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(LA Times)   Well-educated millennial feels cheated working as a nanny, badgers six-year-old who complained about her homework thus: "You must study hard so you can grow up to be a nanny"   (latimes.com) divider line 82
    More: Obvious, nanny, preschool teacher, labour economics  
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1953 clicks; posted to Business » on 31 Mar 2014 at 7:05 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-31 05:17:21 PM  
Why does a six-year-old badger need a nanny?
 
2014-03-31 05:36:41 PM  
Wow, with that winning attitude I can't imagine why she'd have problems finding a better job.
 
2014-03-31 05:48:08 PM  

fusillade762: Why does a six-year-old badger need a nanny?


If I am ever so wealthy that I can afford a badger and a nanny for that badger, trust me - I am getting that badger a nanny just because I can.
 
2014-03-31 05:48:56 PM  

fusillade762: Why does a six-year-old badger need a nanny?


It's not safe to leave a badger home alone or let it go to the park by itself until it's at least 8.
 
2014-03-31 05:49:30 PM  
You've probably heard about the vast array of problems facing my generation as we graduate and attempt to enter the job market.

Why yes I have, mainly because we e-whine about it endlessly.
 
2014-03-31 06:03:34 PM  

Ambivalence: Wow, with that winning attitude I can't imagine why she'd have problems finding a better job.

But even good day jobs are harder to land than they used to be. When I was in high school, I worked at Trader Joe's. The pay was good, they treated me well and there was plenty of room for promotions and raises. I came home every day happy and tired. Because I hated school, this led to many arguments with my parents about why I needed to do my homework.


That gives her a leg up on some other kids from her generation.  It's not unusual these days for college grads to have no paid work experience at all.
 
2014-03-31 06:05:26 PM  
Studying baboons or being a nanny, at least your working in the same field. A lot of kids can't even say that.
 
2014-03-31 06:59:33 PM  

exick: You've probably heard about the vast array of problems facing my generation as we graduate and attempt to enter the job market.

Why yes I have, mainly because we e-whine about it endlessly.


Admittedly, based on the tales I get out of my parent's generation, they had it both better and worse.

On the one hand, I'm not living in an unheated garage.  Worst I had was rats.
On the other hand, I couldn't get a job making $80K/year in the Midwest as a truck driver with benefits and pension.

But there's DEFINITELY 2 fallacies that I seem to see people making:

1) I'm not nearly as rich as my parents.

Uh yes, they're married in their 40's/50's after 20 years of acquiring wealth, pay raises, and 2 incomes.  Why did you expect this to be the case?

2) I'm not nearly as rich as (other super-rich people, also in their 40-60's, who were smarter/luckier than their parents).

Uh yes, Go see what they did, copy the bits of it that make sense (and honestly, the bits that don't make sense probably don't make sense because you don't see WHY they're doing them), and wait 40 years.

3) Europe is better.

No, no they're not.  For one thing, per-capita incomes are a lot lower (though admittedly, inequality counters out some of that).  And sure, Germany is doing fine, but you also get to compare Germany to Spain, which has 40% youth unemployment http://super-economy.blogspot.com/2010/01/dynamic-america-poor-europe . html.  When FRANCE is as rich as Arkansas, and even after inequality differences, is at best Indiana, Europe sucks.

4) Only people who know other people can get ahead and I don't know any people, so I'm just going to sulk and cry and not even bother trying.

http://thelastpsychiatrist.com/2010/08/this_is_why_the_american_drea m. html

"Scott has got to find somebody who knows someone," the grandfather said, "someone who can get him to the head of the line."

Is this Russia?  This is diabolically terrible advice, it betrays a paranoid, cynical vision of reality where everything is a network, exclusionary, no one is desirable for their talent and the only thing that prevents supersuccess is not being in the right clubs or friendly with the right people.   I get that those things give you an advantage, of course, but does not having them mean a career in holes?

The parents and grandparents, like so many parents today, are disappointed in the boy  because he's not taking their advice, but in fact he is taking their advice all the way to its conclusion: he's holding out for the perfect corporate job.  What they meant to advise him was to improvise towards a career like hopping a creek; but what they taught him to do was wait for the package.


Yeah, that, all of that.  Whole damn thing.
 
2014-03-31 07:03:10 PM  
It will be interesting to see what happens in another decade. The amount of education that will be wasted because of lack of jobs followed by 'well yeah you have a degree but you worked at home depot the 10 years' is going to be pretty astounding.
 
2014-03-31 07:10:46 PM  

Nabb1: fusillade762: Why does a six-year-old badger need a nanny?

If I am ever so wealthy that I can afford a badger and a nanny for that badger, trust me - I am getting that badger a nanny just because I can.


BizarreMan: fusillade762: Why does a six-year-old badger need a nanny?

It's not safe to leave a badger home alone or let it go to the park by itself until it's at least 8.


i1.ytimg.com

Badgers? Badgers?! We don't need no stinking badgers!
 
2014-03-31 07:12:51 PM  

meyerkev: exick: You've probably heard about the vast array of problems facing my generation as we graduate and attempt to enter the job market.

Why yes I have, mainly because we e-whine about it endlessly.

Admittedly, based on the tales I get out of my parent's generation, they had it both better and worse.

On the one hand, I'm not living in an unheated garage.  Worst I had was rats.
On the other hand, I couldn't get a job making $80K/year in the Midwest as a truck driver with benefits and pension.

But there's DEFINITELY 2 fallacies that I seem to see people making:

1) I'm not nearly as rich as my parents.

Uh yes, they're married in their 40's/50's after 20 years of acquiring wealth, pay raises, and 2 incomes.  Why did you expect this to be the case?

2) I'm not nearly as rich as (other super-rich people, also in their 40-60's, who were smarter/luckier than their parents).

Uh yes, Go see what they did, copy the bits of it that make sense (and honestly, the bits that don't make sense probably don't make sense because you don't see WHY they're doing them), and wait 40 years.

3) Europe is better.

No, no they're not.  For one thing, per-capita incomes are a lot lower (though admittedly, inequality counters out some of that).  And sure, Germany is doing fine, but you also get to compare Germany to Spain, which has 40% youth unemployment http://super-economy.blogspot.com/2010/01/dynamic-america-poor-europe . html.  When FRANCE is as rich as Arkansas, and even after inequality differences, is at best Indiana, Europe sucks.

4) Only people who know other people can get ahead and I don't know any people, so I'm just going to sulk and cry and not even bother trying.

http://thelastpsychiatrist.com/2010/08/this_is_why_the_american_drea m. html

"Scott has got to find somebody who knows someone," the grandfather said, "someone who can get him to the head of the line."

Is this Russia?  This is diabolically terrible advice, it betrays a paranoid, cynical vision of reality where everything is a network, exclusionary, no one is desirable for their talent and the only thing that prevents supersuccess is not being in the right clubs or friendly with the right people.   I get that those things give you an advantage, of course, but does not having them mean a career in holes?

The parents and grandparents, like so many parents today, are disappointed in the boy  because he's not taking their advice, but in fact he is taking their advice all the way to its conclusion: he's holding out for the perfect corporate job.  What they meant to advise him was to improvise towards a career like hopping a creek; but what they taught him to do was wait for the package.

Yeah, that, all of that.  Whole damn thing.


I agree with a lot of that but it is a bit different now. Surely some are biatching because they can't afford a Four bedroom house, new car, and a fancy vacation each year. A lot are biatching because they did 4 years of school at 100k or so and now are told to be happy to send out 50 applications and get an offer utilizing none of their skills for next to minimum wage, which won't cover a One bedroom shiat apartment and will require them to be on government benefits. Mean while everyone tells them they are lazy and part of the entitlement class. There are a lot of people that are smart, educated, and want to work. It is a terrible resource to waste.
 
2014-03-31 07:13:49 PM  
FTA:

""To study the social and behavioral sciences is a labor of love," my professor told our graduating class, "because you aren't in it for the money!"

You were warned.  Next!
 
2014-03-31 07:21:42 PM  
Too many parents telling their kids to do what they love. Figure put the markey for your education. If saturated or declining choose your next love. Stop complaining because you chose a major with no career opportunities.
 
2014-03-31 07:35:31 PM  

NickelP: meyerkev: exick: You've probably heard about the vast array of problems facing my generation as we graduate and attempt to enter the job market.

Why yes I have, mainly because we e-whine about it endlessly.

Admittedly, based on the tales I get out of my parent's generation, they had it both better and worse.

On the one hand, I'm not living in an unheated garage.  Worst I had was rats.
On the other hand, I couldn't get a job making $80K/year in the Midwest as a truck driver with benefits and pension.

But there's DEFINITELY 2 fallacies that I seem to see people making:

1) I'm not nearly as rich as my parents.

Uh yes, they're married in their 40's/50's after 20 years of acquiring wealth, pay raises, and 2 incomes.  Why did you expect this to be the case?

2) I'm not nearly as rich as (other super-rich people, also in their 40-60's, who were smarter/luckier than their parents).

Uh yes, Go see what they did, copy the bits of it that make sense (and honestly, the bits that don't make sense probably don't make sense because you don't see WHY they're doing them), and wait 40 years.

3) Europe is better.

No, no they're not.  For one thing, per-capita incomes are a lot lower (though admittedly, inequality counters out some of that).  And sure, Germany is doing fine, but you also get to compare Germany to Spain, which has 40% youth unemployment http://super-economy.blogspot.com/2010/01/dynamic-america-poor-europe . html.  When FRANCE is as rich as Arkansas, and even after inequality differences, is at best Indiana, Europe sucks.

4) Only people who know other people can get ahead and I don't know any people, so I'm just going to sulk and cry and not even bother trying.

http://thelastpsychiatrist.com/2010/08/this_is_why_the_american_drea m. html

"Scott has got to find somebody who knows someone," the grandfather said, "someone who can get him to the head of the line."

Is this Russia?  This is diabolically terrible advice, it betrays a paranoid, cynical vision of reality where everything is a network, exclusionary, no one is desirable for their talent and the only thing that prevents supersuccess is not being in the right clubs or friendly with the right people.   I get that those things give you an advantage, of course, but does not having them mean a career in holes?

The parents and grandparents, like so many parents today, are disappointed in the boy  because he's not taking their advice, but in fact he is taking their advice all the way to its conclusion: he's holding out for the perfect corporate job.  What they meant to advise him was to improvise towards a career like hopping a creek; but what they taught him to do was wait for the package.

Yeah, that, all of that.  Whole damn thing.

I agree with a lot of that but it is a bit different now. Surely some are biatching because they can't afford a Four bedroom house, new car, and a fancy vacation each year. A lot are biatching because they did 4 years of school at 100k or so and now are told to be happy to send out 50 applications and get an offer utilizing none of their skills for next to minimum wage, which won't cover a One bedroom shiat apartment and will require them to be on government benefits. Mean while everyone tells them they are lazy and part of the entitlement class. There are a lot of people that are smart, educated, and want to work. It is a terrible resource to waste.


This one is just biatching she can't find a job.
 
2014-03-31 07:36:19 PM  

fusillade762: Why does a six-year-old badger need a nanny?


Snake, snake, snaaaaake, ooOH it's a snake!
 
2014-03-31 07:37:27 PM  
An American tourist was at the pier of a small coastal Mexican village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked.Inside the small boat were several large yellowfin tuna. The tourist complimented the Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them.The Mexican replied, "Only a little while."The tourist then asked, "Why didn't you stay out longer and catch more fish?"The Mexican said, "With this I have more than enough to support my family's needs."The tourist then asked, "But what do you do with the rest of your time?"The Mexican fisherman said, "I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take siesta with my wife, Maria, stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine and play guitar with my amigos, I have a full and busy life."The tourist scoffed, " I can help you. You should spend more time fishing; and with the proceeds, buy a bigger boat: With the proceeds from the bigger boat you could buy several boats. Eventually you would have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman you would sell directly to the processor; eventually opening your own cannery. You would control the product, processing and distribution. You could leave this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then Los Angeles and eventually New York where you could run your ever-expanding enterprise."The Mexican fisherman asked, "But, how long will this all take?"The tourist replied, "15 to 20 years.""But what then?" asked the Mexican.The tourist laughed and said, "That's the best part. When the time is right you would sell your company stock to the public and become very rich, you would make millions.""Millions?...Then what?"The American said, "Then you would retire. Move to a small coastal fishing village where you would sleep late, fish a little, play with your kids, take siesta with your wife, stroll to the village in the evenings where you could sip wine and play your guitar with your amigos."
 
2014-03-31 07:51:29 PM  

meyerkev: 3) Europe is better.

No, no they're not.  For one thing, per-capita incomes are a lot lower (though admittedly, inequality counters out some of that).  And sure, Germany is doing fine, but you also get to compare Germany to Spain, which has 40% youth unemployment http://super-economy.blogspot.com/2010/01/dynamic-america-poor-europe . html.  When FRANCE is as rich as Arkansas, and even after inequality differences, is at best Indiana, Europe sucks....


You're taking those statistics for more than what they are, and your sucky blog has old data.  By this logic, Qatar is paradise.  I think any of the numerous threads on the World Cup preparations will relieve you of that delusion.

Adjust for inequality and what you get for the money (PPP is a nice back-of-the-envelope calculation, but it ain't the gospel), and France will completely stomp either Arkansas or Indiana.
 
2014-03-31 07:51:55 PM  
My wife is a nanny.  She is college educated and very experienced.  Like with any service, there is a wide array of talents and skill levels available.  She is in the tip top of her field.  She has a definite ceiling on what she is able to earn, largely because of people who don't understand that you get what you pay for.  I am in the same boat; I'm a general building contractor.  I work mostly by myself.  I get undercut by unlicensed/illegal labor.  I have to sell the job rather than the price.  We both do pretty well as we have gotten into circles where our skills are in demand rather than Rosa Vargas con la Espongebob y Jose el Laborer.

It's not that people are lazy or unskilled, it's that most people don't realize the value of good talent.  Corporations certainly don't; they recognize one thing and one thing only: current quarter revenue.

The millenials tens of thousands of dollars in debt got sold a bum deal.  It isn't their fault.  The prosperity gospel is a bunch of shiat and has been since day 1.  Worst part is that they get the short end of the stick again - if you dont have a job, you are stupid or lazy.  I work my ass off as does my wife and we are paycheck to paycheck.  Think we're lazy and or stupid?  You couldnt hang with what we do for an hour.
 
2014-03-31 07:59:45 PM  
Was there ever a time when a social sciences major was your ticket to a lucrative career?
 
2014-03-31 08:00:30 PM  

meyerkev: exick: You've probably heard about the vast array of problems facing my generation as we graduate and attempt to enter the job market.

Why yes I have, mainly because we e-whine about it endlessly.

Admittedly, based on the tales I get out of my parent's generation, they had it both better and worse.

On the one hand, I'm not living in an unheated garage.  Worst I had was rats.
On the other hand, I couldn't get a job making $80K/year in the Midwest as a truck driver with benefits and pension.

But there's DEFINITELY 2 fallacies that I seem to see people making:

1) I'm not nearly as rich as my parents.

Uh yes, they're married in their 40's/50's after 20 years of acquiring wealth, pay raises, and 2 incomes.  Why did you expect this to be the case?

2) I'm not nearly as rich as (other super-rich people, also in their 40-60's, who were smarter/luckier than their parents).

Uh yes, Go see what they did, copy the bits of it that make sense (and honestly, the bits that don't make sense probably don't make sense because you don't see WHY they're doing them), and wait 40 years.

3) Europe is better.

No, no they're not.  For one thing, per-capita incomes are a lot lower (though admittedly, inequality counters out some of that).  And sure, Germany is doing fine, but you also get to compare Germany to Spain, which has 40% youth unemployment http://super-economy.blogspot.com/2010/01/dynamic-america-poor-europe . html.  When FRANCE is as rich as Arkansas, and even after inequality differences, is at best Indiana, Europe sucks.

4) Only people who know other people can get ahead and I don't know any people, so I'm just going to sulk and cry and not even bother trying.

http://thelastpsychiatrist.com/2010/08/this_is_why_the_american_drea m. html

"Scott has got to find somebody who knows someone," the grandfather said, "someone who can get him to the head of the line."

Is this Russia?  This is diabolically terrible advice, it betrays a paranoid, cynical vision of reality where everything is a network, exclusionary, no one is desirable for their talent and the only thing that prevents supersuccess is not being in the right clubs or friendly with the right people.   I get that those things give you an advantage, of course, but does not having them mean a career in holes?

The parents and grandparents, like so many parents today, are disappointed in the boy  because he's not taking their advice, but in fact he is taking their advice all the way to its conclusion: he's holding out for the perfect corporate job.  What they meant to advise him was to improvise towards a career like hopping a creek; but what they taught him to do was wait for the package.

Yeah, that, all of that.  Whole damn thing.


The French may "only" make as much as poor southern Americans, but their quality of life is much much higher.

How many of those Arkansans have six weeks off a year, universal healthcare, access to multiple modes of mass transit, and a diet free of preservatives & corn syrup?

/priorities
 
2014-03-31 08:16:19 PM  
Wait until you hit middle age.  Then the real fun starts.
 
2014-03-31 08:40:20 PM  

Thank You Black Jesus!: She has a definite ceiling on what she is able to earn, largely because of people who don't understand that you get what you pay for. I am in the same boat; I'm a general building contractor. I work mostly by myself. I get undercut by unlicensed/illegal labor. I have to sell the job rather than the price. We both do pretty well as we have gotten into circles where our skills are in demand rather than Rosa Vargas con la Espongebob y Jose el Laborer.


I run into the same crap in my freelance work... people think that being a graphic designer is just a few clicks in Photoship et voila! A masterpiece! As a result I have to compete with their sh*t kid nephew who "knows computers", who then are surprised that people think their business is run by that same sh*t kid when when they use a bunch of misspelled typefaces (including papyrus and Comic Sans) and clip art thrown onto flourescent lime green typing paper by the sh*t kid.

"You do this for fun! Why should I pay you?"
"It's all on the computer, isn't it?"
"Freelance means free, right?"
"I'll pay you when my business takes off!"
"Doesn't matter that I spelled it wrong, I shouldn't have to pay you to correct it!"
"How about a trade? I have free t-shirts."
"Oh we decided to go with someone else after you already worked on this for a month. We'll want our money back."

This is why I do my FL on the side now and work full time for a company. The joys of a steady paycheck, full benefits and free coffee (the good kind) outweigh the hassles of dealing with morans who don't know diddly-sh*t about graphics and know even less about the axiom "you get what you pay for".

/rant over
 
2014-03-31 09:01:57 PM  

MyRandomName: Too many parents telling their kids to do what they love. Figure put the markey for your education. If saturated or declining choose your next love. Stop complaining because you chose a major with no career opportunities.


No, they're not. I have a friend who has a PhD in Virology and Immunology.  She has close to 10 years of lab experience, and used to work in Christchurch, NZ until the constant earthquakes drove her back to San Diego. (Think about that for a second. All the earthquakes in NZ, which damaged her house so much so that the government condemned it, drove her back to a city that has lots of earthquakes.) Because the US federal government has cut its budget so much, she can't find a job. She's working part time at an online college instead. She did all the right things, and she's been out of work for 2 years. But please, tell how kids today feel entitled to do what they love instead of what will pay the bills.
 
2014-03-31 09:03:06 PM  
You are either going to college to learn something that will lead to a career, or you aren't.

If you aren't (Anthropology majors, take note - you aren't), then enjoy having to start at the bottom along with the folks who didn't go to college at all. Or worse, report to the folks who didn't go to college and got a four-year head start working their way up the ladder.
 
2014-03-31 09:09:44 PM  

Mike Chewbacca: MyRandomName: Too many parents telling their kids to do what they love. Figure put the markey for your education. If saturated or declining choose your next love. Stop complaining because you chose a major with no career opportunities.

No, they're not. I have a friend who has a PhD in Virology and Immunology.  She has close to 10 years of lab experience, and used to work in Christchurch, NZ until the constant earthquakes drove her back to San Diego. (Think about that for a second. All the earthquakes in NZ, which damaged her house so much so that the government condemned it, drove her back to a city that has lots of earthquakes.) Because the US federal government has cut its budget so much, she can't find a job. She's working part time at an online college instead. She did all the right things, and she's been out of work for 2 years. But please, tell how kids today feel entitled to do what they love instead of what will pay the bills.


Don't you understand? Poor people are morally inferior to rich people. It's just that simple. Do you think Bill Gates got to where he is today by being poor? Hell no. His father was a prominent lawyer, and his mother served on the board of directors for First Interstate BancSystem and the United Way. Gates's maternal grandfather was JW Maxwell, a national bank president. Of course he became fabulously wealthy well beyond expectations, but that's more a function of the opportunities available to you when you're filthy rich at the start.
 
2014-03-31 09:25:11 PM  
So...you went into "social and behavioral sciences", but you didn't get a PhD. Which means that, right out the gate, your plateau job was probably going to be High School Guidance Counselor. Maybe HR Manager if you got really lucky.

Good job, good effort.
 
2014-03-31 09:30:11 PM  

MyRandomName: Too many parents telling their kids to do what they love. Figure put the markey for your education. If saturated or declining choose your next love. Stop complaining because you chose a major with no career opportunities.


I specifically majored in something I didn't care much about because it was supposed to at least get me a well-paid job after I finished college. Half a decade later I'm in a dead end, wage-burning job, and my parents are offering me money from their retirement savings so I can at least go back to school for a while and study something I like, since it clearly doesn't matter what your degree is in anymore.
 
2014-03-31 09:31:23 PM  

dumbobruni: meyerkev: exick: You've probably heard about the vast array of problems facing my generation as we graduate and attempt to enter the job market.

Why yes I have, mainly because we e-whine about it endlessly.

Admittedly, based on the tales I get out of my parent's generation, they had it both better and worse.

On the one hand, I'm not living in an unheated garage.  Worst I had was rats.
On the other hand, I couldn't get a job making $80K/year in the Midwest as a truck driver with benefits and pension.

But there's DEFINITELY 2 fallacies that I seem to see people making:

1) I'm not nearly as rich as my parents.

Uh yes, they're married in their 40's/50's after 20 years of acquiring wealth, pay raises, and 2 incomes.  Why did you expect this to be the case?

2) I'm not nearly as rich as (other super-rich people, also in their 40-60's, who were smarter/luckier than their parents).

Uh yes, Go see what they did, copy the bits of it that make sense (and honestly, the bits that don't make sense probably don't make sense because you don't see WHY they're doing them), and wait 40 years.

3) Europe is better.

No, no they're not.  For one thing, per-capita incomes are a lot lower (though admittedly, inequality counters out some of that).  And sure, Germany is doing fine, but you also get to compare Germany to Spain, which has 40% youth unemployment http://super-economy.blogspot.com/2010/01/dynamic-america-poor-europe . html.  When FRANCE is as rich as Arkansas, and even after inequality differences, is at best Indiana, Europe sucks.

4) Only people who know other people can get ahead and I don't know any people, so I'm just going to sulk and cry and not even bother trying.

http://thelastpsychiatrist.com/2010/08/this_is_why_the_american_drea m. html

"Scott has got to find somebody who knows someone," the grandfather said, "someone who can get him to the head of the line."

Is this Russia?  This is diabolically terrible advice, it betrays a paranoid, cynical vision of reality where everything is a network, exclusionary, no one is desirable for their talent and the only thing that prevents supersuccess is not being in the right clubs or friendly with the right people.   I get that those things give you an advantage, of course, but does not having them mean a career in holes?

The parents and grandparents, like so many parents today, are disappointed in the boy  because he's not taking their advice, but in fact he is taking their advice all the way to its conclusion: he's holding out for the perfect corporate job.  What they meant to advise him was to improvise towards a career like hopping a creek; but what they taught him to do was wait for the package.

Yeah, that, all of that.  Whole damn thing.

The French may "only" make as much as poor southern Americans, but their quality of life is much much higher.

How many of those Arkansans have six weeks off a year, universal healthcare, access to multiple modes of mass transit, and a diet free of preservatives & corn syrup?

/priorities


Don't forget about the 35 hour work weeks and 2 hour lunches.
 
2014-03-31 09:39:06 PM  

MyRandomName: Too many parents telling their kids to do what they love. Figure put the markey for your education. If saturated or declining choose your next love. Stop complaining because you chose a major with no career opportunities.


lh4.ggpht.com
 
2014-03-31 09:44:33 PM  
Clever bait and switch the Boomers pulled:

'Get an education or you'll be flipping burgers the rest of your life!'

'What, are you too proud to flip burgers for a living??'

Even worse is that the Boomers are too stupid to realize they're merely useful idiots for the 0.1%.
 
2014-03-31 09:50:01 PM  

AngryDragon: FTA:

""To study the social and behavioral sciences is a labor of love," my professor told our graduating class, "because you aren't in it for the money!"

You were warned.  Next!


Yes she took 6 years (assuming 18-12 years of k-12) to finish an undergrad in anthropology with an admittedly mediocre gpa (from the article).  NOBODY, not one person has ever said 'yes get a 4 year degree in anthropology and employers will LOVE it!'  I thought everyone knew that degrees like that only matter if you have a PhD and then pretty much all you can do is teach college.  My wife has a cousin who did just that.  He makes good money as a professor but he is 1 in a thousand.
 
2014-03-31 09:50:10 PM  

TofuTheAlmighty: Clever bait and switch the Boomers pulled:

'Get an education or you'll be flipping burgers the rest of your life!'

'What, are you too proud to flip burgers for a living??'

Even worse is that the Boomers are too stupid to realize they're merely useful idiots for the 0.1%.


They say "Don't hate the player, hate the game.", and then lose their shiat when you hate the game.
 
2014-03-31 10:13:54 PM  
Fark it, dude. Let's go bowling.
 
2014-03-31 10:17:34 PM  
Turns out you cant skip ahead in line.

Just because you dropped a ton of coin on paper, read books and did some projects in your junior and senior years doesn't make you a CEO of an organization or the best researcher in all of the land.

I was talking with someone the other day about this very fact.  Learning shiat takes time.. a long, long, time.  The guys that could put their hand on the dashboard of a car and tell you the speed didn't read that in a book.  They did it long enough that they learned the "midas touch".  It's what most people do in their jobs.  Find ways to make their own lives easier while they're slogging through the shiat part of their work.  Most jobs that people "love" really only enjoy 10% of it.  The rest is shiatty paperwork.

Shunning family businesses and learning the family craft from one generation from the next is also gone the way of the dodo.

Regardless, this article is stupid.  Shame she can't get a job at trader joe's though.  doesn't sound like she has or had a ton of ambition to begin with.
 
2014-03-31 10:20:36 PM  

browser_snake: You are either going to college to learn something that will lead to a career, or you aren't.

If you aren't (Anthropology majors, take note - you aren't), then enjoy having to start at the bottom along with the folks who didn't go to college at all. Or worse, report to the folks who didn't go to college and got a four-year head start working their way up the ladder.


My first job out of college my boss wasn't a college graduate.  My second boss wasn't a college graduate.  My third boss was, my fourth boss wasn't...you get the picture.  I'm not saying college is worthless or a bad investment but there were a few people there who started at the age where a lot of their peers were in college and after putting in the time and effort got promoted...ironically, those same people now are in a place where they've hit a ceiling as far as things go because that company got sold to a different companies that require a degree for certain levels of positions.
I would never suggest that a person should not go to college because there isn't a guarantee of employment but the school of thought that graduation automatically comes with job offers is a dangerous and expensive attitude to have going into college.  The thought that people should saddle themselves with tons of debt with no realistic means to pay it back is something I haven't figured it out...a person wouldn't get a mortgage with no job and no idea of how they were going to pay for the house but for some reason as a society we encourage 18 year old kids to go to college because they're supposed to and not because they should have a clear idea of why they are going to college in the first place.
 
2014-03-31 10:28:39 PM  
The world needs nannies too.
 
2014-03-31 10:45:50 PM  
My undergrads are STEM majors from a Top 50 engineering school, and in the past 5-10 years it has not been unusual for them to have to do a stint at Panera or some other soulless retail slop while trying to get into a job where they could actually provide the value they had hoped during their studies.  That's not even getting into the "we'll pay you $30k for 3-5 years of engineering experience" horsecrap.

When is the last time you really had a discussion with a recent graduate about their opportunities?  Most want to work.  They want to bust their asses and make something happen.  Stop kicking 'em while they're down in this messed up macroeconomic situation.

/The STEM "shortage" is a falsehood perpetuated by companies trying to depress wages for skilled, intelligent Americans.
 
2014-03-31 11:06:56 PM  
"To study the social and behavioral sciences is a labor of love," my professor told our graduating class, "because you aren't in it for the money!"

So, you were fairly warned.  What's the problem?

This is how they explained it: If you go to college, you can do whatever you want with your life.

Oh, I see.  Your parents were morons.
 
2014-03-31 11:12:15 PM  

Bith Set Me Up: Nabb1: fusillade762: Why does a six-year-old badger need a nanny?

If I am ever so wealthy that I can afford a badger and a nanny for that badger, trust me - I am getting that badger a nanny just because I can.

BizarreMan: fusillade762: Why does a six-year-old badger need a nanny?

It's not safe to leave a badger home alone or let it go to the park by itself until it's at least 8.

[i1.ytimg.com image 480x360]

Badgers? Badgers?! We don't need no stinking badgers!


Here ya go...

img.fark.net
 
2014-03-31 11:29:17 PM  
It's so unfair because all the anthropology majors of your parent's generation got lucrative jobs studying baboons in Namibia, right?  Oh wait, no.  Maybe it's just that they chose sensible careers that were valued by the society they live in.
 
2014-03-31 11:34:42 PM  

Rapmaster2000: Was there ever a time when a social sciences major was your ticket to a lucrative career?




Alan Greenspan got a degree in economics and was chairman of the Federal Reserve for 18 years.
 
2014-03-31 11:44:45 PM  
images.askmen.com
 
2014-03-31 11:55:02 PM  

dumbobruni: The French may "only" make as much as poor southern Americans, but their quality of life is much much higher.



Actually, according to the subjective Quality of Life Index compiled for all nations, the U.S. scores higher than France. This index takes into account  - "Life expectancy, Family life, Community life, Material well being, Job security, Political freedom, and Gender equality."

Also note that the criteria for this index are chosen, defined and evaluated by a European organization based in Europe. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quality-of-Life_Index

i62.tinypic.com
It's a myth that most other people in the world are somehow "much much" better off than Americans.
 
2014-04-01 12:20:11 AM  
I guess I'm lucky being a gen-xer that I have a job as an IT manager at a company I love.

Oh wait, that's right, when I was 24 I was working as a bill collector for a little over minimum wage.

/suck it up nancies
 
2014-04-01 12:24:10 AM  

ThrobblefootSpectre: It's so unfair because all the anthropology majors of your parent's generation got lucrative jobs studying baboons in Namibia, right?  Oh wait, no.  Maybe it's just that they chose sensible careers that were valued by the society they live in.


And here lies the unanswered question. What happened in our society that made other careers less valued by that society? Used to be that people went to university not as job training but to LEARN about the world, and for each individual to learn about themselves and their place in that world. Over the past generation or so employers have sloughed off their responsibility to train the people they hire, leaving it to those potential hires to do it themselves - at their own time and expense.

Technology changes, society changes, and what businesses want changes, and it all happens very, very fast. That is precisely the reason why you need to do what it is you want to do, because from the time you leave high school until you get your degree is a long time, not like your parents day when going from rotary to touch tone phones took decades. Their "sensible" (which also happened to be what they were interested in) degree lasted for an entire career, many times with only one company. That sh*t is long gone, and there's not enough time or money in anyone's life to get all the degrees they might need to keep up over a 50 or 60 year work life.

Fortunately my Graphic Design degrees got me where I am today... but this is something I WANTED TO DO and would never have put as much effort into it had I not been interested. That's the difference here... you seem to want a world of mediocre engineers, piss-poor coders and people who only chose their majors because their parents told them those were the only ones they would pay for. I would rather they do something else they liked, and leave those positions for the people want to do them. I want my doctors to want to be doctors, my lawyers to want to be a lawyers, my scientists to want to be a scientists, and my musicians to want to be musicians.

If you're going to bust your ass and pay through the nose to get that paper, you had better want it. If you don't, it's a waste of both your life and your money.

One more thing... if there is something "sensible" you as an employer want me to do, them maybe you should cough up the farking money to train me to do it. As long as that fee is coming out of MY pocket and not yours, I will spend it on what I wish, and not what you desire. This society is making a serious error when all the value they see in a particular course of study is how much money can be made.
 
2014-04-01 12:37:11 AM  

John Nash: I guess I'm lucky being a gen-xer that I have a job as an IT manager at a company I love.

Oh wait, that's right, when I was 24 I was working as a bill collector for a little over minimum wage.

/suck it up nancies


You sound white, and male.
 
2014-04-01 12:41:06 AM  
The irony is that I also graduated last May with a degree and was all set to go to Nambia to be a badger nanny, but now I'm stuck farming baby baboons who are going to be used to phase out workers at Trader Joe's.
 
2014-04-01 12:59:51 AM  

sendtodave: John Nash: I guess I'm lucky being a gen-xer that I have a job as an IT manager at a company I love.

Oh wait, that's right, when I was 24 I was working as a bill collector for a little over minimum wage.

/suck it up nancies

You sound white, and male.


That's funny Dave, you sound like a middle-eastern hermaphrodite.
 
2014-04-01 01:00:30 AM  
There's always porn cupcake.
 
2014-04-01 01:15:21 AM  

John Nash: sendtodave: John Nash: I guess I'm lucky being a gen-xer that I have a job as an IT manager at a company I love.

Oh wait, that's right, when I was 24 I was working as a bill collector for a little over minimum wage.

/suck it up nancies

You sound white, and male.

That's funny Dave, you sound like a middle-eastern hermaphrodite.


Oh, no, I'm a total cracker, who also went from low wages to solid middle class in the same time frame.

But I don't presume to be a self-made cracker.
 
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