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(Denver Channel)   Locked your keys in your car and don't want to wait hours and pay one of those greedy tow truck drivers to come out and pop your car door open? Why not call 911 and tell them you've locked your baby in the car? I'm sure they'll be happy to help you   ( thedenverchannel.com) divider line
    More: Dumbass, bus drivers  
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3807 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Mar 2014 at 12:03 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-30 11:25:41 AM  
I understand why people don't want to pay $80-$200 for a duplicate key these days, but...

A door-only key well hidden outside the car or at least saved at home (so a friend can bring it to you) is a cheap, easy way to prevent this nonsense.
 
2014-03-30 11:38:11 AM  

SecretAgentWoman: I understand why people don't want to pay $80-$200 for a duplicate key these days, but...

A door-only key well hidden outside the car or at least saved at home (so a friend can bring it to you) is a cheap, easy way to prevent this nonsense.


Depending on the car, a door-only key can be made for as little as 3 bucks. It only gets expensive with newer cars when you have to have the damn security chips programmed to start the ignition.
 
2014-03-30 12:06:49 PM  
Well, it worked.
 
2014-03-30 12:12:43 PM  
You can actually just ask a cop and either they'll help or get someone who will.

/spare key in magnet thing under truck
 
2014-03-30 12:13:43 PM  
A couple of years ago I locked my keys in my car at the gas station. When I went inside the store to admit my dumbassery and ask if they had a coat hanger or something I could use they said call 911 and the cops would come and unlock my car for me. So, I did, and they did, and it was free... I even offered to pay a stupid tax for the work, but the community service officer they sent just chuckled a bit and left.

So, yes, depending on where you are, calling 911 may be the solution and no lies are required. BTW, this was in Brooklyn Park, MN.
 
2014-03-30 12:15:06 PM  
"It ties up our officers," said Lopez. "Guess what happens.....

Stymies the War On Drugs?
Homeless people have to beat themselves bloody?
Guys have to shoot themselves for Driving While Black?
Police payoffs deliver themselves?

C'mon, help me out here, it's like a mystery.
 
2014-03-30 12:16:14 PM  
Most of the police I've known say they only have one way to open your locked car...Smashing the side window in with a truncheon.  I'd rather drop $30-$80 on a locksmith than $200-$300 on a new side window.

/one did offer to open my drunk friend's trunk for him by shooting holes through it around the lock.
//drunk friend was underwhelmed.
 
2014-03-30 12:17:22 PM  

muchgoodmojo: A couple of years ago I locked my keys in my car at the gas station. When I went inside the store to admit my dumbassery and ask if they had a coat hanger or something I could use they said call 911 and the cops would come and unlock my car for me. So, I did, and they did, and it was free... I even offered to pay a stupid tax for the work, but the community service officer they sent just chuckled a bit and left.

So, yes, depending on where you are, calling 911 may be the solution and no lies are required. BTW, this was in Brooklyn Park, MN.


Typically calling the non-emergency line is preferred, but yes cops will help you get in your car. Though most Farkers are petrified of cops, so it may not be helpful.
 
2014-03-30 12:20:22 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: SecretAgentWoman: I understand why people don't want to pay $80-$200 for a duplicate key these days, but...

A door-only key well hidden outside the car or at least saved at home (so a friend can bring it to you) is a cheap, easy way to prevent this nonsense.

Depending on the car, a door-only key can be made for as little as 3 bucks. It only gets expensive with newer cars when you have to have the damn security chips programmed to start the ignition.


There's a way around that. The distance that the ignition will detect the chip is surprisingly far. Get a few cheap spare keys cut, and hide one of the chipped keys inside the car. Maybe remove part of the dash and tape it to the inside. If you're worried about leaving a key on the inside of the car, you could cut the blade off the key and only have the part with the chip in the car. A hardware store key should start the car. If you have it, the valet key that comes with many vehicles would be ideal for that use.
 
2014-03-30 12:21:10 PM  
I added the roadside/towing coverage to my auto policy a couple of years ago, just because it really didn't add much to the premium and would more than pay for itself in one tow or lockout. Glad I did, because Mrs Buzzcut has locked the keys in the car a couple of times and it needed towed once when it would not go into gear at all.
 
2014-03-30 12:21:49 PM  
Just a nitpick, but would the subby please link to the non-mobile version of the site he/she submitted?
 
2014-03-30 12:22:25 PM  
My FD will also open locked running cars, probably any car if you ring the bell at the station.
 
2014-03-30 12:22:32 PM  
CAA/AAA will show up faster if you say you have a child or pet in the vehicle. As it is a paid service, it should be first come, first served so long as it isn't an emergency medical situation but then I suppose those people should call 911 instead of CAA/AAA.
 
2014-03-30 12:23:53 PM  

muchgoodmojo: A couple of years ago I locked my keys in my car at the gas station. When I went inside the store to admit my dumbassery and ask if they had a coat hanger or something I could use they said call 911 and the cops would come and unlock my car for me. So, I did, and they did, and it was free... I even offered to pay a stupid tax for the work, but the community service officer they sent just chuckled a bit and left.

So, yes, depending on where you are, calling 911 may be the solution and no lies are required. BTW, this was in Brooklyn Park, MN.


The Police don't have anything better to do there, now that Century Courts is gone.
 
2014-03-30 12:36:55 PM  

lizyrd: FirstNationalBastard: SecretAgentWoman: I understand why people don't want to pay $80-$200 for a duplicate key these days, but...

A door-only key well hidden outside the car or at least saved at home (so a friend can bring it to you) is a cheap, easy way to prevent this nonsense.

Depending on the car, a door-only key can be made for as little as 3 bucks. It only gets expensive with newer cars when you have to have the damn security chips programmed to start the ignition.

There's a way around that. The distance that the ignition will detect the chip is surprisingly far. Get a few cheap spare keys cut, and hide one of the chipped keys inside the car. Maybe remove part of the dash and tape it to the inside. If you're worried about leaving a key on the inside of the car, you could cut the blade off the key and only have the part with the chip in the car. A hardware store key should start the car. If you have it, the valet key that comes with many vehicles would be ideal for that use.


In most cases, an RFID valet key can be made for around 30 bucks. It's fully functional, but without the built-in remote functions most keys have now.

Programming is simple and very similar on almost all makes of vehicles if you already have two functioning keys already. After having a compatible RFID key key, it's usually like this: Put one key in and turn it on. Let the ECM power up and self-test. Quickly remove the key and put the second one in, turning it to the 'on' position. Power up self-test again, but some dash light will blink or a chime will sound indicating programming mode. Some vehicles will lock and unlock the doors to indicate this. Now put the new key in and turn it to 'on.' More lights blink or more chimes sound. Programming complete. The last valet key I had made for my Accord was something like 35 bucks because I bought the key and paid for the cutting all from the smith. The OE key with all the gadgets on it was nearly 300 bucks, which was stupid to pay when just wanting a spare for just in case. It also functions as that second key if I lose one of my remote keys for programming purposes.

If you only have one key though... that is usually a trip to the dealer.
 
2014-03-30 12:37:06 PM  

SecretAgentWoman: I understand why people don't want to pay $80-$200 for a duplicate key these days, but...

A door-only key well hidden outside the car or at least saved at home (so a friend can bring it to you) is a cheap, easy way to prevent this nonsense.


Many chip key copies will not start your vehicle but they will open doors and trunks. I wonder if in this case if law enforcement is required to open up the vehicle seeing that it was an invented reason to get in it. I bet that fine is 4x the tow company fee.
 
2014-03-30 12:38:48 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: SecretAgentWoman: I understand why people don't want to pay $80-$200 for a duplicate key these days, but...

A door-only key well hidden outside the car or at least saved at home (so a friend can bring it to you) is a cheap, easy way to prevent this nonsense.

Depending on the car, a door-only key can be made for as little as 3 bucks. It only gets expensive with newer cars when you have to have the damn security chips programmed to start the ignition.


A door-only key wouldn't be used in the ignition.
 
2014-03-30 12:52:53 PM  

muchgoodmojo: A couple of years ago I locked my keys in my car at the gas station. When I went inside the store to admit my dumbassery and ask if they had a coat hanger or something I could use they said call 911 and the cops would come and unlock my car for me. So, I did, and they did, and it was free... I even offered to pay a stupid tax for the work, but the community service officer they sent just chuckled a bit and left.

So, yes, depending on where you are, calling 911 may be the solution and no lies are required. BTW, this was in Brooklyn Park, MN.


Yeah, we'd prefer it if you called the non emergency number for that unless there really was a baby or pet in there, but either way we'll send someone to open your door. And it doesn't involve breaking windows or shooting locks either.
 
2014-03-30 12:53:27 PM  
Some police departments and fire departments carry a slim-jim or door hook they can use to unlock car doors.

Calling 911 for this, however, MIGHT get you these instead.

www.fireengineering.com
 
2014-03-30 12:54:34 PM  
work for the Atlanta Fire Department. If a child is locked in a car here, we would be dispatched, not the PD. Most people here just lie to me when I confront them about no child being in the car and say "I didn't say that".

On the plus side, if you flag us down or knock on the station door, we are happy to unlock your door for you.
 
2014-03-30 12:57:43 PM  
I'd think that a AAA membership would be a little cheaper than a fine or something.

And if you don't have it...back in August 2001 my husband and I were in Niagara Falls and he lost his keys.  I didn't have a copy of his car key on my keyring (yeah, bad move).  We called the local Ford dealership and so long as he had his ID they'd make him a new key for a few bucks.  So we took a cab over there and got the key made.  He had a 1998 Ford Escort ZX2.

Before that we were walking along looking for them and here I was 5 months pregnant with our son.  Not fun.

At least we live in Ohio, so anyone who found them wouldn't have been able to do any damage.
 
2014-03-30 01:00:41 PM  

Miss Alexandra: I'd think that a AAA membership would be a little cheaper than a fine or something.


The departments who will do it don't fine you or involve the police if you don't call 911 and lie about an emergency to get them out there. Call the fire station directly, and they'll tell you if they can do it or not. Or the city non-emergency line.
 
2014-03-30 01:03:11 PM  

hardinparamedic: Miss Alexandra: I'd think that a AAA membership would be a little cheaper than a fine or something.

The departments who will do it don't fine you or involve the police if you don't call 911 and lie about an emergency to get them out there. Call the fire station directly, and they'll tell you if they can do it or not. Or the city non-emergency line.


Hm.  Didn't know that.

I do know that if you have a tow truck come out, it's about $25, ballpark figure.

/has AAA Plus
 
2014-03-30 01:03:28 PM  

lizyrd: FirstNationalBastard: SecretAgentWoman: I understand why people don't want to pay $80-$200 for a duplicate key these days, but...

A door-only key well hidden outside the car or at least saved at home (so a friend can bring it to you) is a cheap, easy way to prevent this nonsense.

Depending on the car, a door-only key can be made for as little as 3 bucks. It only gets expensive with newer cars when you have to have the damn security chips programmed to start the ignition.

There's a way around that. The distance that the ignition will detect the chip is surprisingly far. Get a few cheap spare keys cut, and hide one of the chipped keys inside the car. Maybe remove part of the dash and tape it to the inside. If you're worried about leaving a key on the inside of the car, you could cut the blade off the key and only have the part with the chip in the car. A hardware store key should start the car. If you have it, the valet key that comes with many vehicles would be ideal for that use.


You just disabled all the security features, and now they're useless, I don't want someone to be able to start it with the valet key..
 
2014-03-30 01:05:28 PM  

karst: Most of the police I've known say they only have one way to open your locked car...Smashing the side window in with a truncheon.  I'd rather drop $30-$80 on a locksmith than $200-$300 on a new side window.

/one did offer to open my drunk friend's trunk for him by shooting holes through it around the lock.
//drunk friend was underwhelmed.


On base, the MP had an inflatable baggie like a blood pressure cuff. It was awesome.

Slightly opened the door and made space for a wand to unlock the door.
 
2014-03-30 01:06:18 PM  

muchgoodmojo: A couple of years ago I locked my keys in my car at the gas station. When I went inside the store to admit my dumbassery and ask if they had a coat hanger or something I could use they said call 911 and the cops would come and unlock my car for me. So, I did, and they did, and it was free... I even offered to pay a stupid tax for the work, but the community service officer they sent just chuckled a bit and left.

So, yes, depending on where you are, calling 911 may be the solution and no lies are required. BTW, this was in Brooklyn Park, MN.


My dog once locked me out of my still-running car when delivering papers. Fortunately I had my bluetooth headset in (no phone), so I had a friend call the non-emergency number. The cop came out and managed to get my door open, no issues. Even hugged the guy, because I was running late because of the stupidity involved... this was in Painesville, Ohio, though, so YMMV...
 
2014-03-30 01:06:27 PM  

lizyrd: FirstNationalBastard: SecretAgentWoman: I understand why people don't want to pay $80-$200 for a duplicate key these days, but...

A door-only key well hidden outside the car or at least saved at home (so a friend can bring it to you) is a cheap, easy way to prevent this nonsense.

Depending on the car, a door-only key can be made for as little as 3 bucks. It only gets expensive with newer cars when you have to have the damn security chips programmed to start the ignition.

There's a way around that. The distance that the ignition will detect the chip is surprisingly far. Get a few cheap spare keys cut, and hide one of the chipped keys inside the car. Maybe remove part of the dash and tape it to the inside. If you're worried about leaving a key on the inside of the car, you could cut the blade off the key and only have the part with the chip in the car. A hardware store key should start the car. If you have it, the valet key that comes with many vehicles would be ideal for that use.


---
good idea, thanks
 
2014-03-30 01:13:35 PM  
An ambulance/fire truck coming out will cost you upwards of 2k$ sometimes if it's not an actual emergency and several hundred even if it  is an emergency sometimes, so I'm not sure the cunning plan was thought all the way through here.
 
2014-03-30 01:15:41 PM  

Jim_Callahan: An ambulance/fire truck coming out will cost you upwards of 2k$ sometimes if it's not an actual emergency and several hundred even if it  is an emergency sometimes, so I'm not sure the cunning plan was thought all the way through here.


Not true at all. What are you going to bill for? No fire or car accident - meaning no insurance billing of a fire fee, and no medical problem - meaning no way to bill unless the department has a serial abuser policy.
 
2014-03-30 01:37:50 PM  

CruJones: lizyrd: FirstNationalBastard: SecretAgentWoman: I understand why people don't want to pay $80-$200 for a duplicate key these days, but...

A door-only key well hidden outside the car or at least saved at home (so a friend can bring it to you) is a cheap, easy way to prevent this nonsense.

Depending on the car, a door-only key can be made for as little as 3 bucks. It only gets expensive with newer cars when you have to have the damn security chips programmed to start the ignition.

There's a way around that. The distance that the ignition will detect the chip is surprisingly far. Get a few cheap spare keys cut, and hide one of the chipped keys inside the car. Maybe remove part of the dash and tape it to the inside. If you're worried about leaving a key on the inside of the car, you could cut the blade off the key and only have the part with the chip in the car. A hardware store key should start the car. If you have it, the valet key that comes with many vehicles would be ideal for that use.

You just disabled all the security features, and now they're useless, I don't want someone to be able to start it with the valet key..


The valet key does start the car. How else would a valet use it to park your car? It just doesn't unlock the glove box. I was only describing a way to use a $3 hardware store key instead of buying chipped keys at the dealership. An example would be a company vehicle that 10 people need a key for. Or an old POS that came with only one key, and you don't feel like spending money on keys and who's going to steal it anyway?
 
2014-03-30 01:40:10 PM  
karst:
/one did offer to open my drunk friend's trunk for him by shooting holes through it around the lock.
//drunk friend was underwhelmed.


"I'm underwhelmed" (voice from inside the trunk)
 
2014-03-30 01:42:59 PM  
In Florida, we were lucky that our workplace shared a fence with a fire station. We always made sure to stay on good terms with the firefighters, inviting them to our cookouts and other events and such. If any of my coworkers locked their keys in their car, it was just a simple matter of going next door and asking for help. A firefighter would come over with a bag of slim-jims, pop the lock and head back to the firehouse, all within about five minutes.
 
2014-03-30 01:52:04 PM  
On a somewhat related note, were Farkers aware that you can get free condoms at any US National Park or Monument?

/not obscure I hope.
 
2014-03-30 01:53:14 PM  

hardinparamedic: Jim_Callahan: An ambulance/fire truck coming out will cost you upwards of 2k$ sometimes if it's not an actual emergency and several hundred even if it  is an emergency sometimes, so I'm not sure the cunning plan was thought all the way through here.

Not true at all. What are you going to bill for? No fire or car accident - meaning no insurance billing of a fire fee, and no medical problem - meaning no way to bill unless the department has a serial abuser policy.


The time of the ambulance crew, I assume.

I think you're mistaking my statement of fact for something speculative.  I'm not saying they "might" bill you, they  do bill you for frivolous calls resulting in emergency vehicles being diverted.
 
2014-03-30 01:56:46 PM  
It's Colorado.  The lady's dope-addled hippie babysitter had the baby safely tucked into the Radarange,  while the pot roast slumbered quietly in the crib.

// hey, it happened to a cousin of my friend's ex-wife's hairstylist.  Swear it on a stack o' bibles.
 
2014-03-30 01:59:07 PM  
So she didn't want to spend money on a locksmith. And is now stuck spending more than that.  Brilliant move.
 
2014-03-30 02:04:19 PM  

Jim_Callahan: The time of the ambulance crew, I assume.

I think you're mistaking my statement of fact for something speculative.  I'm not saying they "might" bill you, they  do bill you for frivolous calls resulting in emergency vehicles being diverted.


That may be practice where you live, but it's a rather dubious one.

The only services I am aware that bill for frivelous calls are agencies who bill for treatment on scene with no transport (Rural/Metro would do this for treatment on scene/assessment on scene - frequently for poorly complaint diabetics who ended up getting an amp of D50 and a meal while the paramedic watched to keep their sugar up), community paramedicine housecalls (Doc in the Ambulance Box type calls), and system abuser bills.

It's against CMS rules to attempt to bill someone for a call where no treatment, and no transport was provided, and insanely easy to get those agencies that do that to throw the bill out.
 
2014-03-30 02:18:38 PM  

kim jong-un: On base, the MP had an inflatable baggie like a blood pressure cuff. It was awesome.


Yup. It was also slightly scary just how quickly he got my car door open.

/  Eight seconds.
//  And $50 for the dumbass tax.
 
2014-03-30 02:32:41 PM  
I remember, for a while in the 80s. they had emergency keys made cut into plastic like credit cards. In an emergency, just take it out of your billfold and use it.
But now, with those computer keys,
i called the dealer for a spare, said it has to be programmed for the car, and will cost $320 to do it, for one key. At least my wifes new car , if the transponder for the wireless goes out, a small key can be detached to get into the car.
With those prices, lucky I've saved my '67 Mustang.  Still runs like a top, after almost 50 years.
 
2014-03-30 02:49:10 PM  
Locked myself out of my old '86 Corolla once.  Don't ask me how, since you had to hold the doorhandle up to lock it, but I must've been high.  Anyway, so the boyfriend and I are outside trying to break into my car.  Cop pulls up and asked us what we were doing-guess he thought we were car thieves.  Anyway, after explaining what I did and him running my ID against the license plate, he popped the lock for me, with a warning, saying that cops really aren't supposed to do this (Denver, CO) but he took pity on me, I guess.  Significant other just locked the key in my '01 Corolla the other night and had to call AAA.  $98 later, got the car unlocked and the key back.  I need to make a spare...
 
2014-03-30 03:42:00 PM  
Most cars made now come with complimentary roadside assistance now. I know for Ford, it's 5yr/60000 miles. Lincoln is 6yr/70000 miles. The national average in most places in the country is an hour, on weekends, 90 minutes. If the service you need is a tire change or lockout service, generally those services can be dispatched faster, as a tow truck doesn't have to be dispatched. If you truly have locked the keys in the car and there is a child inside, call 911 first, don't call roadside assistance it's just wasting time as the roadside assistance agent is going to dispatch 911 for you anyway.
 
2014-03-30 04:03:13 PM  

MaritimeGirl: CAA/AAA will show up faster if you say you have a child or pet in the vehicle. As it is a paid service, it should be first come, first served so long as it isn't an emergency medical situation but then I suppose those people should call 911 instead of CAA/AAA.


Wow, screw you. I'm honest with AAA because I might need the local tow company they call again.

Longest I had to wait for a tow was 30 hours. But the car was in my driveway and it was a nasty snowstormy few days before Christmas. I'm safe, that's fair. Fastest... 15 minutes when a tire fell off a work van (facepalm) blocking 4 lanes of traffic (cops were there in 2).

/as it should be
 
2014-03-30 04:08:06 PM  

specialkae: Locked myself out of my old '86 Corolla once.  Don't ask me how, since you had to hold the doorhandle up to lock it, but I must've been high.  Anyway, so the boyfriend and I are outside trying to break into my car.  Cop pulls up and asked us what we were doing-guess he thought we were car thieves.  Anyway, after explaining what I did and him running my ID against the license plate, he popped the lock for me, with a warning, saying that cops really aren't supposed to do this (Denver, CO) but he took pity on me, I guess.  Significant other just locked the key in my '01 Corolla the other night and had to call AAA.  $98 later, got the car unlocked and the key back.  I need to make a spare...


I had no idea they charged that much. Consider a AAA membership. The cost is around half that (or at least here in CA), and for a year you get 4 free roadside assistance calls and a bunch of other stuff they offer.

My Civic also has that sort of lock on the driver's side where you have to pull the handle to lock it from the inside. The idea is so that you have to think before doing it, so you have a chance to remember where the keys are, but I've gotten used to doing it without thinking. Certain anti-stupidity features lose effectiveness over time. Fortunately, after the last time I locked my keys in there, I've always made sure they were in my pocket before closing the door.
 
2014-03-30 04:39:01 PM  

lizyrd: FirstNationalBastard: SecretAgentWoman: I understand why people don't want to pay $80-$200 for a duplicate key these days, but...

A door-only key well hidden outside the car or at least saved at home (so a friend can bring it to you) is a cheap, easy way to prevent this nonsense.

Depending on the car, a door-only key can be made for as little as 3 bucks. It only gets expensive with newer cars when you have to have the damn security chips programmed to start the ignition.

There's a way around that. The distance that the ignition will detect the chip is surprisingly far. Get a few cheap spare keys cut, and hide one of the chipped keys inside the car. Maybe remove part of the dash and tape it to the inside. If you're worried about leaving a key on the inside of the car, you could cut the blade off the key and only have the part with the chip in the car. A hardware store key should start the car. If you have it, the valet key that comes with many vehicles would be ideal for that use.


Will test your hypothesis...
 
2014-03-30 04:49:14 PM  

lizyrd: The distance that the ignition will detect the chip is surprisingly far.


There was a Top Gear episode (muscle cars on the salt flats) where Clarkson moved Hammond's challenger into traffic while an oblivious Hammond, and his remote key, were still relaxing in the diner. Looked like a good hundred feet or so before the car noticed the key wasn't moving along with it.
 
2014-03-30 05:08:26 PM  

specialkae: Locked myself out of my old '86 Corolla once.  Don't ask me how, since you had to hold the doorhandle up to lock it, but I must've been high.  Anyway, so the boyfriend and I are outside trying to break into my car.  Cop pulls up and asked us what we were doing-guess he thought we were car thieves.  Anyway, after explaining what I did and him running my ID against the license plate, he popped the lock for me, with a warning, saying that cops really aren't supposed to do this (Denver, CO) but he took pity on me, I guess.  Significant other just locked the key in my '01 Corolla the other night and had to call AAA.  $98 later, got the car unlocked and the key back.  I need to make a spare...


I keep a spare key for the Ranger in my wallet for that very reason.  I did lock myself out of the small truck once, but I got lucky and the rear window was open, so I used a broom stick to reach the inside door handle and unlock it.

Techniccal: Most cars made now come with complimentary roadside assistance now. I know for Ford, it's 5yr/60000 miles. Lincoln is 6yr/70000 miles. The national average in most places in the country is an hour, on weekends, 90 minutes. If the service you need is a tire change or lockout service, generally those services can be dispatched faster, as a tow truck doesn't have to be dispatched. If you truly have locked the keys in the car and there is a child inside, call 911 first, don't call roadside assistance it's just wasting time as the roadside assistance agent is going to dispatch 911 for you anyway.


My '03 Expedition has the key pad on the door exactly for this.  I just punch in a 5 digit number and the door unlocks.  I had a mechanic buddy look at it once, and later after he got done and I knew I would be picking it up after dark, I just had him lock the keys in it.  It was sitting there safe and ready for me.  I also keep that 5 digit number written down in my wallet in case I forget it.

cwolf20: So she didn't want to spend money on a locksmith. And is now stuck spending more than that.  Brilliant move.


I hope I'm right, but I think they left with her car still lock as well.  If they did, that would get the point across.
 
2014-03-30 05:22:50 PM  

duffblue: FirstNationalBastard: SecretAgentWoman: I understand why people don't want to pay $80-$200 for a duplicate key these days, but...

A door-only key well hidden outside the car or at least saved at home (so a friend can bring it to you) is a cheap, easy way to prevent this nonsense.

Depending on the car, a door-only key can be made for as little as 3 bucks. It only gets expensive with newer cars when you have to have the damn security chips programmed to start the ignition.

A door-only key wouldn't be used in the ignition.


Uh, from reading subby's headline, and TFA, the keys were locked inside the car.  A door-only key is the solution for when this happens.

-
Also, while many Police and Fire Departments might be willing to help - most won't accept the liability.
Most modern cars can't be opened with just a slim jim, and the attempt will often cause damage,  They break something, it's still your problem, and they get extra paperwork.
 
2014-03-30 06:30:51 PM  
Someone is going to have to explain exactly how the fark do you lock your keys in a car?

Exit car. Press button on remote to lock. If you left the remote inside the car.... hey! you can't lock the car!!
 
2014-03-30 06:34:23 PM  

sunderland56: Someone is going to have to explain exactly how the fark do you lock your keys in a car?

Exit car. Press button on remote to lock. If you left the remote inside the car.... hey! you can't lock the car!!


Holy crap you're brilliant. Work on Israel/Palestine next, k?
 
2014-03-30 06:58:15 PM  

CruJones: You can actually just ask a cop and either they'll help or get someone who will.

/spare key in magnet thing under truck


Admittedly I am a dumbass.

I once locked my keys in the car... with my dog... and the engine running.  Full tank of gas so lots of time for complications, and my dog has a talent for accidentally shifting the gears.  Baltimore FD said they could break my car window for me.  Baltimore PD said there was nothing they could do, I'd need to call a locksmith.  Eventually, one of the neighbors called the cops on two guys trying to open a car door with a bent hangar, so he showed up... and refused to slim-jim the door open.  Sat there in his squad car watching me in a controlled panic trying to get my dog to "shake paw" next to the door lock in hopes she'd pop it open.

Thankfully, my girl is a big adorable lovebug (yeah, I said it).  Nobody can resist her.  Eventually he relented and called some police unit that apparently specializes in... something... and since they happened to be in the area, they stopped by and got the door open.
 
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