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(MIT)   Popular Mechanics honors members of the new "maker" tech culture   (alum.mit.edu) divider line 7
    More: Interesting, MIT, Instructables, innovators  
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1694 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Apr 2014 at 1:00 PM (38 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-02 02:05:03 PM  
4 votes:

tillerman35: People: You know, there are a lot of folks around who like to tinker around and make stuff...

Other People: You mean, hobbyists?

People: Yeah, but let's call them "Makers" and pretend nobody ever did that kind of thing before, or at least make it seem like a couple of random new technologies turn it into something completely different from just goofing around in your basement like half the world's been doing since forever.

Other People: "Makers," eh?  It's pure genius!  Alert The Media!



  As the director of a maker space, I admit that the name 'maker' is clunky and awkward. As much as I hate the word, I love what it stands for.
  The difference between 'makers' and 'hobbyists' is communication. Makers are hobbyists that use the internet to communicate, collaborate and share information. I grew up in the pre-internet days. If I wanted to learn something new I either went to the bookstore or the library. Information was scarce and hard to find. Today I just go online and there's a wealth of information. The maker scene is about new ways of learning and sharing. With most school districts cutting art, shop and technology programs the maker movement offers a great way to get the information and support to get started in these fields.
  This sums up the maker scene nicely- I recently got an Arduino microcontroller. On Saturday morning I hooked it up for the first time and started learning the programming language. Today I'm putting the final touches on an Arduino based four axis laser spirograph projector. I ran into some problems, but a few posts on the Arduino forums got me all the help I needed. Fifteen years ago a similarly minor problem would take days or weeks of poring over books and back issues of magazines to solve.
  It's more than just a matter of being impatient to get a project done- when a student can get access to information and support they will make progress in their learning much quicker. They will see their learning turn into results which will keep them interested and wanting to learn more. The maker scene is succeeding where the schools are failing- we are result oriented.
  Community is key. Hobbyists make things- makers make makers!
2014-04-03 08:26:17 AM  
3 votes:

gunther_bumpass: kroonermanblack: God-is-a-Taco: So "maker culture" means doing something that produces a good or service.
We're so engorged with unnecessary jobs (that happen to make the most money) that people need to be commended for this?
These are dark times.

Er, no?  We're so engorged with pointless time-kills that people feel the need to group together and do something they perceive as 'productive' with their time-kills.  Like, instead of wasting hours on fark, or sitting in front of current-reality-show-Z, or playing video games, they tinker and design and build.

And they should be commemnded for doing something human beings only started doing 100,000 years ago.


Who said that?

They are hobbyists. I'm sorry someone shiat in your cereal or if you think it's pretentious or whatever is making you unhappy enough to lash out. It's just a name. I don't think anyone is asking for your approval or commendation.

Depending on how you view the current US, calling people makers is a worthwhile distinction; 99% of the populace consumes and generates nothing IN THEIR DOWN TIME. Here are people who take the same down time most people use to watch Honey Boo Boo, and instead attempt to create things.
2014-04-02 02:09:58 PM  
3 votes:
It used to be that people did things because it interested them.

Nowadays, nobody does anything unless they get to proclaim that they're part of some "movement" or other such nonsense.

I'm not just a guy who fools around with electronics, I'm a "Maker". Worship me like a God.

/bunch of aggrandizing, pretentious, self-important, narcissistic assholes
2014-04-03 11:34:01 AM  
2 votes:

kroonermanblack: Depending on how you view the current US, calling people makers is a worthwhile distinction; 99% of the populace consumes and generates nothing IN THEIR DOWN TIME. Here are people who take the same down time most people use to watch Honey Boo Boo, and instead attempt to create things.


I think that is the correct analysis, and also the source of the somewhat bizarre dislike of 'makers'.

"I'd like a reasonable amount of interesting self-reliance."
2014-04-03 08:17:28 AM  
1 votes:

studebaker hoch: "Maker" culture...right.

It's totally a thing.


At least it's an ethos...


/I like what 'Maker' culture represents, and hope my tech-obsessed 13 year-old follows that path. I also like that the connected nature of it takes activities that used to be isolating and builds community around them. Whatever you're into, there's someone out there that's into it too, and when you bring people that share the same passion together good things happen. That's a great lesson to teach.

//Hoboken MakerBar shout-out!
2014-04-02 02:33:45 PM  
1 votes:

gunther_bumpass: Steampunk.

Oh right- when goths discover brown. We had an antique steam engine club here that operated for years. Their leader and main organizer retired recently and the club may dissolve. I asked on of the members if any of the steampunks were active in the club. He laughed and said that a few of them came to a meeting but left when the tools came out. They didn't want to get their tweed outfits dirty.
2014-04-02 02:25:32 PM  
1 votes:

tillerman35: People: You know, there are a lot of folks around who like to tinker around and make stuff...

Other People: You mean, hobbyists?

People: Yeah, but let's call them "Makers" and pretend nobody ever did that kind of thing before, or at least make it seem like a couple of random new technologies turn it into something completely different from just goofing around in your basement like half the world's been doing since forever.

Other People: "Makers," eh?  It's pure genius!  Alert The Media!


IMHO the maker term is goofy, but it is different from a hobbyist.

Maker = Hobbyist + Open source collaboration.

I have known far too many hobbyists that will die with their secrets before ever sharing them.
 
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