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(WTVR)   Check out why scientists around the world are geeking out over a frame and a half of skydiving video   (wtvr.com) divider line 47
    More: Interesting, skydivers, urban explorers  
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5308 clicks; posted to Video » on 03 Apr 2014 at 2:48 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



47 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-04-03 01:47:08 PM  
The announcer chick gave me Norwegian Wood..
 
2014-04-03 01:52:41 PM  
Oh and since this is NRK, you can expect a followup show to be released.... 300 hours of people wandering around in the wilderness, poking things with sticks.
 
2014-04-03 02:54:26 PM  
Followed by the deck video from the four-day trip to Tromso?
 
2014-04-03 03:08:17 PM  
That dude is really lucky he didn't get hit with that rock. I would've been like a bullet through jello.

Amazing catch, though.
 
2014-04-03 03:35:50 PM  

make me some tea: That dude is really lucky he didn't get hit with that rock. I would've been like a bullet through jello.

Amazing catch, though.


But the video is painfully boring to watch all the way through.... Cool, but way too long.
 
2014-04-03 04:20:38 PM  
One would think an airplane would catch one of these things before a skydiver
 
2014-04-03 04:21:28 PM  
Was the only place to watch this video on the edge of his bed in his cramped apartment?  Slow clap.  Well played, Norwegian dude.
 
2014-04-03 04:35:37 PM  

markie_farkie: The announcer chick gave me Norwegian Wood..


It sounds like she's talking dirty to me. I want her to talk dirty to me.
 
2014-04-03 04:39:29 PM  

ko_kyi: One would think an airplane would catch one of these things before a skydiver


Oh please, airplanes don't even have hands.
 
2014-04-03 04:45:38 PM  
Srsly? NINE minutes to see one freakin' frame? Lemme guess: it's a blur too.
 
2014-04-03 04:59:08 PM  
Wouldn't a meteorite be basically white hot at that point in its reentry?

Or, in the case of a meteorite of that particular size, a white hot plasma.
 
2014-04-03 05:00:41 PM  

make me some tea: That dude is really lucky he didn't get hit with that rock. I would've been like a bullet through jello.

Amazing catch, though.


I'm not entirely sure I want to understand that euphemism. ;)

It is an amazing video though - too bad they haven't found it on the ground yet.
 
2014-04-03 05:14:22 PM  
Right after she sees the frames with the meteorite going past she says "Where did it come from?"

>_> biatch where do you thin it came from? SPACE, YOU DUMBASS.
 
2014-04-03 05:26:31 PM  

Skleenar: Wouldn't a meteorite be basically white hot at that point in its reentry?

Or, in the case of a meteorite of that particular size, a white hot plasma.


Uh, no. That's the point.

White hot ones are easy to find on film. This one is not white hot.

Not sure how else to explain it...
 
2014-04-03 05:27:16 PM  
Calling it now; someone packed a rock in with their 'chute...
 
2014-04-03 05:27:39 PM  

ko_kyi: One would think an airplane would catch one of these things before a skydiver



america.aljazeera.com

"We've called this press conference to explain our new theory..."
 
2014-04-03 05:56:56 PM  
hoax
 
2014-04-03 06:00:52 PM  

fatbear: Skleenar: Wouldn't a meteorite be basically white hot at that point in its reentry?

Or, in the case of a meteorite of that particular size, a white hot plasma.

Uh, no. That's the point.

White hot ones are easy to find on film. This one is not white hot.

Not sure how else to explain it...


You might explain to me how a rock could fall from space, through 30 miles of atmosphere, and not be white hot.
 
2014-04-03 06:04:29 PM  

Skleenar: fatbear: Skleenar: Wouldn't a meteorite be basically white hot at that point in its reentry?

Or, in the case of a meteorite of that particular size, a white hot plasma.

Uh, no. That's the point.

White hot ones are easy to find on film. This one is not white hot.

Not sure how else to explain it...

You might explain to me how a rock could fall from space, through 30 miles of atmosphere, and not be white hot.

*

*at least on the surface.

http://www.amsmeteors.org/fireballs/faqf/#9
 
2014-04-03 06:34:37 PM  
I know from my skydiving days that your fellow jumpers would never stuff anything else in your pack. Never ever.
 
2014-04-03 06:46:10 PM  

Mr. Cat Poop: markie_farkie: The announcer chick gave me Norwegian Wood..

It sounds like she's talking dirty to me. I want her to talk dirty to me.


I can only imagine how it would sound, having her yell out that I'm a dirty, dirty boy and need to be punished.

Errr... not that I'd WANT her to. Of course.

/dirty
//dirty dirty
 
2014-04-03 07:04:26 PM  

Skleenar: fatbear: Skleenar: Wouldn't a meteorite be basically white hot at that point in its reentry?

Or, in the case of a meteorite of that particular size, a white hot plasma.

Uh, no. That's the point.

White hot ones are easy to find on film. This one is not white hot.

Not sure how else to explain it...

You might explain to me how a rock could fall from space, through 30 miles of atmosphere, and not be white hot.


Well, I could flip it around and ask you to explain why it *should* be white hot, since most things that travel through our atmosphere at ridiculous speeds aren't white hot. But I'll offer this answer: It's just not big enough or fast enough.

Here are a few examples of very large objects (much larger than the rock in the film) that fall through 99% of the earth's atmosphere at terminal velocity (or faster!) and aren't white hot once they reach skydiving altitudes.

withfriendship.com

l3.yimg.com

www.aerospaceweb.org
 
2014-04-03 08:04:25 PM  

Skleenar: You might explain to me how a rock could fall from space, through 30 miles of atmosphere, and not be white hot.


Being rather small, it slows to terminal velocity fairly quickly.  It then falls through several thousand feet of sub-zero atmosphere.  The cold air rushing past would draw off the heat via convection.

Even on a hot, summer day, falling at 200'/sec can get a bit chilly.  I'm always amazed at women who willingly do a nude jump.

/17 jumps before my back gave out.
 
2014-04-03 08:18:15 PM  

Skleenar: You might explain to me how a rock could fall from space, through 30 miles of atmosphere, and not be white hot.


Before entering the atmosphere, that thing floated around for billions of years in an environment where the temp is several hundred degrees below zero in the shade (and yes, several hundred above in direct sunlight).  I suspect that if one could measure the temp inside the stony asteroids of the Kuiper Belt, the temp would be very close to the ambient temp of the surrounding space, i.e., very close to absolute zero.  Just not enough sunlight that far out to heat them appreciably.

I'd wager it was a stony meteorite (IIRC, most are), and heat transfer is pretty slow in stone.  The outside would heat quickly upon entry in the atmosphere (very much like the ablative tiles on the Space Shuttle), but then that heat would bleed off just as quickly into the windstream as it slows to terminal velocity in the lower atmosphere.
 
2014-04-03 08:19:40 PM  

Badmoodman: Srsly? NINE minutes to see one freakin' frame? Lemme guess: it's a blur too.


Every time the rock is in a new position, that's a frame. There were a number of frames (based the the composite), way more than one or 1.5.

I was expecting them to use the known framerate of the camera to determine the object's speed. Seems like that wouldn't be too difficult to do.
 
jvl
2014-04-03 08:30:11 PM  
Shenanigans.
 
2014-04-03 10:04:47 PM  
underwhelming at best
 
2014-04-03 10:11:17 PM  
Fake.

It's going too slowly.  A rock that big would be moving fast, even low in the atmosphere.
They caught it on TWO cameras, right....
It supposedly happened years ago so of course there is nothing to find now.
Highly improbable to notice something like that in a few frames of action video.  They knew it was there.

And while not proof it didn't happen, a rock that size would have been plainly visible in daylight and and left a train of dust.  Was this reported by anyone?
 
2014-04-04 12:37:20 AM  

studebaker hoch: Fake.

It's going too slowly.  A rock that big would be moving fast, even low in the atmosphere.
They caught it on TWO cameras, right....
It supposedly happened years ago so of course there is nothing to find now.
Highly improbable to notice something like that in a few frames of action video.  They knew it was there.

And while not proof it didn't happen, a rock that size would have been plainly visible in daylight and and left a train of dust.  Was this reported by anyone?


Troll?

One camera, not two.

It *is* moving fast.

A rock that size would be visible from the ground? WTF? You can see an 8 inch rock from two miles away? When was the last time you spent all day staring up at the sky waiting for a meteorite? Have you checked the population density of Norway?

Troll.
 
2014-04-04 02:13:48 AM  
You can see a four inch rock from 50 km away when it hits the atmosphere.

Do you science at all?
 
2014-04-04 03:05:00 AM  
Bleh. 8:30 to see two frames??

TL;DW
 
2014-04-04 03:17:03 AM  

Kuta: Bleh. 8:30 to see two frames??

TL;DW


Looked more like 10 frames actually.
 
2014-04-04 03:41:06 AM  
LOL at all the BS explanations. If small meteors slow down and chill off before hitting the ground, then we would not have meteor showers several times a year. In a meteor shower the meteors are way smaller than this one and they all glow brightly and burn up completely before even reaching the troposphere, much less the ground as this one did. This is most surely a hoax, possibly by someone putting a rock in the pack before the jump as was suggested early on in the thread.
 
2014-04-04 06:40:58 AM  

Alien Robot: LOL at all the BS explanations. If small meteors slow down and chill off before hitting the ground, then we would not have meteor showers several times a year. In a meteor shower the meteors are way smaller than this one and they all glow brightly and burn up completely before even reaching the troposphere, much less the ground as this one did. This is most surely a hoax, possibly by someone putting a rock in the pack before the jump as was suggested early on in the thread.


Look at the expert here. *Rolls eyes* Like, I'm sure all of the scientists excited about this haven't discussed all these things.  I read another article about it (I found on Reddit) and it was very interesting.  You are aware of the concept of terminal velocity, aren't you?

There's very little doubt it's real.
 
2014-04-04 08:09:54 AM  

Skleenar: Wouldn't a meteorite be basically white hot at that point in its reentry?

Or, in the case of a meteorite of that particular size, a white hot plasma.


I didn't watch the whole thing, but I think they were around 1200 feet when it passed.  At that point, it would have bled off most of its speed and should be travelling its terminal velocity--probably a couple hundred miles per hour. Should be able to calculate its speed through the video. Most of the spectacular flaming meteors happen much higher in the atmosphere. By the time they hit 1200 feet, they're already being cooled by the thick, buoyant (relatively speaking) air.
 
2014-04-04 09:55:36 AM  
make me some tea [TotalFark]
2014-04-03 03:08:17 PM


That dude is really lucky he didn't get hit with that rock. I would've been like a bullet through jello.

By this point in it's fall, it has been slowed enough by the atmosphere it would just be a hard hit.
 
2014-04-04 12:50:26 PM  

Skleenar: You might explain to me how a rock could fall from space, through 30 miles of atmosphere, and not be white hot.


First of all, the white hot part of the trip only lasts a few seconds.   During that time, the outside gets white hot, but flakes and chunks fly off and carry that heat away.  The rock is not heated through to white hot, only the outer skin and what doesn't chip away retains any heat at all.  As stated above, it then slows to terminal subsonic velocity and is cooled by the cold air it is falling through.
 
2014-04-04 12:54:07 PM  

Alien Robot: If small meteors slow down and chill off before hitting the ground, then we would not have meteor showers several times a year.


I'd be interested in hearing you expand on this theory.
 
2014-04-04 01:19:54 PM  
FAKE. Not traveling fast enough in and out of frame at full speed. Someone threw it from above Jeez people.
 
2014-04-04 02:13:32 PM  

indy_kid: The outside would heat quickly upon entry in the atmosphere (very much like the ablative tiles on the Space Shuttle), but then that heat would bleed off just as quickly into the windstream as it slows to terminal velocity in the lower atmosphere.


The outside is the part we see in the video.

I thought the Space shuttle used non-ablative ceramics to insulate the vehicle--certainly the ablative method was used on earlier space capsules, though.
 
2014-04-04 02:17:41 PM  

studebaker hoch: You can see a four inch rock from 50 km away when it hits the atmosphere.

Do you science at all?


That's because at very high altitude it is going fast enough to compress the air enough to heat it up.  Once it slows to terminal velocity in the lower atmosphere it stops being hot, and in fact cools down very quickly, so no, you can't see it anymore.

https://what-if.xkcd.com/28/

An entertaining explanation of it.
 
2014-04-04 03:17:04 PM  
foxy_canuck

That's because at very high altitude it is going fast enough to compress the air enough to heat it up.  Once it slows to terminal velocity in the lower atmosphere it stops being hot, and in fact cools down very quickly, so no, you can't see it anymore.

Yes.  Meteors that survive to the ground are moving very slowly.  Gravel-sized meteorite fragments from the Chelyabinsk asteroid were easily recovered after the event because they were either laying on the snow, or buried a few inches below the surface, their location given away by telltale holes.  They landed with almost no kinetic energy left.

But those are small fragments.  The mass increases with the cube of the radius for uniform material, and this is the size of what, a brick maybe?  It would be hauling ass, even though decelerating the whole time.

A rock that size would have been a blazing fireball at night.  I saw a four-inch diameter meteor (at night) once in Arizona, as did people in at least three neighboring states.  Even in daylight, this thing would have been very obvious, left a dust train, and possibly an audible sonic boom.  Nobody saw it, I'm OK with that.  Nobody heard it, either.  Odd (though not impossible) that it could come in totally undetected.

I'm still going with "Fake" for now, though if enough of the scientific community gets on board I might suspend my disbelief.

The odds are astronomical (har har) against this being real and it just doesn't look right.

And the Internet has unfortunately destroyed my faith in video as evidence that something amazing happened if there is no other proof.

I still say the rock is just too big and too slow.  Like trying to see a bomb falling from ten meters away.  It would be a blur for maybe one frame.   (a bomb may be moving faster due to greater mass and aerodynamic shape, but would not have started it's descent to the ground with a delta v of 30 km/s either).

Yet here's this nice pretty rock sailing right by these guys.

I hope I'm wrong.
 
2014-04-04 08:42:59 PM  
They have some seriously weird accents in Richmond Va
 
2014-04-04 09:10:09 PM  

ko_kyi: Alien Robot: If small meteors slow down and chill off before hitting the ground, then we would not have meteor showers several times a year.

I'd be interested in hearing you expand on this theory.


Question: What causes the bright streaks as small meteors burn up in the upper atmosphere during a meteor shower? Where do you think the bright light comes from?

Answer: Small meteors burn up in the upper atmosphere and never reach the troposphere. The bright light is from the meteors as they burn up. They typically don't just rapidly reach terminal velocity and fritter downwards before heating up as has been postulated earlier in the thread. They burn up.

i.huffpost.com
 
2014-04-04 09:12:57 PM  
How did the plane land so damn quick?
 
2014-04-04 10:29:10 PM  

Alien Robot: Answer: Small meteors burn up in the upper atmosphere and never reach the troposphere. The bright light is from the meteors as they burn up. They typically don't just rapidly reach terminal velocity and fritter downwards before heating up as has been postulated earlier in the thread. They burn up


Ah, I see.

So because rice sized meteors burn up, large ones don't give up their impact momentum then fall at terminal velocity?  As they get bigger, the meteors have a surface that increases by the square but mass that increases by the cube, therefore bigger ones actually heat up LESS than small ones, if you consider the average temp of the whole thing.
 
2014-04-04 10:34:08 PM  

studebaker hoch: Do you science at all?


I'm going to use that but modify it to "Do you even science?"
 
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