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(Salon)   "We must hate teachers. I've won awards, my kids thrive. But thanks to crazy tests, I'm considered one of the worst teachers in the state because I don't teach to the test, and I'm being shamed by my home state." Well, the tag explains it   (salon.com) divider line 77
    More: Florida, gifted students, won awards, test scores, institutes, field trips  
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2865 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Apr 2014 at 10:40 AM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-01 09:16:06 AM
When my son attended school in Florida, his teachers had to teach how to take the FCATs in order to not get beaten up with low scores.

Judging how good schools are by one standardized test doesn't completely evaluate good schools from bad schools, good teachers from bad teachers.

However, FCAT does show what schools have better funding, and what schools have parents with more money and resources.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2014-04-01 09:44:37 AM
They ought to measure how much money and recourses the parents have.  That would probably predict academic success better than any test.
 
2014-04-01 09:46:58 AM
FTFA:  A media outlet filed a lawsuit to have the right to publish the names and scores of teachers

There's only one answer, then.  Curtail the rights of the press.

:P
 
2014-04-01 10:17:01 AM
You may be a great teacher but you might just want to tone down the self praise just a bit.
 
2014-04-01 10:25:34 AM
He was not a very good carpenter though. Link
 
2014-04-01 10:26:10 AM
Oh hell wrong thread...I need more coffee
 
2014-04-01 10:27:25 AM
NCLB and the spate of tests is exactly why I'm not teaching today.
 
2014-04-01 10:47:41 AM

AirForceVet: When my son attended school in Florida, his teachers had to teach how to take the FCATs in order to not get beaten up with low scores.

Judging how good schools are by one standardized test doesn't completely evaluate good schools from bad schools, good teachers from bad teachers.

However, FCAT does show what schools have better funding, and what schools have parents with more money and resources.


This kind of testing is sweeping the country and all teachers and administrators hate it.  I am not sure who's making money off these tests, but they should be stopped.
 
2014-04-01 10:52:04 AM
I came in to point out that standardized tests are minimum competency tests, and if your students can't pass the damned things then you  aren't a good teacher, whether you "teach the test" or not.  I could have spent every class period declaiming tangentally-related concepts in haiku and students would have fallen into the same distribution (all over the acceptable limit) for the classes I've done.  Teaching the test can screw up actual comprehension, but it doesn't work the other way-- if you give students actual comprehension the test is pretty damned easy.

But it does sound like this teacher is getting shafted on the "improvement" metric, which is essentially statistical noise, so I guess he has a point this time.  Annual improvement in general score makes no sense whatsoever as an analytical metric unless you're... not changing the subject matter from year to year, for some reason.  Which, um... I'd kind of hope you'd do, advancing up the grades and all.
 
2014-04-01 10:54:39 AM

Tellingthem: You may be a great teacher but you might just want to tone down the self praise just a bit.


I once worked with a guy who "won awards" at his last place of employment. He was the most useless individual I've ever met in my life.
 
2014-04-01 10:54:47 AM
The goal of testing-driven "education" is to make people good at repeating what they're told.  Not to think for themselves.
 
2014-04-01 10:59:24 AM

stuhayes2010: AirForceVet: When my son attended school in Florida, his teachers had to teach how to take the FCATs in order to not get beaten up with low scores.

Judging how good schools are by one standardized test doesn't completely evaluate good schools from bad schools, good teachers from bad teachers.

However, FCAT does show what schools have better funding, and what schools have parents with more money and resources.

This kind of testing is sweeping the country and all teachers and administrators hate it.  I am not sure who's making money off these tests, but they should be stopped.


In Mass, there the testing companies are making out like bandits. Which is one of the reasons why we have likewise the MTE, despite the NTEs and Praxis Series which are national standards. You add a layer of testing--and oddly enough, campaign contributions to folks who vote on these sorts of things, you know, for kids--and you get a lovely scent of corruption around the whole of testing. It's a nice way to skim from taxpayers, and tell them that they're getting good value because you can point to numbers which mean kids can take tests, not that they've learned anything useful. It's a bureaucratic layer which doesn't mean a lot, but dang there is a lot of number crunching to say, "some teachers play the game."

And you do have to play the game. With Administrators, with school boards, with parents, with legislators, but the testing craze just adds cost to education, and ties money to folks who play easily, and gives Administrators tools to remove teachers who are a pain in their asses. It's got nothing to do with education, but everything to do with money that can be moved, and lost along the way, and contracts handed out.

Teaching was something I loved, but I'd rather deal with cuts, burns, and dishwashers not coming in, and pain the ass pseudo-vegans who still want cheese, but call their diets "vegan" to their friends, than deal with the crap that my teacher friends have to deal with every damn day. Oddly enough, my special ed training--behavior needs--comes in handy in kitchens fair often, so I don't feel I entirely wasted all those years at school, though I will need to recertified for my Chef 2 at some point soon, but that's test I can at least see real income from...
 
2014-04-01 10:59:53 AM
More than just a Florida problem.

DVDA

My cousin has taught Special Ed for 30 years, he is retiring this year because his evaluations are low because his special ed students can't pass the standardized tests. He teaches High School near Chicago.
 
2014-04-01 11:01:33 AM
Well that was a fun filterpwn.
 
2014-04-01 11:04:33 AM

baconbeard: Tellingthem: You may be a great teacher but you might just want to tone down the self praise just a bit.

I once worked with a guy who "won awards" at his last place of employment. He was the most useless individual I've ever met in my life.


Worked with some "Award Winning" chefs before. One guy took a crap ton of kickbacks from the high end prostitutes who used his place to meet clients and launder money, and another was a mind blowingly self destructive alcoholic who killed his joint one liter of desk vodka at a time*. Awards are nice, but you have to actually run the joint well to get any real respect.

*One of the best chefs I've worked for now owns the spot that Drunken Chef had, and got the place for a song, and has given the new joint to his son, and is doing really well.
 
2014-04-01 11:04:45 AM
Much as most people bristle at "teaching to the test" and the amount of time and effort that goes into it, the general consensus, even among teachers, seems to be that we do need some form of assessment.  Few in the teaching profession, but many who are not, think that pay should be at least in part tied to performance, with "performance" being measured to some degree to correlate with student test data.

On paper, it all looks perfectly reasonable.  In reality, it's simply not possible.  Fervently wanting it to be possible does not negate the fact that it is not possible.  It's not because there are inherently problems in our testing methods, although there are.  It's because teaching is an art form, and we can't measure art.   We can try, but it will only ever be akin to the superficial means we use to try to reduce other intangible qualities to data, and will therefore always be subjective.

weknowmemes.com


I hope she's not an English teacher.
 
2014-04-01 11:19:37 AM
How hard are these tests, really? If you are well versed in the topic would you be able to pass without having been specifically "taught to the test"?
 
2014-04-01 11:21:08 AM

Zeb Hesselgresser: Much as most people bristle at "teaching to the test" and the amount of time and effort that goes into it, the general consensus, even among teachers, seems to be that we do need some form of assessment.  Few in the teaching profession, but many who are not, think that pay should be at least in part tied to performance, with "performance" being measured to some degree to correlate with student test data.

On paper, it all looks perfectly reasonable.  In reality, it's simply not possible.  Fervently wanting it to be possible does not negate the fact that it is not possible.  It's not because there are inherently problems in our testing methods, although there are.  It's because teaching is an art form, and we can't measure art.   We can try, but it will only ever be akin to the superficial means we use to try to reduce other intangible qualities to data, and will therefore always be subjective.

[weknowmemes.com image 240x180]

I hope she's not an English teacher.


Or a science teacher.

How do you choose who to hire if you can't measure teaching? I call BS. I suspect that if I got up and tried to teach a room full of kids, she'd have no problems 'measuring' my (poor) performance.

/Rant: Quality of life, pain, teaching ability, and consciousness itself are all intangibles. The answer isn't "well, we can't directly measure it, so let's not try." The answer is to find things that correlate with each. Yes, this involves some subjective research, but you do it over a large enough group of people that you're not just writing down one person's opinion. Now you have data. It's imperfect, as all data are, but it's something you can use.

Is this person conscious? We can't measure it directly, but brain activity seems to be a pretty good correlate. At least, no-one without a functioning brain has ever claimed to be conscious. We measures of quality of life all the time - should we not try to improve quality of life or reduce pain just because they can't be measured directly? Argh.
 
2014-04-01 11:23:28 AM
Jim_Callahan: I came in to point out that standardized tests are minimum competency tests, and if your students can't pass the damned things then you  aren't a good teacher, whether you "teach the test" or not.  I could have spent every class period declaiming tangentally-related concepts in haiku and students would have fallen into the same distribution (all over the acceptable limit) for the classes I've done.  Teaching the test can screw up actual comprehension, but it doesn't work the other way-- if you give students actual comprehension the test is pretty damned easy.

But it does sound like this teacher is getting shafted on the "improvement" metric, which is essentially statistical noise, so I guess he has a point this time.  Annual improvement in general score makes no sense whatsoever as an analytical metric unless you're... not changing the subject matter from year to year, for some reason.  Which, um... I'd kind of hope you'd do, advancing up the grades and all.


BINGO!

The teachers are always claiming that they want to move on to deeper, more meaningful subjects, but, are restrained from doing this, because of the standardized  competency tests.  Just how the fark do you move on, if someone doesn't understand the foundation principles of the subject.  "We don't need no stinkin' multiplication or division, it's on to trigonometry!"   Actually,that's a bad example.  What teachers want to do, is move to more subjective matters, rather these objective ones.  And of course, the only people qualified to measure these subjective results are other teachers, which degenerates into a, "You're fantastic!  No, you're fantastic!  We're all fantastic  We deserve all a raise!" festival.

/BTW, did this person break her arm patting herself on the back?
 
2014-04-01 11:36:33 AM
My kid didn't test as well in math this year as last year.  Mind you, she still tested in the 99th percentile for her age group, and 3rd in her class, but the overall score was lower than before.  So her teacher and I are having to explain to a 3rd grader about "regression towards the mean" and how this doesn't mean she's "bad at math".
 
2014-04-01 11:41:57 AM

SavageWombat: My kid didn't test as well in math this year as last year.  Mind you, she still tested in the 99th percentile for her age group, and 3rd in her class, but the overall score was lower than before.  So her teacher and I are having to explain to a 3rd grader about "regression towards the mean" and how this doesn't mean she's "bad at math".


Turning a "bad in math" moment into a lesson in math - nice!
 
2014-04-01 11:42:20 AM

Tellingthem: You may be a great teacher but you might just want to tone down the self praise just a bit.


You don't know many teachers, do you?
 
2014-04-01 11:44:59 AM

SavageWombat: My kid didn't test as well in math this year as last year.  Mind you, she still tested in the 99th percentile for her age group, and 3rd in her class, but the overall score was lower than before.  So her teacher and I are having to explain to a 3rd grader about "regression towards the mean" and how this doesn't mean she's "bad at math".



Humblebrag

Subtly letting others now about how fantastic your life is while undercutting it with a bit of self-effacing humor or "woe is me" gloss.

My kid didn't test as well in math this year as last year.  Mind you, she still tested in the 99th percentile for her age group, and 3rd in her class, but the overall score was lower than before.  So her teacher and I are having to explain to a 3rd grader about "regression towards the mean" and how this doesn't mean she's "bad at math".
 
2014-04-01 11:45:01 AM

Needlessly Complicated: How hard are these tests, really? If you are well versed in the topic would you be able to pass without having been specifically "taught to the test"?


Not terribly difficult if you're from a family that supports and prioritizes education, attend a well-funded school, have proper nutrition, are from the same cultural background as the testmakers, speak English as your first language, and don't have a learning disability. Unfortunately that describes very few students in the city school system in which I teach.

I used to teach at a private school, and very few of my students had problems with these tests. Now...
Teachers are villians in THE Ohio too. Especially the ones who work in the poorest districts with the kids who need the most help. Good times.
 
2014-04-01 11:48:15 AM

Needlessly Complicated: How hard are these tests, really? If you are well versed in the topic would you be able to pass without having been specifically "taught to the test"?


The issue isn't the difficulty of the tests, exactly. I'll use the FCAT as an example.
The kids we tutored (after school program) fell into the "must pass basic reading by 3rd grade or repeat" - seems a fair goal. However? The material they were given fell into "rote memorization" rather than the "read for context" approach.  So? You may recognize a word, and be able to spell it, but teaching to the test left a few of them (non-native but fluent speakers) crippled in putting it to use effectively.

There were more than a few that attended the same school, same level, same assignments. They could all read and spell the words - but "use it in a sentence" or "use these ten words in a paragraph"? there were tears - lots of them - which was the other problem

The stress put on the kids, parents and teachers is horrid - the underlying message (and upfront message when they get to high school) is "if you fail, the school fails" - and one of the brightest kids I helped missed her 3rd grade FCAT test day because, after months or prepping she was unable on the day due to vomiting and tears.

I blame Jeb Bush for a lot of this bs - follow the money if you are in a mind to google
 
2014-04-01 11:49:06 AM

zimbomba63: The teachers are always claiming that they want to move on to deeper, more meaningful subjects, but, are restrained from doing this, because of the standardized competency tests. Just how the fark do you move on, if someone doesn't understand the foundation principles of the subject.


I teach math, and I don't really by that schtick either. What really holds back the exploration of knowledge is allowing students to sign up for classes when they are wholly unprepared for them (teachers have to really dumb things down to prevent the masses from failing), or forcing students to take those classes because graduation requirements and further reasons.
 
2014-04-01 11:53:23 AM

Jim_Callahan: I came in to point out that standardized tests are minimum competency tests, and if your students can't pass the damned things then you  aren't a good teacher, whether you "teach the test" or not.  I could have spent every class period declaiming tangentally-related concepts in haiku and students would have fallen into the same distribution (all over the acceptable limit) for the classes I've done.  Teaching the test can screw up actual comprehension, but it doesn't work the other way-- if you give students actual comprehension the test is pretty damned easy.

But it does sound like this teacher is getting shafted on the "improvement" metric, which is essentially statistical noise, so I guess he has a point this time.  Annual improvement in general score makes no sense whatsoever as an analytical metric unless you're... not changing the subject matter from year to year, for some reason.  Which, um... I'd kind of hope you'd do, advancing up the grades and all.


Came to say pretty much this. If someone is that good of a teacher, they wouldn't even have to think about the test.
 
m00
2014-04-01 11:54:29 AM

powhound: I teach math


What level/year?
 
2014-04-01 12:11:03 PM

stuhayes2010: AirForceVet: When my son attended school in Florida, his teachers had to teach how to take the FCATs in order to not get beaten up with low scores.

Judging how good schools are by one standardized test doesn't completely evaluate good schools from bad schools, good teachers from bad teachers.

However, FCAT does show what schools have better funding, and what schools have parents with more money and resources.

This kind of testing is sweeping the country and all teachers and administrators hate it.  I am not sure who's making money off these tests, but they should be stopped.


Lots of fingers on the school reform pie. Actually, there probably isn't much pie left in there. Just a huge multiplayer thumbwar between headgefund managers, billionaires, land developers, book publishers, test designers, union busters, charter schoolers, and etc etc.
 
2014-04-01 12:15:16 PM

vpb: They ought to measure how much money and recourses the parents have.  That would probably predict academic success better than any test.


So we should spend less on schools, and lower tax rates so moms and dads have more money?
 
2014-04-01 12:15:54 PM

Tellingthem: You may be a great teacher but you might just want to tone down the self praise just a bit.


Why? Evidently, nobody else is going to do it.
 
2014-04-01 12:21:21 PM
cdn1.sbnation.com
I FEEL LIKE I'M TAKING CRAZY TESTS!
 
2014-04-01 12:21:31 PM
I was a math teacher, for one year. I have done all the biatching I can stand about the topic, the short story is American schooling is going downhill and charter schools (for-profit public fund gobblers) are fast-tracking that downhill slide.

And the problem is essentially a cultural problem. We have no respect for teachers and education. We say things like "those who can't do, teach". Teachers are among the country's lowest paid college-educated professionals, leading to a very high turnover rate. Teachers are also expected to complete lots of paperwork on their own time, the most ridiculous of which I found the self-evaluations (rate yourself in this area and write down suggestions for your own improvement).

Pardon me, I have to get out of here before I get lost in a biatchfest. I seriously just received one more email from a recruiter, I'll throw it in the trash bin with the other 1000 offers I got this week.

You know it's bad when they have recruiters whose job it is to talk you into coming back.
 
2014-04-01 12:22:54 PM

hubiestubert: NCLB and the spate of tests is exactly why I'm not teaching today.


I'm not doing it because the little bastards are assigned. I liked university Student Affairs, where most of the students I dealt with were the brightest and most capable by default. And I could pick who I wanted to work with most.

/no, there were no student affairs. That's a firing offense, sonny.
//getting away with dating students was very much based on what office you worked in and whether you had a shady boss who would look the other way.
///Professors, of course, are a whole other bundle of crap
 
2014-04-01 12:25:35 PM

BMFPitt: Jim_Callahan: I came in to point out that standardized tests are minimum competency tests, and if your students can't pass the damned things then you  aren't a good teacher, whether you "teach the test" or not.  I could have spent every class period declaiming tangentally-related concepts in haiku and students would have fallen into the same distribution (all over the acceptable limit) for the classes I've done.  Teaching the test can screw up actual comprehension, but it doesn't work the other way-- if you give students actual comprehension the test is pretty damned easy.

But it does sound like this teacher is getting shafted on the "improvement" metric, which is essentially statistical noise, so I guess he has a point this time.  Annual improvement in general score makes no sense whatsoever as an analytical metric unless you're... not changing the subject matter from year to year, for some reason.  Which, um... I'd kind of hope you'd do, advancing up the grades and all.

Came to say pretty much this. If someone is that good of a teacher, they wouldn't even have to think about the test.


Hahahaaa, the two of you sound like you have zero experience in education.
 
2014-04-01 12:33:44 PM

baconbeard: Tellingthem: You may be a great teacher but you might just want to tone down the self praise just a bit.

I once worked with a guy who "won awards" at his last place of employment. He was the most useless individual I've ever met in my life.


But he's probably not a teacher. See, in teaching, you can tell that someone is good because he has awards, but there is no way to tell if someone is bad, because you just can't measure teachers. Or something like that. I think that's what her blog says. I hope there's not a test on that, because now I'm confused.
 
2014-04-01 12:36:20 PM

Nutsac_Jim: vpb: They ought to measure how much money and recourses the parents have.  That would probably predict academic success better than any test.

So we should spend less on schools, and lower tax rates so moms and dads have more money?


No, he's talking about grouping the kids along socioeconomic lines to show possible causes of success. Like someone else in the thread already pointed out, the teacher has less to do with high scores of students than the parents' background does.

This is because different people have different attitudes toward education. Asians as a group, place a high value on high achievement. Whites as a group, place a higher value on achievement but also on personal happiness. Southern blacks as a group have a mistrust of educational systems and black students are more likely to experience poverty at home. Hispanic students are more likely to experience poverty and a language gap.

So if you're a teacher in a school with 90% black and Hispanic students, you have been royally screwed by the system. The new tests that measure students's progress from one year to the next might help, but we really should be looking toward countries with successful programs rather than doubling down on testing which has already been shown to waste time and not improve our international standings.
 
2014-04-01 12:43:30 PM

JNowe: Tellingthem: You may be a great teacher but you might just want to tone down the self praise just a bit.

You don't know many teachers, do you?


Heh...come from a family of them

brimed03: Tellingthem: You may be a great teacher but you might just want to tone down the self praise just a bit.

Why? Evidently, nobody else is going to do it.


"and was immediately acclaimed" "I have been greatly moved and honored to win numerous awards and been nominated for more still." " leaving them running to the administration to sing my praises." "Two years ago, I was lauded "

Sounds like plenty of people have been praising her. I'm just saying that when you make a big deal at how great you are you tend to turn people off of the message.
 
2014-04-01 12:50:50 PM

baconbeard: Tellingthem: You may be a great teacher but you might just want to tone down the self praise just a bit.

I once worked with a guy who "won awards" at his last place of employment. He was the most useless individual I've ever met in my life.


There is that. In fifteen years of higher ed Student Affairs work I never won an award. But I had at least five students who, as alumns, continue to donate money to the school in my name, and three who followed me into the profession.

I'm not aware that many of my award-winning former colleagues can lay claim to that.
 
2014-04-01 12:52:03 PM

Needlessly Complicated: How hard are these tests, really? If you are well versed in the topic would you be able to pass without having been specifically "taught to the test"?


Ironically, they're needlessly complicated.

/I kid
 
2014-04-01 12:53:16 PM

Cerebral Ballsy: Nutsac_Jim: vpb: They ought to measure how much money and recourses the parents have.  That would probably predict academic success better than any test.

So we should spend less on schools, and lower tax rates so moms and dads have more money?

No, he's talking about grouping the kids along socioeconomic lines to show possible causes of success. Like someone else in the thread already pointed out, the teacher has less to do with high scores of students than the parents' background does.

This is because different people have different attitudes toward education. Asians as a group, place a high value on high achievement. Whites as a group, place a higher value on achievement but also on personal happiness. Southern blacks as a group have a mistrust of educational systems and black students are more likely to experience poverty at home. Hispanic students are more likely to experience poverty and a language gap.

So if you're a teacher in a school with 90% black and Hispanic students, you have been royally screwed by the system. The new tests that measure students's progress from one year to the next might help, but we really should be looking toward countries with successful programs rather than doubling down on testing which has already been shown to waste time and not improve our international standings.


I will add this - and it is not directed at you -

Some students are also being royally screwed by black and hispanic teachers who fight tooth and nail against parents.
I've seen this played out in several ways:

1 - Homework assignments with spelling and grammar errors - and students who have to be then told yes, their teacher's examples/instructions are wrong - and yes, they have to "not learn" that.
2 - A memorable interlude between VERY involved parent and a teacher who was so bad she ended up being fired mid-year - a rarity. The child who was branded "learning challenged" was subsequently enrolled in a gifted program
3 - My own kid's Math teacher - who called me at work to ask what he should do? When I mentioned it was his class and he was, presumably, educated for that position, he broke out into tears and spent 5 hate-spewing minutes describing why he was just not able to handle his class - they didn't "listen" - it was the first time I understood why my son had complained his math teacher "didn't actually speak English" - something I admonished him for. (wrongly)

To be somewhat equitable, blaming bad parents OR bad teachers OR bad students OR bad tests OR bad budgets is a miniature version of the compartmentalized approach the nation seems to be taking on just about every issue on the table. It gets nowhere fast for anyone other than those that see budgets ripe for the taking.
 
2014-04-01 12:57:49 PM

m00: powhound: I teach math

What level/year?


Algebra/PreCalc/Concurrent (1010/1050/1060) / 9-12

So, our principal gets on us for too many A's and too many F's (the inverse bell curve). The problem is, in a class like PreCalc, any kid is allowed to sign into it (no prior class or signature requirements). This figuratively creates that inverse bell. I have a 25-30% drop rate by the end of the second quarter, so I can actually start challenging the remaining students a bit more.
 
2014-04-01 01:00:50 PM

JNowe: Tellingthem: You may be a great teacher but you might just want to tone down the self praise just a bit.

You don't know many teachers, do you?


I do. And you're a fool if you think anyone else is going to stand up and do it for them.

So your solution is-- what? They should stay quiet while they get trashed by sellers of standardized testing and right-wingers who assume it's still okay to badmouth and underpay teachers because, at heart, right wingers think all teachers are women (and a few gay men) and, at heart, right wingers are misogynists (and gay bashers)?
//watch out for those run-on sentences
 
2014-04-01 01:03:11 PM

powhound: I don't really by that schtick either.


That would be BUY.
When my students complain about the math, I threaten them with enguish lessons
 
2014-04-01 01:03:38 PM

baconbeard: SavageWombat: My kid didn't test as well in math this year as last year.  Mind you, she still tested in the 99th percentile for her age group, and 3rd in her class, but the overall score was lower than before.  So her teacher and I are having to explain to a 3rd grader about "regression towards the mean" and how this doesn't mean she's "bad at math".


Humblebrag

Subtly letting others now about how fantastic your life is while undercutting it with a bit of self-effacing humor or "woe is me" gloss.

My kid didn't test as well in math this year as last year.  Mind you, she still tested in the 99th percentile for her age group, and 3rd in her class, but the overall score was lower than before.  So her teacher and I are having to explain to a 3rd grader about "regression towards the mean" and how this doesn't mean she's "bad at math".


So you learned a trendy new word on Urban Dictionary! Yayyy!

That doesn't make every example story you read a humblebrag, dumbass.

/just because you got a shiny new hammer, doesn't mean everything you see is a nail
 
2014-04-01 01:04:37 PM
In a state where 40 percent of students pass the fifth-grade science test, 100 percent of my students passed; but no one (at the state level) cares about science scores.

media.tumblr.com

And people wonder why this country is going to hell in a hand-basket.  Keep those kids addicted to Honey Boo Boo and eating McDonald's so they can't contribute to the development of our nation.
 
2014-04-01 01:09:50 PM
Well, welcome to the real world where the company and the managers decide what the employees should be doing and how they should do it. Just because you work as a teacher doesn't mean you get get to do your job the way you want. Ask any wage slave out there if they think they know better how their job should be done and the answer will be yes. What makes you so special that you think you should get to do whatever you want.
 
2014-04-01 01:12:50 PM

huWIEstubert: NCLB and the spate of tests is exactly why I'm not teaching today.


Yeah, that's why I decided to go for two years and get my severe/moderate Special Ed credential instead of a one-year multiple subjects credential.  Special Ed is demanding, but it's the kind of work I did while paying my way through college, I have an affinity for it, and the only test anyone has to pass is basically "is the child still in one piece and well-cared for?"  It's accepted in this field that children are going to progress at wildly varying rates, so you can do what's best for them instead of teaching them to jump through test hoops.
 
2014-04-01 01:28:40 PM

Nutsac_Jim: vpb: They ought to measure how much money and recourses the parents have.  That would probably predict academic success better than any test.

So we should spend less on schools, and lower tax rates so moms and dads have more money?


I see you didn't go to a school in a district with affluent and connected parents.
 
2014-04-01 01:30:03 PM
Several days worth of incredibly dull (and more than a bit stressful) testing that has no bearing whatsoever on the students' grades, and you expect the kids to put forth the effort to do well on these it-doesn't-make-a-difference-tests? And you use the results as a metric to evaluate teacher/school performance and future funding?


Somebody didn't think this through.
 
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