Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Smithsonian Magazine)   If expiration dates are so meaningless, why do companies bother to use them? Short answer: Lawyers. Long answer: Laaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaawyers   (smithsonianmag.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious  
•       •       •

2922 clicks; posted to Business » on 30 Mar 2014 at 7:59 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



88 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-03-30 04:13:07 PM  
According to the article, lawyers had little to do with it. Customers feel better if there is a date on the food to reassure them.
 
2014-03-30 04:47:06 PM  
As someone who, just this week, food-poisoned herself after eating some spring mix all of one day after the expiration date, may I just say that I respect expiration dates very much. They also help us to use our products in the order in which we bought them. For example, I buy one jar of salsa every time I'm at the store & I use the expiration dates to make sure the oldest gets eaten first, and so on. That way, I don't eat a month-old jar before I eat the 6 months old jar. Ta daaaaa

Side note: I hate that subby's headline joke makes me laugh every time. Dammit.
 
2014-03-30 04:57:12 PM  
 
2014-03-30 05:34:19 PM  
www.primermagazine.com
 
2014-03-30 05:36:30 PM  

fusillade762: [www.primermagazine.com image 530x260]


Because it slowly leaches chemicals from the plastic over time?
 
2014-03-30 05:38:29 PM  

optikeye: fusillade762: [www.primermagazine.com image 530x260]

Because it slowly leaches chemicals from the plastic over time?


In  a similar story, I had some vodka in a plastic flask I had use to take to a party and forgot about it in the cabinate for a couple of year. Whooooo...that stuff tasted rank like a brand new shower curtain taste.
 
2014-03-30 05:47:27 PM  

optikeye: optikeye: fusillade762: [www.primermagazine.com image 530x260]

Because it slowly leaches chemicals from the plastic over time?

In  a similar story, I had some vodka in a plastic flask I had use to take to a party and forgot about it in the cabinate for a couple of year. Whooooo...that stuff tasted rank like a brand new shower curtain taste.


A: That's what you get for drinking vodak.

B: That's still what you get for drinking vodak.

C: Plastic is the worst discovery ever and should be illegal in food production.
 
2014-03-30 05:54:26 PM  

Di Atribe: As someone who, just this week, food-poisoned herself after eating some spring mix all of one day after the expiration date, may I just say that I respect expiration dates very much. They also help us to use our products in the order in which we bought them. For example, I buy one jar of salsa every time I'm at the store & I use the expiration dates to make sure the oldest gets eaten first, and so on. That way, I don't eat a month-old jar before I eat the 6 months old jar. Ta daaaaa

Side note: I hate that subby's headline joke makes me laugh every time. Dammit.


Food doesn't need an arbitrary best before or use before date.   That is meaningless anyways, because there are a whole host of factors, like temperature, humidity and what other foods it's stored near, that will have an impact on how quickly something turns.

It only needs a production date on it, which would give you precisely the information you need to triage your salsa.  BTW- I doubt that your spring mix had an expiration date- more likely a best before date.  It's leaves, FFS. Even as a green pulpy mass in the bag doesn't render it inedible (from a health perspective, anyways).

It didn't turn inedible in 24 hours, and besides any dates on the package are incredibly conservative because of the factors that I mentioned.  Considering that that spring mix could have been grown in Mexico with human fecal matter as fertilizer, it's more likely is that it needed one more wash before use, as should be de rigeur with any 'pre washed' produce.   Consider yourself lucky- It could have been much more serious than 24 hours on the toilet.
 
2014-03-30 06:10:00 PM  

unyon: It only needs a production date on it, which would give you precisely the information you need to triage your salsa. BTW- I doubt that your spring mix had an expiration date- more likely a best before date. It's leaves, FFS. Even as a green pulpy mass in the bag doesn't render it inedible (from a health perspective, anyways).


First of all, I'd like to say that it was indeed inedible. Not in the way that it's IMPOSSIBLE to eat, like gravel or Little Caesar's. I mean that for the next 24 hours, my body actively rejected it. Yes, it's "just leaves," but the leaves aren't the problem. It's the bacteria growing on them. I agree that a production date would be helpful, but a "best by" date is MORE helpful to average humans like myself who don't know how long it takes for every type of food to go bad. Most stuff, you can tell, but not all. And with that wretched memory still fresh on my mind, I will happily consider all expiration dates for some time.

Do they really use people poop in Mexico? Why does that gross me out more than when they use cow poop? It's not like using cow shiat makes my vegetables taste more like steak. Ooooh steakomatoes.

BTW, stealing "triage my salsa" for future use. Thank you.

Also, not sure if you're aware, but you're featured in my profile for some funny shiat you said a long time ago. Just thought you should know. :)
 
2014-03-30 06:12:27 PM  

optikeye: In  a similar story, I had some vodka in a plastic flask I had use to take to a party and forgot about it in the cabinate for a couple of year. Whooooo...that stuff tasted rank like a brand new shower curtain taste.


The important question is did you still drink it?
 
2014-03-30 06:26:12 PM  

Radak: optikeye: In  a similar story, I had some vodka in a plastic flask I had use to take to a party and forgot about it in the cabinate for a couple of year. Whooooo...that stuff tasted rank like a brand new shower curtain taste.

The important question is did you still drink it?


No, I found a bottle of Listerine instead.
 
2014-03-30 06:39:34 PM  

optikeye: fusillade762: [www.primermagazine.com image 530x260]

Because it slowly leaches chemicals from the plastic over time?


Yup. I'm up to a C-cup now.

Just kidding. I'm a nice, svelte, B.
 
2014-03-30 07:01:38 PM  
In this age of packaged everything a use by/best by date is incredibly important.  Like was posted earlier, it helps in rotation.  But at the same time, it helps in the initial purchase.  Go to buy milk, and which would you rather buy?  The carton with the best by date of tomorrow, or the one that is dated next week or the week after?  Sure there is no guarantee that the one with the longest date is best, but it has a higher probability of being better.

It also helps with issues when you by items that are bad.  Items that you can't see as bad through the packaging.  Wilted lettuce may show as bad, but if it still looks good?  Two days ago my wife bought a ham at the grocery store.  It had a best by date of April 8.  She opened it up last night and it was spoiled.  We didn't go ahead and eat it because well, the smell test kicked in, but at this point, we can take it back to the store and get a refund.
 
2014-03-30 08:05:22 PM  
I'm sure it probably also has to do with money.  People will be willing to throw out a usable product and buy replacements because they think it's expired.
 
2014-03-30 08:08:42 PM  

doglover: optikeye: optikeye: fusillade762: [www.primermagazine.com image 530x260]

Because it slowly leaches chemicals from the plastic over time?

In  a similar story, I had some vodka in a plastic flask I had use to take to a party and forgot about it in the cabinate for a couple of year. Whooooo...that stuff tasted rank like a brand new shower curtain taste.

A: That's what you get for drinking vodak.

B: That's still what you get for drinking vodak.


C: Plastic is the worst discovery ever and should be illegal in food production.


cdn.uproxx.com
 
2014-03-30 08:13:34 PM  

optikeye: optikeye: fusillade762: [www.primermagazine.com image 530x260]

Because it slowly leaches chemicals from the plastic over time?

In  a similar story, I had some vodka in a plastic flask I had use to take to a party and forgot about it in the cabinate for a couple of year. Whooooo...that stuff tasted rank like a brand new shower curtain taste.


But you still drank it, right?
 
2014-03-30 08:18:33 PM  

optikeye: Radak: optikeye: In  a similar story, I had some vodka in a plastic flask I had use to take to a party and forgot about it in the cabinate for a couple of year. Whooooo...that stuff tasted rank like a brand new shower curtain taste.

The important question is did you still drink it?

No, I found a bottle of Listerine instead.


I actually drank mouthwash by accident once. Told a friend to put a water bottle with vodka in it in his car. When we got in the car I saw a bottle of the same brand between the seats and assumed it was mine. It was not. Still not sure why he had a bottle of mouthwash in his car. On the plus side I had minty-fresh breath for the rest of the evening.
 
NFA
2014-03-30 08:44:02 PM  

fusillade762: [www.primermagazine.com image 530x260]


img.fark.net


The correct answer (from the water bottling industry) is that water does not expire.  However, federal law requires that all products sold for human consumption have an expiration date so they arbitrarily put an expiration date on the bottle.
 
2014-03-30 08:48:17 PM  

BizarreMan: In this age of packaged everything a use by/best by date is incredibly important.  Like was posted earlier, it helps in rotation.  But at the same time, it helps in the initial purchase.  Go to buy milk, and which would you rather buy?  The carton with the best by date of tomorrow, or the one that is dated next week or the week after?  Sure there is no guarantee that the one with the longest date is best, but it has a higher probability of being better.

It also helps with issues when you by items that are bad.  Items that you can't see as bad through the packaging.  Wilted lettuce may show as bad, but if it still looks good?  Two days ago my wife bought a ham at the grocery store.  It had a best by date of April 8.  She opened it up last night and it was spoiled.  We didn't go ahead and eat it because well, the smell test kicked in, but at this point, we can take it back to the store and get a refund.


Unless it sat out of the fridge for a long time on the ride home or something, a very likely explanation for this is unscrupulous relabeling of expiration dates by the grocer. Just fyi
 
2014-03-30 08:50:32 PM  
Coke Zero is nasty a week before the expiration date. I don't buy it at the corner store if it's within a month.

I had a nasty experience with a box of mac-n-cheese. Tasted like the cardboard box, at least two years past the best before.

It's nice to get a date on stuff.
 
2014-03-30 08:52:30 PM  
For the same reason that the inflatable beach ball I purchased for my niece when she was little had safety warning on it in 14 different languages on a sticker that ran down the entire height of the ball. A BEACH BALL.

Lawyers.
 
2014-03-30 08:57:42 PM  

wildcardjack: Coke Zero is nasty a week before the expiration date. I don't buy it at the corner store if it's within a month.

I had a nasty experience with a box of mac-n-cheese. Tasted like the cardboard box, at least two years past the best before.

It's nice to get a date on stuff.


Artificial sweetners do not age well at all.  I was working in an office and the manager found a case of Diet soda that was like 3 years old.  I took one sip and spit it out. It was most foul.
 
2014-03-30 08:59:44 PM  

rewind2846: For the same reason that the inflatable beach ball I purchased for my niece when she was little had safety warning on it in 14 different languages on a sticker that ran down the entire height of the ball. A BEACH BALL.

Lawyers.


I'm appalled at your lack of empathy. I tried to eat a beach ball once because it looked colorful and delicious, and I died. It was the worst experience of my life, and it was all because the beach ball manufacturers couldn't be bothered to put the warning in the one language I'm fluent in, esperanto.
 
2014-03-30 09:20:27 PM  

NFA: federal law requires that all products sold for human consumption have an expiration date


TFA: "In the United States, federal law requires only that infant formula be dated "
 
2014-03-30 09:46:06 PM  

jaytkay: NFA: federal law requires that all products sold for human consumption have an expiration date

TFA: "In the United States, federal law requires only that infant formula be dated "


I do believe New Jersey is a state that requires an expiration date... even on water... no later than 3 years after the item is made. The short answer is that companies are too lazy to bother with new packaging to conform with specific states, and the issues involved in the logistics, so... everything gets stamped.

Here in Michigan, I believe there is no state law requiring expiration dates, so there is a small market for "expired items" at some stores. I love seeing the "outdated but still good!" signs written up under a crazy cheap price for something. Some stuff, like those Lofthouse cookies, get stored in freezers and brought back out 4 months past their season (Think: Valentine cookies in October) and sold for $0.50 per box, tasting as fresh as they did in February when they didn't sell for $2.98 at some other store.
 
2014-03-30 09:54:18 PM  

NFA: fusillade762: [www.primermagazine.com image 530x260]

[img.fark.net image 530x260]


The correct answer (from the water bottling industry) is that water does not expire.  However, federal law requires that all products sold for human consumption have an expiration date so they arbitrarily put an expiration date on the bottle.


Ever taste water that had been left in the sun (in the desert) in plastic containers over a year or more?  Not very tasty.  It's probably the reason why I refuse to drink bottled water over tap due to too many exposures to bottled water in hot environments.  Funny that I'm the guy that tests water and no primary standards were/are violated in those bottled waters, but I cannot find bottled water to be palatable (secondary standard).
 
2014-03-30 10:44:18 PM  
Expiration dates are relative in my house; your nose is a pretty good guide. Plus, I got dysentery from a restaurant. Unless you grew that stuff yourself, you really don't know what's on or in it.

However, I refuse to buy chocolate ice cream after reading that article about how companies can and do "reprocess" expired food. Basically, chocolate is the borg of ice cream; everything else gets turned into it. . . blegh!
 
2014-03-30 11:20:56 PM  
Turnover (more purchases and a guarantee that the consumer doesn't have a less than optimal experience). Those drive the dates
 
2014-03-30 11:21:19 PM  

Di Atribe: As someone who, just this week, food-poisoned herself after eating some spring mix all of one day after the expiration date, may I just say that I respect expiration dates very much. They also help us to use our products in the order in which we bought them. For example, I buy one jar of salsa every time I'm at the store & I use the expiration dates to make sure the oldest gets eaten first, and so on. That way, I don't eat a month-old jar before I eat the 6 months old jar. Ta daaaaa


Actually that is because the illegal alien hired by  the Conservative farmer to harvest it pooped on it!

/Grew up in the  "lettuce Capital of the world Yuma AZ and lived in CAs Central Valley
 
2014-03-30 11:24:56 PM  

ramblinwreck: Ever taste water that had been left in the sun (in the desert) in plastic containers over a year or more?  Not very tasty.  It's probably the reason why I refuse to drink bottled water over tap due to too many exposures to bottled water in hot environments.  Funny that I'm the guy that tests water and no primary standards were/are violated in those bottled waters, but I cannot find bottled water to be palatable (secondary standard).


I remember reading an article about low tech innovations in some third world African country where they take bottles of water and lay them over corrugated metal to sit in the hot sun to kill off any harmful bacteria.

I thought that was pretty clever. Never thought about how water heated in plastic bottles would taste though.
 
2014-03-30 11:55:31 PM  

wildcardjack: I had a nasty experience with a box of mac-n-cheese. Tasted like the cardboard box, at least two years past the best before.


I think that has less to do with the expiration date and more to do with the fact that it's mac-n-cheese from a cardboard box. That stuff sucks ass.

Here's a simple mac-n-cheese recipe that neither costs a lot nor sucks ass:


One 16oz box of elbow macaroni (or seashells, or rotini, or nearly any kind of pasta except spaghetti or lasagna)
One 12oz bag of shredded cheddar cheese (real cheese, not imitation cheese -- check the label before you buy)
4 oz of whole milk (optional)

Cook the pasta as you normally would, but use a bit less water in the pot at the start. The water will reach the "okay, pasta's done, time to drain the water" level a bit before the pasta's done, but keep cooking and keep stirring until the pasta actually is done and there's a little bit of water left. DO NOT DRAIN THE WATER.

Add the cheese (and milk, if desired) and stir.


Good for a decent-sized family dinner, depending on how many people are eating and the size of their appetites. Be prepared to put away leftovers, which should be eaten within 3 days.


/substitute cheddar cheese and whole milk with non-lactose cheese and soy milk if serving lactose intolerant persons or vegans/non-dairy vegetarians
 
2014-03-31 12:00:00 AM  

Azlefty: Di Atribe: As someone who, just this week, food-poisoned herself after eating some spring mix all of one day after the expiration date, may I just say that I respect expiration dates very much. They also help us to use our products in the order in which we bought them. For example, I buy one jar of salsa every time I'm at the store & I use the expiration dates to make sure the oldest gets eaten first, and so on. That way, I don't eat a month-old jar before I eat the 6 months old jar. Ta daaaaa

Actually that is because the illegal alien hired by  the Conservative farmer to harvest it pooped on it!

/Grew up in the  "lettuce Capital of the world Yuma AZ and lived in CAs Central Valley


Hm, definitely out on salads for a while. *hork*
 
2014-03-31 12:26:30 AM  

wildcardjack: Coke Zero is nasty a week before the expiration date. I don't buy it at the corner store if it's within a month.

I had a nasty experience with a box of mac-n-cheese. Tasted like the cardboard box, at least two years past the best before.

It's nice to get a date on stuff.


Cans are good though.  I ate some tuna that was dated "use by" or "best by" 2008 not long ago.  It was fine.
 
2014-03-31 12:38:02 AM  
Di Atribe:

First of all, I'd like to say that it was indeed inedible. Not in the way that it's IMPOSSIBLE to eat, like gravel or Little Caesar's.

Ok, I'm totally stealing that.

I agree that a production date would be helpful, but a "best by" date is MORE helpful to average humans like myself who don't know how long it takes for every type of food to go bad. Most stuff, you can tell, but not all. And with that wretched memory still fresh on my mind, I will happily consider all expiration dates for some time.

Seems reasonable.

Do they really use people poop in Mexico? Why does that gross me out more than when they use cow poop? It's not like using cow shiat makes my vegetables taste more like steak. Ooooh steakomatoes.

Green onion from Mexico was the culprit in the 2003 Chi-Chi's contamination that poisoned more than 500 and killed three.  Although it's not using untreated human poop for fertilizer that's the problem, it's not washing the produce thoroughly before consuming that is.  I live part of the year in Mexico and have never got sick from local produce, but we're incredibly thorough with washing. 

BTW, stealing "triage my salsa" for future use. Thank you.

Consider it a trade for gravel and little caesar's.

*internet fistbump*

Also, not sure if you're aware, but you're featured in my profile for some funny shiat you said a long time ago. Just thought you should know. :)

Awesome!  I actually harboured a secret wish to have something here show up in someone's profile.

*checks bucket list, crosses off item #332*

/It's really kind of pathetic
 
2014-03-31 12:39:32 AM  
The biggest change I've seen over the years is with bread.

It used to go bad and get rotated out and moved to the day old bread section. Now it seems to have the shelf life of a twinkee.

Well except for some Famous Loaf bread I found that actually goes bad and molds normally after a week. I'm guessing it digest better.

Watching bread dates seems mandatory now.
 
2014-03-31 12:42:58 AM  

Azlefty: Di Atribe: As someone who, just this week, food-poisoned herself after eating some spring mix all of one day after the expiration date, may I just say that I respect expiration dates very much. They also help us to use our products in the order in which we bought them. For example, I buy one jar of salsa every time I'm at the store & I use the expiration dates to make sure the oldest gets eaten first, and so on. That way, I don't eat a month-old jar before I eat the 6 months old jar. Ta daaaaa

Actually that is because the illegal alien hired by  the Conservative farmer to harvest it pooped on it!

/Grew up in the  "lettuce Capital of the world Yuma AZ and lived in CAs Central Valley


I was just hearing as a result of people getting sick the farmers can no longer use fertilizer from animals. They were saying that organic compost from plants material was being used now.
 
2014-03-31 12:43:39 AM  

StokeyBob: The biggest change I've seen over the years is with bread.

It used to go bad and get rotated out and moved to the day old bread section. Now it seems to have the shelf life of a twinkee.

Well except for some Famous Loaf bread I found that actually goes bad and molds normally after a week. I'm guessing it digest better.

Watching bread dates seems mandatory now.


I noticed bread and cheese last a LOT longer than they used to when I was a kid.  I found an unopened bag of shredded cheese that I bought a couple months ago, and not the slightest discoloration.  Granted it was unopened but still, no mold at all.
 
2014-03-31 12:52:02 AM  
The only one I tend to follow is the one for milk. That one has almost always been spot on. Everything else is just a suggestion to get it eaten a month or three after the date if it is unopened.
 
2014-03-31 01:40:08 AM  

Ambivalence: StokeyBob: The biggest change I've seen over the years is with bread.

It used to go bad and get rotated out and moved to the day old bread section. Now it seems to have the shelf life of a twinkee.

Well except for some Famous Loaf bread I found that actually goes bad and molds normally after a week. I'm guessing it digest better.

Watching bread dates seems mandatory now.

I noticed bread and cheese last a LOT longer than they used to when I was a kid.  I found an unopened bag of shredded cheese that I bought a couple months ago, and not the slightest discoloration.  Granted it was unopened but still, no mold at all.




Cheese products are often packed with gasses other than air to prolong shelf life. Modified Atmosphere Packaging. Kinda cool since it doesn't add anything to the cheese itself.
 
2014-03-31 01:41:43 AM  
Sorry, link didn't work properly

Modified Atmosphere Packaging
 
2014-03-31 01:41:54 AM  

rewind2846: For the same reason that the inflatable beach ball I purchased for my niece when she was little had safety warning on it in 14 different languages on a sticker that ran down the entire height of the ball. A BEACH BALL.

Lawyers.


Lawyers only sue when people hire them. It's like blaming the gun instead of the shooter.
 
2014-03-31 01:56:03 AM  
Expiration dates are made up eh?  I guess we can shut down those stability chambers in the lab at work then...
 
2014-03-31 02:11:53 AM  

ZAZ: According to the article, lawyers had little to do with it. Customers feel better if there is a date on the food to reassure them.


This!

I recall some cheapo mom-n-pop grocery store that used to be in my neighborhood since the 30's till they closed back in '99. They had a box of Wheat Thins on the shelf on sale for so long that the box printing was literally fading away from the cardboard. Worse than stale!
 
2014-03-31 02:26:04 AM  
Eh, the Von's by my apartment ignores them anyway. Bought a pork loin and noticed that the "sell by" date was 3 months ago. Also, there were some moldy portabellas on the shelves recently. I'm nearly to the point I don't trust anything that's not dry or canned from Von's.
 
2014-03-31 02:46:37 AM  

wildcardjack: Coke Zero is nasty a week before the expiration date. I don't buy it at the corner store if it's within a month.

I had a nasty experience with a box of mac-n-cheese. Tasted like the cardboard box, at least two years past the best before.

It's nice to get a date on stuff.


A date you appzrently promptly ignore.
 
2014-03-31 02:52:49 AM  

Di Atribe: Azlefty: Di Atribe: As someone who, just this week, food-poisoned herself after eating some spring mix all of one day after the expiration date, may I just say that I respect expiration dates very much. They also help us to use our products in the order in which we bought them. For example, I buy one jar of salsa every time I'm at the store & I use the expiration dates to make sure the oldest gets eaten first, and so on. That way, I don't eat a month-old jar before I eat the 6 months old jar. Ta daaaaa

Actually that is because the illegal alien hired by  the Conservative farmer to harvest it pooped on it!

/Grew up in the  "lettuce Capital of the world Yuma AZ and lived in CAs Central Valley

Hm, definitely out on salads for a while. *hork*


Were you under the impression that the well-paid American citizens who harvest your vegetables retreated to their conveniently located, air-conditioned executive washrooms on their lengthy breaks and promptly washed their hands when finished?
 
2014-03-31 03:15:32 AM  

flemardo: The only one I tend to follow is the one for milk. That one has almost always been spot on. Everything else is just a suggestion to get it eaten a month or three after the date if it is unopened.


I've had milk stay good for like two weeks after the date. Then again I've had it (and half and half) go funky within a few days of it.

Use the smell test when in doubt, also, chunks are generally a bad sign. (That's when you cook with it).

I'm convinced it's all about how long it stays on a pallet at the store. I had nearly a half gallon of half and half that ended up as Alfredo sauce three days after I bought it, because otherwise it would have gone to waste as it was [ ] close to curdling. *shakes tiny fist at loading dock workers*
 
2014-03-31 04:22:04 AM  
The food may still be safe to eat, but the quality of the product taste and texture may alter which customers do not like. Canned foods taste canny, Cheerios are not so cheery, and personal lubricants aren't so personable.
 
2014-03-31 04:26:01 AM  

discount sushi: Sorry, link didn't work properly

Modified Atmosphere Packaging


Or in the EU it can marked up as E941 (which is basically Nitrogen gas, or air with the Oxygen and CO2 removed more or less). It is a really easy and cheap way to stop most biological activity.
 
2014-03-31 05:13:25 AM  

King Something: wildcardjack: I had a nasty experience with a box of mac-n-cheese. Tasted like the cardboard box, at least two years past the best before.

I think that has less to do with the expiration date and more to do with the fact that it's mac-n-cheese from a cardboard box. That stuff sucks ass.

Here's a simple mac-n-cheese recipe that neither costs a lot nor sucks ass:


One 16oz box of elbow macaroni (or seashells, or rotini, or nearly any kind of pasta except spaghetti or lasagna)
One 12oz bag of shredded cheddar cheese (real cheese, not imitation cheese -- check the label before you buy)
4 oz of whole milk (optional)

Cook the pasta as you normally would, but use a bit less water in the pot at the start. The water will reach the "okay, pasta's done, time to drain the water" level a bit before the pasta's done, but keep cooking and keep stirring until the pasta actually is done and there's a little bit of water left. DO NOT DRAIN THE WATER.

Add the cheese (and milk, if desired) and stir.


Good for a decent-sized family dinner, depending on how many people are eating and the size of their appetites. Be prepared to put away leftovers, which should be eaten within 3 days.


/substitute cheddar cheese and whole milk with non-lactose cheese and soy milk if serving lactose intolerant persons or vegans/non-dairy vegetarians


There is a lot wrong with your recipe. As such, I do not know where to start.

Just wow.
 
Displayed 50 of 88 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report