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(The New Republic)   The brutal ageism of the IT industry   (newrepublic.com) divider line 217
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7705 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 Mar 2014 at 8:41 AM (29 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-30 08:39:54 AM  
You are most creative and easiest to exploit in your twenties.
 
2014-03-30 09:10:39 AM  
This is not news.

If you are planning on going into IT, better have a diversification plan for when you hit 40.  By the time outsourcing, offshoring, mergers, acquisitions, downsizing, and cloud computing nip at your organization your opportunities will begin to vanish.

If you lose your job to any of these past 40 without a backup plan, unless you've made it to Director or better, you're in serious trouble.
 
2014-03-30 09:11:31 AM  

EvilEgg: You are most creative and easiest to exploit in your twenties.


Also, the amount of shiat you'll put up with in your twenties would make most people in their thirties tell you to get lost.
 
2014-03-30 09:12:34 AM  
TFA was all over the place, but the focus is on what VCs in Silicon Valley are doing. That's got a lot of visibility but it's hardly a barometer of the entire industry.
 
2014-03-30 09:25:00 AM  
FTA: "Young people are just smarter," Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told an audience at Stanford back in 2007. As I write, the website of ServiceNow, a large Santa Clara-based I.T. services company, features the following advisory in large letters atop its "


I've been referring to that twat as "Schmuckerberg" for years.  He's going to learn that age and treachery overcome youth and inexperience.

I've been working on a BA for the last few years and have been amazed at how the so-called "tech smart" youth really aren't.  The bottom line is this: Just because you have a Facebook and Twitter account does not mean you are tech savvy.
 
2014-03-30 09:37:29 AM  
I think the article makes one very good point:  the emphasis on funding companies run by twentysomethings results in an overabundance of IT programs and apps that mostly twentysomethings want.  There are eighty kajillion "Saturday night with your bros" apps out there, about ten of which will make money.  Meanwhile, the leading software company in my industry has a main database product which hasn't had a version update in thirteen years--seriously, thirteen years.  One innovative and well-funded company could dominate the market within a year.  But the current leading company has tried repeatedly to introduce "fun new" social media add-ons to its product...which nobody wants, because our main customer base, and the people who make the purchasing decisions in the industry, are in their forties or older and are too savvy to be fooled by some cheap-looking Facebook/MySpace/insert social media app here.  It's like they're repeatedly slamming their head against a wall, trying to be the next Facebook or Tumblr, when all their customer base and their clients want is a database that actually works.

I knew about two competing companies which were trying to raise venture capital.  They weren't successful firstly because databases aren't some hip new product that nobody has ever thought of before, and secondly (again as the article said) because they're not going to be the "black swan" app that makes billions of dollars.  A product like this does have the potential to made nine figures, and would be a better bet than most venture-capital investments, but it simply wouldn't be cool enough for most angel investors?  A specialized database product?  Where's the cool in that?  So my department is still stuck with this thirteen-year-old product that is totally unsuited for our needs, with no better alternative out there.  I think five years from now we'll still be stuck with it, largely because of the mentality evident from this article.
 
2014-03-30 09:47:13 AM  

AngryDragon: If you lose your job to any of these past 40 without a backup plan, unless you've made it to Director or better, you're in serious trouble.


I'm in my late 40s and I think I'm doing alright.  Partly because I own several rental properties which I lease to the young pups and partly because I don't live on the west coast (thank Dog).
 
2014-03-30 09:48:51 AM  
Ageism? I'd assume a bigger problem would be the outsourcing of many tech jobs. Why hire any American when it's just cheaper to either send projects somewhere or just import whole groups of foreigners to do jobs on the cheap?
 
2014-03-30 09:49:42 AM  

EvilEgg: You are most creative


Then they should hire a few people in their twenties to think shiat up and be creative and then hire people with coding experience who have seen various issues a few times to actually build the damn thing.

and easiest to exploit in your twenties.

Oh...
 
2014-03-30 09:53:57 AM  

The Third Man: One innovative and well-funded company could dominate the market within a year.


I hand-picked this to reply to, but do you really believe that? Most companies are completely invested in the safest, most well known, biggest, corporation for their critical applications (and databases sure as fark count as that 99% of the time).

It's not like some little company could whip up a new approach to this, and be embraced industry wide; companies would have to retool stuff to fit, no matter what the new company did, and there's no interest in doing that unless a serious issue (like end of life, loss of hardware comparability, etc.) occurs.
 
2014-03-30 09:56:44 AM  
The world of tech start ups is different than the day to day world of application/data base support.
 
2014-03-30 10:05:04 AM  
FTFA:

 At which point another long-running debate began to elbow Romney aside. This one was about the anatomy of "midget dildos." One camp believed little people used regular-sized implements. The other insisted they had miniature versions. Both held their views with impressive conviction. Soon, a debater was illustrating with his hands..."

Thanks for the education, Fark.
 
2014-03-30 10:09:54 AM  
Buzzfeed loves lists.  They should have a list of the 100 b.s. lines that you get if you're over 40 and looking for a tech job.

1.  You were a VP at Microsoft?  You're overqualified.
2.  People over 40 don't get the Internet.
3.  You stayed at your last job five years ... clearly you're not a risk-taker.
4.  We're looking for someone with a Ph.D. in quantum computing with 10 years industry experience and under age 30.
5.  You wouldn't fit with the culture here.

.
.
.
 
2014-03-30 10:10:41 AM  
Ageism? Not in Mainframe Support - they have the opposite problem. You can't find kids that know how to use ISPF, JCL and program in COBOL & FORTRAN

/Yes, companies still use mainframes
 
2014-03-30 10:12:44 AM  
Interesting article, but did it have to be 12,000 words? He could have stopped after the first example.
 
2014-03-30 10:13:16 AM  

AngryDragon: If you lose your job to any of these past 40 without a backup plan, unless you've made it to Director or better, you're in serious trouble.


Bullshiat.
Define, "serious trouble."

/If you think this, you are part of the problem.
 
2014-03-30 10:14:42 AM  
Because as everyone knows, each new generation discovered sex for the first time.
Naive 20-somethings have their place as cogs in the machine, let them think they matter in the long run.

Life begins at 40.
 
2014-03-30 10:15:07 AM  

HighlanderRPI: Ageism? Not in Mainframe Support - they have the opposite problem. You can't find kids that know how to use ISPF, JCL and program in COBOL & FORTRAN

/Yes, companies still use mainframes


This is true. We have an old codger who does COBOL for us. He works from home a lot. Probably owns a murder shed.
 
2014-03-30 10:16:15 AM  

kroonermanblack: The Third Man: One innovative and well-funded company could dominate the market within a year.

I hand-picked this to reply to, but do you really believe that? Most companies are completely invested in the safest, most well known, biggest, corporation for their critical applications (and databases sure as fark count as that 99% of the time).

It's not like some little company could whip up a new approach to this, and be embraced industry wide; companies would have to retool stuff to fit, no matter what the new company did, and there's no interest in doing that unless a serious issue (like end of life, loss of hardware comparability, etc.) occurs.


They also like to keep the safest most well known people running those critical applications.

TFA is useless drivel.
 
2014-03-30 10:18:12 AM  

HighlanderRPI: Ageism? Not in Mainframe Support - they have the opposite problem. You can't find kids that know how to use ISPF, JCL and program in COBOL & FORTRAN

/Yes, companies still use mainframes


An exciting career awaits me in buggy whip maintenance?  Hold on let me get my hat & suitcase!  Wait you are expecting me to already know how do to that and won't train me?  Sorry I'll stick to 21rst century tech.

Does it go something like that?
 
2014-03-30 10:22:07 AM  

Gary-L: FTA: "Young people are just smarter," Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told an audience at Stanford back in 2007. As I write, the website of ServiceNow, a large Santa Clara-based I.T. services company, features the following advisory in large letters atop its "


I've been referring to that twat as "Schmuckerberg" for years.  He's going to learn that age and treachery overcome youth and inexperience.

I've been working on a BA for the last few years and have been amazed at how the so-called "tech smart" youth really aren't.  The bottom line is this: Just because you have a Facebook and Twitter account does not mean you are tech savvy.


That Boy Sugarmountain would say something like this surprises me very little. It's typically callow and unselfconscious to the point of threatening to expose his Aspergery side.
When Sugarmountain boy decides to go raise orchids in Cambodia and sells facebook to amazon for a gazillion dollars, we'll see how smart he really is.
 
2014-03-30 10:22:28 AM  
Time will change this tune. This jokers will wake up one day and find themselves to be forty.
 
2014-03-30 10:24:11 AM  
TFA: There were words but they didn't make sense.
 
2014-03-30 10:25:39 AM  
www.1amgeek.com

/hot
//yes, i pressed the big button on the front of the box.
///wait, i have to press it again?  that turns it back on??
 
2014-03-30 10:31:27 AM  

Prophet of Loss: Time will change this tune. This jokers will wake up one day and find themselves to be forty.


And there will be no more room in the sandbox for them to play.
 
2014-03-30 10:32:50 AM  

skinink: Ageism? I'd assume a bigger problem would be the outsourcing of many tech jobs. Why hire any American when it's just cheaper to either send projects somewhere or just import whole groups of foreigners to do jobs on the cheap?


I outsource tech jobs or sponsor H1B workers because I can't find tech workers in the United States.  Trying hiring good system admins, design engineers, or info-sec people sometime.  We've had four positions open for almost a year now.

/42 here
//doing just fine
 
2014-03-30 10:35:05 AM  

gingerjet: skinink: Ageism? I'd assume a bigger problem would be the outsourcing of many tech jobs. Why hire any American when it's just cheaper to either send projects somewhere or just import whole groups of foreigners to do jobs on the cheap?

I outsource tech jobs or sponsor H1B workers because I can't find tech workers in the United States.  Trying hiring good system admins, design engineers, or info-sec people sometime.  We've had four positions open for almost a year now.

/42 here
//doing just fine


As someone who knows a lot of those people who are looking for work, please post links to the job offers and I can either point out why those positions aren't getting filled or pass them along.
 
2014-03-30 10:36:00 AM  

Cymbal: This is true. We have an old codger who does COBOL for us. He works from home a lot. Probably owns a murder shed.


My dad is 75 and some recruiter called him up to do part time work for a mainframe shop for what would of been close to 100k/year.  He laughed.

/he is still working on spending all the money he made during the fake Y2K crisis
 
2014-03-30 10:38:33 AM  
And they'll get their ass handed to them by Japan, a culture that respects the elderly.
 
2014-03-30 10:42:09 AM  
In my anecdotal experience, the younger folks are more willing to hear criticism and take advice on their coding practices than the over 40 crowd. I think it's the "I've been in this industry since you were in diapers, don't tell me how to code you little pissant." mentality. From what I've seen, the younger guys want to learn while the older guys seem to just want to coast on what they already know.

My team is dealing with the fallout of this mentality right now. One of our veteran coders quit a few months ago and we're coming to the realization that he didn't have a clue about OOP principles and in fact wasn't a very good programmer. Everyone just assumed he was because he'd been doing it for so long. We're cleaning up the web apps he left behind because they're starting to bring down servers, both web and database. I mean, I would have to try real hard to write something that bad.
 
2014-03-30 10:44:08 AM  
I've often wondered why there hasn't been any age discrimination lawsuits in tech, it seems like easy pickings for litigation? Too easy to obfuscate your company out of harm's way?
 
2014-03-30 10:45:18 AM  

gingerjet: Cymbal: This is true. We have an old codger who does COBOL for us. He works from home a lot. Probably owns a murder shed.

My dad is 75 and some recruiter called him up to do part time work for a mainframe shop for what would of been close to 100k/year.  He laughed.

/he is still working on spending all the money he made during the fake Y2K crisis


I'm 45 and contemplating making a killing doing contract COBOL work.


/Cut my teeth on COBOL in the 90s
//Can't understand why "smart" Gen Y "coders" find procedural languages confusing
 
2014-03-30 10:49:26 AM  

BumpInTheNight: HighlanderRPI: Ageism? Not in Mainframe Support - they have the opposite problem. You can't find kids that know how to use ISPF, JCL and program in COBOL & FORTRAN

/Yes, companies still use mainframes

An exciting career awaits me in buggy whip maintenance?  Hold on let me get my hat & suitcase!  Wait you are expecting me to already know how do to that and won't train me?  Sorry I'll stick to 21rst century tech.

Does it go something like that?


It amazes me companies want to fill positions in what is now niche technology and they don't want to train. Good luck with that. Let us know how it works out
 
2014-03-30 10:50:13 AM  

Cymbal: HighlanderRPI: Ageism? Not in Mainframe Support - they have the opposite problem. You can't find kids that know how to use ISPF, JCL and program in COBOL & FORTRAN

/Yes, companies still use mainframes

This is true. We have an old codger who does COBOL for us. He works from home a lot. Probably owns a murder shed.


Well owning is just so much more logical than renting a murder shed.
 
2014-03-30 10:51:49 AM  
Dafuq did I just read?

/Article read like it was written by a hopped up meth addict.
 
2014-03-30 10:52:54 AM  

gingerjet: I outsource tech jobs or sponsor H1B workers because I can't find tech workers in the United States.  Trying hiring good system admins, design engineers, or info-sec people sometime.  We've had four positions open for almost a year now.


This is because you're unwilling to train.
But I'm sure you can't find a single American intelligent enough to learn, right?
Or who fits your company culture.
Or who is pretty enough.
Or young enough.

The search for the perfect candidate continues, right?
 
2014-03-30 10:55:58 AM  

gingerjet: Cymbal: This is true. We have an old codger who does COBOL for us. He works from home a lot. Probably owns a murder shed.

My dad is 75 and some recruiter called him up to do part time work for a mainframe shop for what would of been close to 100k/year.  He laughed.

/he is still working on spending all the money he made during the fake Y2K crisis


Y2K wasn't fake, the money spent needed to be spent, there were plenty of billing and CIS systems out there that needed updates or they would fail.  The "embedded crisis" was overhyped, while there were plenty of HVAC and other mechanical systems that couldn't manage the date change no one really cares or even notices if the elevator thinks it's the 1982.

Or another way, if you think Y2K was fake, then you should become a climate change denier.  Because if successful efforts are made to reduce climate change; after the fact folks will be saying "Why did we spend all that money for something that never happened?"
 
2014-03-30 10:56:40 AM  
Gestalt: I've often wondered why there hasn't been any age discrimination lawsuits in tech, it seems like easy pickings for litigation? Too easy to obfuscate your company out of harm's way?

Labor is so goddamn plentiful you can fire IT for any reason you like. Usually, because you wont work 27 hour days.

/Artificial wage manipulation on the part of tech companies are a bigger problem.
//IT people are actually systematically discriminated against, with the whole industry colluding to prevent companies from hiring workers away at better pay.
///Also if you invent something in your free time. Your company owns it now. fark off.
////Cry me a river ladies about how you can't ask for more money in your interview and how that's discrimination.
 
2014-03-30 10:57:49 AM  

Cymbal: HighlanderRPI: Ageism? Not in Mainframe Support - they have the opposite problem. You can't find kids that know how to use ISPF, JCL and program in COBOL & FORTRAN

/Yes, companies still use mainframes

This is true. We have an old codger who does COBOL for us. He works from home a lot. Probably owns a murder shed.


I wouldn't blame him - I'd want to kill people if I had to program in COBOL all day.

/One place I worked had a blind VAX/VMS support guy. I assumed he just developed a sixth sense about VAXes and didn't need to see the terminal....
 
2014-03-30 10:58:11 AM  

HotIgneous Intruder: This is because you're unwilling to train.
But I'm sure you can't find a single American intelligent enough to learn, right?
Or who fits your company culture.
Or who is pretty enough.
Or young enough.

The search for the perfect candidate continues, right?


It's because he wants to pay his infosec and IT people 9 bucks an hour, and have us work for tips.
 
2014-03-30 10:58:51 AM  

xalres: In my anecdotal experience, the younger folks are more willing to hear criticism and take advice on their coding practices than the over 40 crowd. I think it's the "I've been in this industry since you were in diapers, don't tell me how to code you little pissant." mentality. From what I've seen, the younger guys want to learn while the older guys seem to just want to coast on what they already know.

My team is dealing with the fallout of this mentality right now. One of our veteran coders quit a few months ago and we're coming to the realization that he didn't have a clue about OOP principles and in fact wasn't a very good programmer. Everyone just assumed he was because he'd been doing it for so long. We're cleaning up the web apps he left behind because they're starting to bring down servers, both web and database. I mean, I would have to try real hard to write something that bad.


1) They young are fearful for their jobs.
2) Shiatty work is not a function of age.
3) If a you made a bad hire, it's your fault. Or maybe HR's fault.
4) Always blame others for your failings -- it's the American way.
 
2014-03-30 10:59:11 AM  

kroonermanblack: The Third Man: One innovative and well-funded company could dominate the market within a year.

I hand-picked this to reply to, but do you really believe that? Most companies are completely invested in the safest, most well known, biggest, corporation for their critical applications (and databases sure as fark count as that 99% of the time).

It's not like some little company could whip up a new approach to this, and be embraced industry wide; companies would have to retool stuff to fit, no matter what the new company did, and there's no interest in doing that unless a serious issue (like end of life, loss of hardware comparability, etc.) occurs.


In our case, yeah.  We've long outgrown the database product put out by the leading company.  We can't even run simple exports anymore--we have to put all of the information into a data warehouse and run SQL queries off of that.  It's a terrible solution, because we've got customers' personal data in there and obviously having effectively two databases, one of which is homegrown, doubles your chances of something happening to it.  Not to mention we have to hire two programmers whose only task is to write SQL queries, when the original database had an export and reporting tool that was easy enough for non-programmers to use.  (The only person in the office not specifically hired to run SQL queries who can do so is myself, and I've only been there for four weeks.)  We've looked into other industry database solutions, but they're either user-unfriendly for our sales team or prone to downtime or data loss, and our higher-ups feel we can't have that.

So the problem is, we are already retooling our database to fit our needs, and this duct-tape-and-bailing-wire solution is costing us probably a couple hundred thousand a year in programmer salaries, warehouse storage space, lost time in getting information, etc...not to mention it's a terribly unstable way of keeping our information intact  We'd gladly rather pay $200K upfront and $50K a year for a database solution that actually worked, and I can name off the top of my head at least twenty organizations that in the same boat.  Heck, I know some places that have completely homegrown databases or are shoehorning unsuitable solutions like PeopleSoft to be used for a completely different purpose because they're better than what else is out there. These are organizations that completely rely on their databases and would be dead without them--and one of them had a near-total data loss from their homegrown database a while back.  (They had a backup but they had to put everything on hold for a couple of weeks while the programmers restored it and ran an audit to figure out what happened.)  I think that organization might pay a million for a stable, secure database they could actually use.

In other words, the problem we've got is one of stability.  Our database isn't stable or robust enough to perform the functions we need, and every day we add information (in other words, every day) the problem gets worse.  The other programmers and end-users I talk to hate the leading database, it's a mess of spaghetti code with a user interface that was outdated a decade ago.  If there was a better solution out there, we'd take it in a heartbeat.
 
2014-03-30 11:01:52 AM  
63, doing fine.  I work in a niche market that is no longer popular.
 
2014-03-30 11:02:56 AM  

Flint Ironstag: Cymbal: HighlanderRPI: Ageism? Not in Mainframe Support - they have the opposite problem. You can't find kids that know how to use ISPF, JCL and program in COBOL & FORTRAN

/Yes, companies still use mainframes

This is true. We have an old codger who does COBOL for us. He works from home a lot. Probably owns a murder shed.

Well owning is just so much more logical than renting a murder shed.


Or time-sharing.
 
2014-03-30 11:03:48 AM  

fluffy2097: HotIgneous Intruder: This is because you're unwilling to train.
But I'm sure you can't find a single American intelligent enough to learn, right?
Or who fits your company culture.
Or who is pretty enough.
Or young enough.

The search for the perfect candidate continues, right?

It's because he wants to pay his infosec and IT people 9 bucks an hour, and have us work for tips.


It's the same across the entire American economy, welder, truck drivers, retail, IT, manufacturing.
The wage depression is across the board and people still whine about "skills gaps" and "jobs going begging."
It's bullshiat excuse-making by employers who don't want to take the time to invest in their employees by training them.
That training investment is tax deductible, dumbasses.

Meanwhile, they whine about how they can't fill the positions.
Millions of people out there of all ages who are willing to work and learn starting today, right now.
 
2014-03-30 11:06:42 AM  

Gestalt: I've often wondered why there hasn't been any age discrimination lawsuits in tech, it seems like easy pickings for litigation? Too easy to obfuscate your company out of harm's way?


That's pretty much it.  My husband worked for about 2 weeks for a company that was basically contract IT departments for smaller businesses that couldn't afford full time, in house IT departments.

The company employed mostly 20 and 30 somethings.  "Staff meetings" were happy hour at the nearest bar, "shop talk" consisted of discussing how many phone numbers the guys picked up at the bar or how drunk they got over the weekend.  There was only one other guy at the office that had a child - who was 30.5 years younger than my husband's youngest stepdaughter.

After two weeks, he was released because "he didn't fit in with the corporate culture".  Mostly because he'd gotten their "corporate culture" out of his system about the time most of these kids were born.
 
2014-03-30 11:09:23 AM  
gingerjet:   Trying hiring good system admins, design engineers, or info-sec people sometime.  We've had four positions open for almost a year now.


It's you doing something wrong.
 
2014-03-30 11:11:22 AM  
There's a truth in the article, but it's distorted by the wide horizon of the industry today. There are two aspects that have gone mad in the past half decade.

The first is in the area of tablet apps - we're all aware that the PC has taken a beating with the rise of the tablet, and that the tablet, in its vast majority, is used as an expensive toy. Software-based recreation, low-powered distraction stuff. You could probably have written this same article 20 years ago about the sports equipment industry, when the specialty bike/skateboard/ etc. stuff started to bloom. "Wally Martin, Production Manager of Schwinn Bicycles, gestured across his production line, lamenting, "Kids just don't want a bike anymore. They want to jump on rocks and do tricks. All of these upstarts are out there, putting springs and little stand platforms everywhere..."

New ideas offer new opportunities, and I think we all know that old-timers in any industry are change-resistant (anybody else remember the difficulty of getting newspapers online?), which gives a new generation a chance to man new businesses and enter the marketplace.

These new companies, built and manned by younger generations, will naturally be culturally adverse to letting Uncle Wilbur in. And, if you read between the lines of the articles, probably rightfully so. "I'm the token grown up." "They act like college bros." Whiney, whiney, whiney.

Yes - maybe they do act like college bros. And it's their company, and it's the way they want to do things, and they don't want some jerk coming in and telling them to grow up and they're doing it wrong. I don't think IBM is going to hire some kid with two sleeve tattoos, a Bieber cut and a tee-shirt come in and biatch about how uptight the atmosphere is. Rise or fall, it's their clubhouse - they get to run it the way they choose.

The second area is the El Dorado hunt for making money off of "Community." All the programmers need to do is to build a framework, and users pay to provide you with content you sell. Think "Angie's List." You pay to access other peoples' opinions about stuff. In fact, you also pay for the privilege of providing those reviews that are the solitary reason anyone would come to the site in the first place. There's probably small money to be made in providing a service that provides small businesses a boost in positive reviews on Angie's List, and offsetting negative reviews with more positive ones on a subscription basis.

These shoe-tree models are attractive because (if they work) they are completely self generating. The problem is, there's no way - short, perhaps of huge advertising costs - to get the shiat to stick. You need to be first, and grow fast: have a look at "Trip Advisor" as a great example of a successful shoe tree. Now try to find a travel site shoe tree even a fraction as successful. (Keep in mind that "Cruise Critic" is a wholly owned subsidiary of "Trip Advisor.")

The community generating sites are like honey to the arrogance of youth, because they Know they have the pulse of their generation, and they can magically generate traffic from micro-niche interests or just because they think they can build something that is "better" than the other ten guys who had the same idea already. Wrinklies are on the outs in places like that, and are much better off for it.
 
hej
2014-03-30 11:18:13 AM  

Mr. Eugenides: gingerjet: Cymbal: This is true. We have an old codger who does COBOL for us. He works from home a lot. Probably owns a murder shed.

My dad is 75 and some recruiter called him up to do part time work for a mainframe shop for what would of been close to 100k/year.  He laughed.

/he is still working on spending all the money he made during the fake Y2K crisis

Y2K wasn't fake, the money spent needed to be spent, there were plenty of billing and CIS systems out there that needed updates or they would fail.  The "embedded crisis" was overhyped, while there were plenty of HVAC and other mechanical systems that couldn't manage the date change no one really cares or even notices if the elevator thinks it's the 1982.

Or another way, if you think Y2K was fake, then you should become a climate change denier.  Because if successful efforts are made to reduce climate change; after the fact folks will be saying "Why did we spend all that money for something that never happened?"


The software bug was real. The hysteria that everything with software in it was going to stop functioning when the new millennium rolled around was quite manufactured.
 
2014-03-30 11:22:25 AM  

hej: The software bug was real. The hysteria that everything with software in it was going to stop functioning when the new millennium rolled around was quite manufactured.


We need to remember for Y2038: Let some major systems fail. Have a couple of cities lose power because the patches didn't get installed on time. Be sure to do it in the South, so you're not actually killing anyone, though.

/worked my behind off in 1999
 
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