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(Huffington Post)   Triple dog dare you to take the eraser challenge   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 17
    More: Sick, erasers, eraser challenge, middle schools, dogs  
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17984 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Apr 2014 at 1:29 AM (28 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Funniest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-04-01 11:27:36 PM  
18 votes:

Lsherm: Uh, this has been around since the 70's.  But at least we all had our own erasers.


This is true, but overly dismissive. Take as an example marijuana, which many kids today call "reefer" or "grass." This particular drug has been around since the 1940s, and many addicts and enablers today use that to dismiss its continuing existence as a non-issue. "The reefer has been around for generations," they like to say. "Our parents smoked it, and their parents smoked it, too. Why are you only now caring that we want to partake?" And this makes sense, until you consider the implications. See, the reefer back then was nothing more than leaves from the cannabis plant that, when smoked, would cause the smoker to get slightly buzzed. A little silly, a little giggly, a little hungry. It was all good fun, a bit of whacky tomfoolery. But then the Mexicans came along, and they took the reefer and amped it way up, like a mojito. They added all kinds of things to it, chemicals and other drugs and sometimes even sugar. The truth of the matter is that the reefer today's kids are smoking isn't anything like the reefer of their parents. It's super reefer, reefer that's been known to kill within two, three tokes. And it destroys minds, so that the people smoking it can't even see what's happening to them.

It's the same thing with the eraser challenge. Back in the '70s, erasers were still a relatively new technology that relied mostly on plant extracts and natural oils and whale resin. But then whale hunting was outlawed, and plant extracts started getting used as bio fuel. And then China came along with all of its lead mines and cheap labor. The truth is that today's erasers are nothing like the erasers employed by the previous generation, and what was for that generation's elders a harmless, silly game can be for this generation a doorway to cancer, mental disorder, and worse. It's can sound square, I know, to claim that the younger generation should take heed from the mistakes of their elders, but the scary truth of the matter is that our modern society has made being "square" a matter of basic survival.
2014-04-01 11:45:18 PM  
10 votes:

Pocket Ninja: Lsherm: Uh, this has been around since the 70's.  But at least we all had our own erasers.

This is true, but overly dismissive. Take as an example marijuana, which many kids today call "reefer" or "grass." This particular drug has been around since the 1940s, and many addicts and enablers today use that to dismiss its continuing existence as a non-issue. "The reefer has been around for generations," they like to say. "Our parents smoked it, and their parents smoked it, too. Why are you only now caring that we want to partake?" And this makes sense, until you consider the implications. See, the reefer back then was nothing more than leaves from the cannabis plant that, when smoked, would cause the smoker to get slightly buzzed. A little silly, a little giggly, a little hungry. It was all good fun, a bit of whacky tomfoolery. But then the Mexicans came along, and they took the reefer and amped it way up, like a mojito. They added all kinds of things to it, chemicals and other drugs and sometimes even sugar. The truth of the matter is that the reefer today's kids are smoking isn't anything like the reefer of their parents. It's super reefer, reefer that's been known to kill within two, three tokes. And it destroys minds, so that the people smoking it can't even see what's happening to them.

It's the same thing with the eraser challenge. Back in the '70s, erasers were still a relatively new technology that relied mostly on plant extracts and natural oils and whale resin. But then whale hunting was outlawed, and plant extracts started getting used as bio fuel. And then China came along with all of its lead mines and cheap labor. The truth is that today's erasers are nothing like the erasers employed by the previous generation, and what was for that generation's elders a harmless, silly game can be for this generation a doorway to cancer, mental disorder, and worse. It's can sound square, I know, to claim that the younger generation should take heed from the mistakes of ...



Moran. You have been misled by the propaganda film 'Raser Madness
2014-04-02 12:00:40 AM  
5 votes:
Teens today, with their Rainbow Parties and sex bracelets and jenkum! Why can't they just embrace wholesome entertainment like Dungeons and Dragons and comic books like I did as a child??
2014-04-02 02:00:18 AM  
2 votes:

fusillade762: Teens today, with their Rainbow Parties and sex bracelets and jenkum! Why can't they just embrace wholesome entertainment like Dungeons and Dragons and comic books like I did as a child??


media.chick.com
2014-04-02 01:36:59 AM  
2 votes:
"What I found out was kids were sharing erasers, so as they broke the skin they were passing the eraser off to somebody else, body fluids being shared, and that's a concern of mine," Muharem told the outlet.

In my day, it wasn't erasers we were sharing under the bleachers. These Millennials are a sad generation.
2014-04-02 12:08:17 AM  
2 votes:
I'm too busy playing the Knockout Game and Snapchatting my dick to women. Call me when they start rubbing the erasers up against our genitals, then we've got something.
2014-04-02 09:13:39 AM  
1 votes:

Atomic Spunk: When I saw the title, I thought there was going to be some sort of play on the missing "i" in "triple", like the eraser challenge would put you at risk of losing an "i". Oh well.

The games we used to play were quite a bit more dangerous than the eraser challenge. We'd squat down and breath really deeply and quickly for 30 seconds, then we'd quickly stand up and a friend would push into our chest, causing us to pass out. We stopped doing it after one of my friends passed out, hit his head on the sidewalk and started having seizures. That was pretty scary, but my friend didn't have lasting damage.


Well as far as you know... Being a kid, you probably ran like crazy and never talked to the dude again, maybe got your parents to move out of town, change the family name and go into new, unrelated careers. Like the Witness protection Program, but with less cops...
2014-04-02 08:23:48 AM  
1 votes:
My teenager injected only five erasers and became a prostitute.
2014-04-02 07:46:20 AM  
1 votes:
They should start cutting themselves like normal kids.
2014-04-02 07:22:37 AM  
1 votes:
We used a Dremel. The slow kid hit bone once.
2014-04-02 03:54:12 AM  
1 votes:

Danger Avoid Death: Oh. I thought this was going to be something about banging the teacher's erasers together. Do kids still do that, or do they just go straight to banging the teacher?


Classrooms don't use chalkboards anymore. So, no, they have to knock the dust out the old-fashioned way.
2014-04-02 02:55:39 AM  
1 votes:
Snowflakes...

We played a game called Blind the President in middle school.

Not going to go into details but it involved a $20 bill strapped to your wrist and a lit cigarette.

I'm still the only one I know that's ever "won" the game.

Amazing how high your pain threshold can go when on LSD

The scars are still sooooo deep

The 80's were rough
2014-04-02 02:33:56 AM  
1 votes:

Pocket Ninja: Lsherm: Uh, this has been around since the 70's.  But at least we all had our own erasers.

This is true, but overly dismissive. Take as an example marijuana, which many kids today call "reefer" or "grass." This particular drug has been around since the 1940s, and many addicts and enablers today use that to dismiss its continuing existence as a non-issue. "The reefer has been around for generations," they like to say. "Our parents smoked it, and their parents smoked it, too. Why are you only now caring that we want to partake?" And this makes sense, until you consider the implications. See, the reefer back then was nothing more than leaves from the cannabis plant that, when smoked, would cause the smoker to get slightly buzzed. A little silly, a little giggly, a little hungry. It was all good fun, a bit of whacky tomfoolery. But then the Mexicans came along, and they took the reefer and amped it way up, like a mojito. They added all kinds of things to it, chemicals and other drugs and sometimes even sugar. The truth of the matter is that the reefer today's kids are smoking isn't anything like the reefer of their parents. It's super reefer, reefer that's been known to kill within two, three tokes. And it destroys minds, so that the people smoking it can't even see what's happening to them.

It's the same thing with the eraser challenge. Back in the '70s, erasers were still a relatively new technology that relied mostly on plant extracts and natural oils and whale resin. But then whale hunting was outlawed, and plant extracts started getting used as bio fuel. And then China came along with all of its lead mines and cheap labor. The truth is that today's erasers are nothing like the erasers employed by the previous generation, and what was for that generation's elders a harmless, silly game can be for this generation a doorway to cancer, mental disorder, and worse. It's can sound square, I know, to claim that the younger generation should take heed from the mistakes of ...


img1.ak.crunchyroll.com
2014-04-02 02:12:17 AM  
1 votes:

Pattuq: The burned hand teaches best.  Let the idiots rub off their skin if they want to.  Later on, as they wait in discomfort for the injury to heal, they will wonder whether or not it was worth it.  Enough stupid decisions that lead to pain can make even the dumbest kids a little more cautious.

If the sharing of fluids leads to sickness being spread, as they fear, that will also be a harsh lesson.  Some kids need a "holy shiat, I'm mortal!" moment before they wake up and become more mature.  Not all of them, but those who don't won't be erasing their arms in the first place.



From the folds of her gown, she lifted a green metal cube about fifteen centimeters on a side. She turned it and Paul saw that one side was open - black and oddly frightening. Paul slowly put his hand into the box. He first felt a sense of cold as the blackness closed around his hand, then slick metal against his fingers and a prickling as though his hand were asleep...
"What's in the box?"
"Pain." He felt increased tingling in his hand, pressed his lips tightly together. How could this be a test? he wondered. The tingling became an itch... The itch became the faintest burning... It mounted slowly: heat upon heat upon heat... . The burning! The burning! He thought he could feel skin curling black on that agonized hand, the flesh crisping and dropping away until only charred bones remained.
It stopped! As though a switch had been turned off, the pain stopped... "Take your hand from the box, young human, and look at it." He fought down an aching shiver, stared at the lightless void where his hand seemed to remain of its own volition. Memory of pain inhibited every movement. Reason told him he would withdraw a blackened stump from that box. "Do it!" she snapped. He jerked his hand from the box, stared at it astonished. Not a mark. No sign of agony on the flesh. He held up the hand, turned it, flexed the fingers. "Pain by nerve induction," she said. "Can't go around maiming potential humans. There're those who'd give a pretty for the secret of this box, though."
2014-04-02 01:51:48 AM  
1 votes:
FTFA: She said she believes peer pressure could be the propelling force behind the spread of the game.
"They're 13, 14 years old and what's cool takes over sometimes," Murphy said.


Having once been both 13 AND 14 (though not at the same time, amazing though I am), I can confirm that young teens are malleable and stupid, with a desperate need for acceptance from their often even dumber peers.

They'll grow out of it.  And if they're permanently scarred by this, maybe they'll learn a little faster to resist peer pressure.  They'll almost certainly be better for having learned that young.  Shiat, unless kids are WAY different today than they used to be, they're gonna be covered in scars from various outdoor and sport related accidents anyway.  I know I was by the time I hit high school.  Knees, elbows, knuckles, shoulders, eyebrow (I don't even remember how, but I now have a little spot in the middle that won't grow hair because of the scar), animal bite on my ribs, chemical burn scars on my neck and wrist (stupid game with compressed air can), various small and medium scars from oil burns during cooking with uncovered frying pans...and I had a relatively normal and laid back childhood.
2014-04-02 01:35:57 AM  
1 votes:

fusillade762: Teens today, with their Rainbow Parties and sex bracelets and jenkum! Why can't they just embrace wholesome entertainment like Dungeons and Dragons and comic books like I did as a child??


You sound like you hail Satan.
2014-04-02 01:32:51 AM  
1 votes:
What about the Eraserhead Challenge?
 
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