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(NPR)   Institute for The Eradication of Every Last Bit of Pleasure From Life Until You Beg For The Sweet Release of Death calls for Girl Scouts to stop selling cookies   (npr.org ) divider line
    More: Stupid, selling cookies, Girl Scout cookie, frosted flakes, pediatric endocrinologist, Tony the Tiger, nutrition label, cause of death, Robert Lustig  
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5825 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Apr 2014 at 8:53 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-02 12:06:34 PM  

Bunkyb123: My only problem with making kids sell things is that I have often experienced young children I don't know knocking on my door without supervision to sell things for school or scouting, and I've often seen children under 15 in front of stores by themselves selling GS cookies, chocolate bars, etc. Very dangerous practice and it is not safe for them.


What are you planning on doing to them?
 
2014-04-02 12:09:28 PM  

Wangiss: Ker_Thwap: As the parent of a former girl scout, I can tell you the cookie sale is a scam, that teaches the girls nothing positive about community, finances or effort and reward efficiency.  It teaches them to get fat, and that their parents will do lots of free work for minimal gain.

No, I'm pretty sure you taught them that.


I'm pretty sure I taught them about the importance of community, financial responsibility, effort and reward.  Is that what you were referring to?  My now adult children are neither fat, nor expect others to do their work for them.  Why would you assume the opposite based on my simple statement?  Just trying to be contrary?
 
2014-04-02 12:14:33 PM  
Sell better cookies, and I might buy some, you little twats.
 
2014-04-02 12:21:30 PM  
Good. Stop with donating to the corporations and start donating to the troops directly.
 
2014-04-02 12:27:25 PM  

Alassra: /gets up on her Girl Scout soapbox:
- Keebler is one of the official bakers for Girl Scout cookies; however, there are a few "slight" formulation changes in the ones on the shelves in the store versus what the GSUSA and Councils sell, so when you savor that Grasshopper, you are savoring a Thin Mint (more or less).

- There are TWO bakeries for Girl Scout cookies in the US -- ABC and Little Brownies; there are some standard cookies and then there are variations (e.g. Thin Mints / Tagalongs versus Thank U Berry Munch and Thanks A Lot)

- The purpose of the sale is to focus on running a small business (where traditionally in many industries, the profit margin is small -- for example, my 8th graders made 70 cents on a 4 dollar box of cookies -- in some industries, that's not a small profit, but it's not 100% - you have to pay the baker, the packagers, the shippers, the marketers, etc. -- this is a great learning experience) not the cookies - it teaches Product Knowledge, Customer Service, Money Management, Budgeting, Safety, etc. The cookies are vehicle (it could be replaced with anything easily)

- Girl Scouts gives opportunities to many girls who otherwise, wouldn't be able to go places or do things and tries to prepare them for life after school - it opens up Scholarship opportunities to them for Leadership; if they opt for the Military and earn the highest award, they can one rank higher (like the Eagle)

- The Eagle and the Gold award are NOT the same or achieved in the same way

- I focus on what my girls want to do and ensure they understand what a trip will cost and how to close that gap through the two product sales that Girl Scouts have with other solutions (that's the point)

- Lemon Oroes are VERY similar to the Lemon Cremes that were sold two years ago

- Everything in moderation, right? It's not the troops fault if you can't be moderate.

- /defensively / When my Troops sell, we actually suggest donations to the Troops overseas or freezing extras. If folks ...


Eh, on an organizational level, what you say makes sense to support the organization.  I wonder however if the organization is still supporting the individual girls through this fundraiser.  It's kind of disingenuous to suggest that it's a small business teaching tool, when the girls aren't doing the work.  At best it prepares the older children who actually pay attention to the process, how to run a soul sucking franchise spun off from a large corporation.  The ideals if the Girl Scouts is still awesome, I'm just not sure if the fundraising efforts are wagging the dog.
 
2014-04-02 12:29:43 PM  
Don't the Girl Scouts only get like 1% of the proceeds? That seems a bigger concern than people's self-control.
 
2014-04-02 12:34:22 PM  

Ker_Thwap: Wangiss: Ker_Thwap: As the parent of a former girl scout, I can tell you the cookie sale is a scam, that teaches the girls nothing positive about community, finances or effort and reward efficiency.  It teaches them to get fat, and that their parents will do lots of free work for minimal gain.

No, I'm pretty sure you taught them that.

I'm pretty sure I taught them about the importance of community, financial responsibility, effort and reward.  Is that what you were referring to?  My now adult children are neither fat, nor expect others to do their work for them.  Why would you assume the opposite based on my simple statement?  Just trying to be contrary?


Oh, I see. Your kids didn't learn the lessons you accused the cookie sales drives of teaching. Right?
 
2014-04-02 12:35:24 PM  
Best Home Movies episode ever.

/need a GIF of McGurk rolling up to the rescue.
 
2014-04-02 12:36:40 PM  
Surprised that Gwyneth Paltrow didn't have something to contribute here...
 
2014-04-02 12:39:25 PM  

Mr. Right: What's the big fuss?  A few cookies now and then aren't going to hurt anybody.  They only sell them for one period a year.  And it's not like you're going to eat too many  - they come in the convenient single-serving containers to prevent over--indulgence.


As the article points out, it's only a few cookies that they want you to enjoy "in moderation". But after that it's Easter candy which Nestle wants you to enjoy "in moderation". Then it's McRib time which is fine as long as it's "in moderation". Dangit, it's already 4th of July time where it would be crazy to not have a ton of BBQ, and rest assured, Cargill and Smithfield think it's fine as long as it's "in moderation". Labor Day is fine too, as long as you're sticking to "moderation". Don't forget to stop in to Hardee's regulary, those 2/3 lb bacon cheeseburgers are completely fine as long you don't have one all the time.

Wow, Thanksgiving already - Tyson says it's OK to gorge on turkey as long as it's "in moderation". Then you have about ten different parties between that and New Year's, where the host insists that all that fatty sugary food won't hurt as long as it's not all the time.

That "in moderation" might work for naturally skinny people, but for the rest of us, it's easier to stick to the steady course.
 
2014-04-02 12:42:33 PM  

Wangiss: Oh, I see. Your kids didn't learn the lessons you accused the cookie sales drives of teaching. Right?


Right.  I have no idea if you have kids or not, but it's pretty simple.  When you notice your child come in contact with something undesirable, you speak with them about it.  It can be as simple as seeing something sexist in a movie, you point out the sexist bit, which often leads to a discussion on the pros and cons of that behavior.  One's kids therefore learn to pay attention to their surroundings, and become intelligent adults who you don't hate.  So, yes, my kids learned a different lesson from cookie sale than the average conformist's child may have learned.
 
2014-04-02 12:47:59 PM  
meh.  it's over-priced hype. at half the price i MIGHT buy some.  for the most part, even the ones I like are just mediocre cookies.  and ive never known what the organization does.  i know Boy Scouts do some actual outdoorsy stuff, giving out badges for accomplishments, etc., but I always thought Girl Scouts were more like a home-ec version of that, getting badges for learning how to vaccuum and do dishes.  i always thought it was kind of an outdated organization.
 
2014-04-02 12:48:33 PM  
I can't eat Girl Scout Cookies for various reasons, but when I come across a troop selling them, I either buy some to give away or I give them a donation of at least $5.00.

Schools used to sell (cement) candy bars to support their sports teams. Various groups held bake sales. Churches and assorted organizations had periodic pancake breakfasts. There are regular chili cook offs -- with many a pot of chili containing ingredients I'd never consider putting in, and hot dog carts are all over some of the major cities.

The Fast Food Industry decided to 'supersize' it's menus decades ago and I've not noticed anyone complaining about those restaurants which offer 'challenges' of 5 pound burgers laden with cheese, eggs, sauces and bacon or an enormous steak served on a platter and not a plate.

Then we have the eating contests where folks pay to watch others cram down anything from chicken wings to hotdogs in a limited amount of time. Don't forget Circus Food, where people go out of the way to strain their brains to find and make whatever hideously calorie laden snack they can dream up and deep fry. From deep friend candy bars to ice cream. Corn dogs aren't exactly a health food either.

So, who is picked on? Girl Scouts, whose seasonal sales of innocuous, traditional cookies supports not only their fine organization, but contributes to their communities. The Girl Scouts has been an honorable organization for decades, teaching many skills.

With innumerable other sources of unhealthy foods out there, many of which are encouraged to create even worse products, the Girl Scouts shouldn't even be on the list.

I think there's a bar which sells a hotdog, wrapped in bacon, wrapped in hamburger, dipped in cornmeal and deep fried. TV sells a device to make bacon cups, encouraging you to eat even more stuff with delicious, unhealthy bacon. Then the popular brands of microwave popcorn, whose solidified oils melt and add flavoring, but whose vapors, if inhaled too often from a steaming bag, can cause a lung disease. That's still on the shelves, unchanged.

With the list of far worse foods steadily growing, I think Girl Scout cookies are the least of our concerns.
 
2014-04-02 12:54:49 PM  
Stop selling Girl Scout Cookies?
ts2.mm.bing.net
 
2014-04-02 12:55:21 PM  

The Flexecutioner: meh.  it's over-priced hype. at half the price i MIGHT buy some.  for the most part, even the ones I like are just mediocre cookies.  and ive never known what the organization does.  i know Boy Scouts do some actual outdoorsy stuff, giving out badges for accomplishments, etc., but I always thought Girl Scouts were more like a home-ec version of that, getting badges for learning how to vaccuum and do dishes.  i always thought it was kind of an outdated organization.


They actually do quite a bit of good.  It's not the 50s anymore, so it's far less home economics, and far more whatever interests the girls and troop leaders.  Yeah, there are stupid "merit badges" like on how to apply makeup, but they also have leadership, athletic, scholastic and yes, even outdoorsy awards.
 
2014-04-02 12:55:29 PM  
Ker_Thwap: Alassra: /gets up on her Girl Scout soapbox:
- Keebler is one of the official bakers for Girl Scout cookies; however, there are a few "slight" formulation changes in the ones on the shelves in the store versus what the GSUSA and Councils sell, so when you savor that Grasshopper, you are savoring a Thin Mint (more or less).

- There are TWO bakeries for Girl Scout cookies in the US -- ABC and Little Brownies; there are some standard cookies and then there are variations (e.g. Thin Mints / Tagalongs versus Thank U Berry Munch and Thanks A Lot)

- The purpose of the sale is to focus on running a small business (where traditionally in many industries, the profit margin is small -- for example, my 8th graders made 70 cents on a 4 dollar box of cookies -- in some industries, that's not a small profit, but it's not 100% - you have to pay the baker, the packagers, the shippers, the marketers, etc. -- this is a great learning experience) not the cookies - it teaches Product Knowledge, Customer Service, Money Management, Budgeting, Safety, etc. The cookies are vehicle (it could be replaced with anything easily)

- Girl Scouts gives opportunities to many girls who otherwise, wouldn't be able to go places or do things and tries to prepare them for life after school - it opens up Scholarship opportunities to them for Leadership; if they opt for the Military and earn the highest award, they can one rank higher (like the Eagle)

- The Eagle and the Gold award are NOT the same or achieved in the same way

- I focus on what my girls want to do and ensure they understand what a trip will cost and how to close that gap through the two product sales that Girl Scouts have with other solutions (that's the point)

- Lemon Oroes are VERY similar to the Lemon Cremes that were sold two years ago

- Everything in moderation, right? It's not the troops fault if you can't be moderate.

- /defensively / When my Troops sell, we actually suggest donations to the Troops overseas or freezing extras. ...

=================
I agree that there are a LOT of parents doing the work of the girls, but again, it's how you prep and coach the girls to execute. I have two Troops and we work hard to coach the GIRLS to do the work (aka "run their business") and plan for what they WANT do with the profits (not my agenda).

Girl Scouts is really decentralized, so what happens in Council X is not necessarily true in Councils Y, Z, F, so I always struggle when there are generalizations made about Girl Scouts. There are some functions that are GSUSA, but almost always, the individual Councils are the ones making the decisions first. This is also something that frustrates volunteers -- we don't even all have the same technology, so if you move from one Council to another, your registration, training, etc., may not even be recognized.

Even still, as long as you keep the focus on the girls, I figure I can't go wrong. I am helping to prepare them for life after high school - no matter what path they take.
 
2014-04-02 01:03:27 PM  
Alassra:

Admittedly, most of my experience with the girl scouts was with the younger girls, which makes me hate the stupid cookie program.  In my town it all kind of broke up as they got older.  It sounds like you're doing well however, and as you said keeping the focus on the kids.
 
2014-04-02 01:33:50 PM  

Ker_Thwap: Wangiss: Oh, I see. Your kids didn't learn the lessons you accused the cookie sales drives of teaching. Right?

Right.  I have no idea if you have kids or not, but it's pretty simple.  When you notice your child come in contact with something undesirable, you speak with them about it.  It can be as simple as seeing something sexist in a movie, you point out the sexist bit, which often leads to a discussion on the pros and cons of that behavior.  One's kids therefore learn to pay attention to their surroundings, and become intelligent adults who you don't hate.  So, yes, my kids learned a different lesson from cookie sale than the average conformist's child may have learned.


Got it. I do have kids. I was just pointing out that if your kids had learned the same lesson you fear other, less engaged parents' children learned from the experience, then it would be your fault just like it's the bad parents' fault. My kids are the best behaved in the neighborhood because, as it sounds you do, I blame myself when they behave badly. When my son (at age 4) got a hold of matches and lit them outside, he got a spanking and enough lecture that he could explain to me in his own words what he did wrong and why he will never do it again. He hasn't given any similar trouble since, but he knows: what will happen if he does; that we're instructing him for his safety and the the safety of those around him; and that we still love him when he makes bad choices. I also know that I failed to teach him in advance about the dangers of things in the house, so now his older sister (age seven) is sharpening and using knives, practicing moving hot things in the oven, and we've had more conversations with all the kids about the various dangerous objects and substances in the house.  I'm glad you're proactively parenting instead of abdicating that responsibility to ANY other group, even one with as lofty goals and ideals as the GSA.
 
2014-04-02 01:37:39 PM  

Ker_Thwap: Alassra:

Admittedly, most of my experience with the girl scouts was with the younger girls, which makes me hate the stupid cookie program.  In my town it all kind of broke up as they got older.  It sounds like you're doing well however, and as you said keeping the focus on the kids.

===============

Those first few years (and especially now that Daisies can sell Cookies) are full of drama llamas and chaos. Folks that suddenly have CASES of cookies who haven't planned well or managed things are overwhelmed. We try to give them training and support to get through that, so that when they get to their Brownie / Junior level, they are seasoned pros.

Usually, those crazy parents don't last (not always). Right now, I am blessed with 10 sets of parents that are awesome and keep the focus on the girls so we don't see as much of that.
 
2014-04-02 02:37:46 PM  

ZeroPly: Mr. Right: What's the big fuss?  A few cookies now and then aren't going to hurt anybody.  They only sell them for one period a year.  And it's not like you're going to eat too many  - they come in the convenient single-serving containers to prevent over--indulgence.

As the article points out, it's only a few cookies that they want you to enjoy "in moderation". But after that it's Easter candy which Nestle wants you to enjoy "in moderation". Then it's McRib time which is fine as long as it's "in moderation". Dangit, it's already 4th of July time where it would be crazy to not have a ton of BBQ, and rest assured, Cargill and Smithfield think it's fine as long as it's "in moderation". Labor Day is fine too, as long as you're sticking to "moderation". Don't forget to stop in to Hardee's regulary, those 2/3 lb bacon cheeseburgers are completely fine as long you don't have one all the time.

Wow, Thanksgiving already - Tyson says it's OK to gorge on turkey as long as it's "in moderation". Then you have about ten different parties between that and New Year's, where the host insists that all that fatty sugary food won't hurt as long as it's not all the time.

That "in moderation" might work for naturally skinny people, but for the rest of us, it's easier to stick to the steady course.


Exercise will solve your dilemma.  Don't have to join a gym, just take a couple-mile walk or hike in the woods 2-3 times a week - that's all you have to do.
 
2014-04-02 02:38:23 PM  
Instead of cookies, perhaps they could sell...

imageshack.com
 
2014-04-02 02:54:18 PM  
I hate girl scout cookies, well, the people who produce them anyway... they use slave labor and violate child labor laws and they make billions...
 
2014-04-02 03:28:59 PM  
Aw helllll no.
 
2014-04-02 03:33:03 PM  

mrlewish: Fark off. Stop questioning peoples right to make choices.

interfering with the corporations' right to make your choices.
 
2014-04-02 04:02:08 PM  
media.tumblr.com
 
2014-04-02 04:45:52 PM  
I tell the idiots in front fo Krogers that the cookies taste like shiat. If I want good cookies, I'll bake them myself.  Or they can join 4H and FFA and learn how to do it themselves.
 
2014-04-03 06:14:32 PM  

Captain PTMB: I will find this doctor, then shoot him in the face with bullets made from my last remaining box of Caramel De-Lites SAMOAS.  Then I will eat my last box of Peanut Butter Sandwiches DO-SI-DO'S while I dance on his grave.  Then I will I eat my last box of the Chocolate covered Peant Butter TAGALONGS while I jog a few miles to burn the calories off.  Then, I will not complain about how Girl Scouts made me fat, because I WAS THE ONE WHO CHOSE TO EAT THE FARKING COOKIES, DR. BLOOMBERG.


Fixed that for you, you poor, benighted soul from the area where the true gustatory glamourbomb of tree-elf-baked cookies sold by girls naming themselves for the Brownie-fae has not yet trod and the heretics of ABC Bakeries still make their own attempts at the One True Cookie Family in the style of John Frum's followers. :D

(Yes, I razz a bit, but I honestly did not know until well into my thirties that Samoas were not referred to as Samoas in a good part of the US.  It also doesn't help things much that the main Keebler plant that is used to make the Samoa-branded/Do-Si-Do-branded/etc. cookies (Little Brownie Bakers) is in fact based in my hometown.  I freely admit to some Hometown Favouritism. :D)

/is weak against Girl Scouts...so weak
//let's just say I knew folks who had to sell 150 boxes of Girl Scout cookies to get to Kings Island...harder than one would think in the 80s
///despairs for modern Scouts as to how the hell they afford to go to camp or Kings Island now by selling cookies since it's hard for them to go door-to-door between no-soliciting rules in HOAs and helicopter parents
 
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