

Then there is the really weird (read: expensive) shiat that could crop up.  Like having a beaver pack set up in the stream running across your yard while using the trees in your wetland or protected buffer for their den.  Which eventually gets the code enforcement officer in your yard (called by that prick next door) who cites you for having an insufficient number of trees per acre in your buffer.  So you spend a ton of money to have a certified arborist approve your replanting effort, which is then chewed back down by the beavers in a few months.  You can't kill the beavers because traps are banned, poison can't be used in the wetland and firearms aren't allowed in the city.  And that prick next door will know if you try, and has the city on speed dial if you succeed.
2014-04-05 01:00:15 AM
1 votes:

feckingmorons: If this is the case buying them (if you can truly buy them) is probably cheaper than litigating. Which sucks for most everyone except the people who own the submerged land.


True. I hate to be *that guy*, but if they only want $7800 for it, and it affects >100 homes, that's $78/home. the HOA should probably just pony up and buy it before someone else does (and decides he/she wants to charge the residents "rent" or something stupid like that)
2014-04-05 12:58:41 AM
1 votes:
Did these people not have property surveys done when they bought?  I can tell you, to the inch, where my fence leaves my yard and crosses into my neighbor's yard.  Something as major as a dock being (or not being) on my land would have stood out like a sore thumb.  And if my survey told me I owned the dock, but I didn't, my title insurer would be getting a call.
2014-04-05 12:42:05 AM
1 votes:
In San Francisco there are hundreds of lots that are submerged in the bay near Candlestick point. Back in the 50's they were going to landfill that part of the bay so developers sold the lots for bargain basement prices before the landfill happened. Well, you know what happened next. Still there are people who own and pay property taxes on those submerged lots.
2014-04-05 12:36:38 AM
1 votes:

feckingmorons: No, in many places submerged lands are property of the state and you're only granted access. It is certainly like that in all of Florida (except for ponds and small lakes enclosed by dry land).


There's two perpetual pissing contests back in my hometown along the shores of Medina Lake.

There's 12ft of elevation between "Lake is full at the spillway" and "lake is full and at the top of the dam".  The "owners" of the lake itself claim that they own the land all the way up to the "lake is full at the top" line but the landowners say no.

If the lake drops below the "full at the spillway" level, the exposed land is "open public land" so you could party on it without trespassing and, in theory, be partying 1 foot from someone's backyard and they couldn't say a thing.
2014-04-05 12:34:17 AM
1 votes:
Same thing happened in my neighborhood, but the road went between the houses and the water. Technically the shallow water next to the road was several buildable lots, so the homeowners across the street bought them and made it an easement, so they wouldn't lose their lakeview. Now it's some nice trees, a big dock, and some fire pits.
2014-04-05 12:31:01 AM
1 votes:
As someone who used to work for a company that makes the tax collection software for the Florida county tax collectors, this sort of BS surprises me ZILCH.

/seriously, if you live there, read up on property tax laws and check your bill
2014-04-05 12:24:45 AM
1 votes:

shanrick: Benevolent Misanthrope: This doesn't smell right to me.

It's Florida.


So, it smells like meth and urine?
2014-04-04 11:36:38 PM
1 votes:

Benevolent Misanthrope: This doesn't smell right to me.


It's Florida.
 
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