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(Yahoo)   RIP USS Miami, SSN-755, decommissioned today and headed off to the scrap yard. A boat that proudly served in three different conflicts was destroyed by a lazy shipyard worker who wanted to leave work early   (news.yahoo.com ) divider line 35
    More: Sad, USS Miami, Miami, navies, Kittery, Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, boats, arsons  
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18003 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Mar 2014 at 8:26 PM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


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ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-03-29 04:35:46 PM  
6 votes:
It took 12 hours and the efforts of more than 100 firefighters to save the vessel.

"Save"?

I wish they could cut up the worker and sell off the parts for salvage value.
2014-03-29 08:31:05 PM  
5 votes:
A ship is made out of metal.  Just common metal.

The crew is what makes a ship great.
2014-03-29 09:15:28 PM  
3 votes:

puffy999: Is there no where else to fix the vessel or to cut it up?

If floating it saves so much money by taking a relatively long route from the Snake River down the Colombia and all the way around Juan De Fuca, why not fix it sooner and utilize the Mississippi/Missouri/Ohio Rivers as well?


Puget Sound is the only place equipped to remove the reactor from a boat because it's the closest Naval facility to the normal resting place for reactors. Every single nuclear powered boat or ship that's been decommissioned (save one, which is a museum ship) has gone there. If it's going to Idaho it's possible that they plan on setting up the reactor compartment for training. At one time there was a reactor built there specifically to train new reactor operators and the people operating the rest of the engineering plant (steam, cooling water, lube oil and so on) before they went to the fleet. I only say this because the usual fate of submarine reactors is in a big pit over in Hanford WA. In those cases Puget Sound removes the fuel, cuts out the entire reactor compartment, caps off both ends with a couple of inches of steel then barges it off for a trip up the Columbia. When it gets to Hanford it's taken off of the barge and s.l.o.w.l.y. moved inland to a huge pit where, last time I heard, there are over 100 other similarly prepared reactor compartments. When that pit is filled it will be capped off and left alone for some 600 years. The rest of the boat is salvaged for parts that can be refurbished and reused elsewhere in the navy and then the rest is sold for scrap.

As to fixing it the cost to do that was higher than the cost of a new boat. A submarine fire in the shipyard isn't quite as bad as one at sea. In the shipyard there are open hatches for the heat to get out as well as hull cuts (used to remove large pieces of gear that can't fit through a hatch). That being said there is much more damage than possible heat damage to the hull. Smoke carries acids that coat electronics rendering them essentially worthless in a short amount of time. The heat can damage valve guts and mechanical joints, each of which has to be opened up, inspected and repaired then put back in place then tested to either level one or subsafe standards. Every inch of wiring also has to be inspected (and there are literally hundreds of miles of wires in a modern submarine). All of that costs money with no guarantee that there still won't be some problems later on, and believe me when I say that nobody wants to be at test depth on a boat that is even a tiny bit questionable materially speaking. I took a boat out of Newport News after a refueling overhaul back in the 80's and the stories I could tell you would scare the crap out of you. Several seawater valves that had bolts that were only hand tight was probably one of the worst ones but there were other problems too. We ended up being about 6 months overdue for leaving while the shipyard went over everything that they worked on with a fine toothed comb.
2014-03-29 08:50:22 PM  
3 votes:

Man On Pink Corner: <i>Seeking an excuse to leave work early, Casey James Fury set fire to a box of rags on a bunk, and the blaze quickly spread throughout the forward compartments. Fury pleaded guilty and is serving a 17-year sentence in federal prison.</i>

I don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?


Paint burns, wires burn, chairs and bedding and curtains (every bunk has one) burn.  Papers, they burn too.  Computers burn. There's a ton of stuff in every ship that can burn.  Do you think these are sterile stainless steel operating room (stuff in there that can burn too) vessels where everyone walks, sleeps, and lives on bare stainless steel?  In the case of an actual war, there are repair lockers manned by people like myself that are trained to not only do my regular job (avionics in my case), but also to fight fires, seal ruptures in pipes, contain flooding, defend your right to be stupid, many other jobs.
2014-03-29 08:46:10 PM  
3 votes:

Man On Pink Corner: <i>Seeking an excuse to leave work early, Casey James Fury set fire to a box of rags on a bunk, and the blaze quickly spread throughout the forward compartments. Fury pleaded guilty and is serving a 17-year sentence in federal prison.</i>

I don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?


More blood for the blood god.  The military over pays for everything and everyone gets their palms greased on the side.  Nam was nothing more than a made up scenario to go to war to sell US new hardware.
2014-03-29 08:38:00 PM  
3 votes:
He sought an excuse to leave work early. Now he has 17 years to think about how nice a regular job would be.
2014-03-29 08:35:58 PM  
3 votes:

Man On Pink Corner: <i>Seeking an excuse to leave work early, Casey James Fury set fire to a box of rags on a bunk, and the blaze quickly spread throughout the forward compartments. Fury pleaded guilty and is serving a 17-year sentence in federal prison.</i>

I don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?


It was in the shipyard, so not only was its own fire-supression system turned off, there was tons of flammable material that wouldn't otherwise be there scattered around.
2014-03-29 08:34:12 PM  
3 votes:

TheGreatGazoo: You would think a nuclear sub would have a better fire suppression system.


It was off due to the work being done
2014-03-29 06:04:14 PM  
3 votes:
And the defense contractors building the thing are happier than pigs in shiat because they're insured and get to build a new one.

Just a guess.
2014-03-29 09:22:04 PM  
2 votes:
That asshole intentionally set fire to a motherfarking nuclear submarine and all he gets is 17 years?
2014-03-29 09:01:05 PM  
2 votes:

vincentfox: Big machine damaged & scrapped, why this is SAD eludes me.


Because it's a billion dollar machine built at taxpayers' expense and completely destroyed by an intentionally-set fire.

Suppose that 10 years ago a Space Shuttle had been destroyed in similar fashion without loss of life (and before becoming a museum piece). Would you have been sad about that?
2014-03-29 09:00:15 PM  
2 votes:

puffy999: NEDM: Because I'm not sure you can get something the size of a nuclear submarine up the Missouri River that far. And I don't even know if they've linked the Columbia River to the Mississippi River system with canals or not. I don't think they have.

I'm not suggesting the whole distance, obviously. However, if towing that far would save so much money relative to the MUCH shorter driving distance between Boise (? I don't know where that facility is) and Bremerton, other river systems could be utilized to some degree. Even shipping to Pittsburgh and towing to some location on the Mississippi should then be somewhat cost effective, IF indeed it could be fixed to such a degree on the east coast.


It is much MUCH cheaper to hire a tug to tow the hulk from Maine to Washington than it would to try and lift a 5750 ton submarine out of the water and try and truck it over the Rocky Mountains.  In fact, I don't know if there is even a truck that can carry something that big in the US.  If there is, its daily rate is much MUCH MUCH more than the rate for a single ocean-going tug.
2014-03-29 08:54:10 PM  
2 votes:
Holy shiat, dude. Treason much?
2014-03-29 08:52:05 PM  
2 votes:

ecmoRandomNumbers: And the defense contractors building the thing are happier than pigs in shiat because they're insured and get to build a new one.

Just a guess.


It wasn't being built, it was undergoing maintenance.  The insurance companies are on the hook and the contractor may have his rates go up after a hit like that.  The navy is out a ship that still had useful life and the replacements are more capable but will be in fewer numbers and not in service for years.  No one is happy about that loss for such a stupid reason.
2014-03-29 08:51:04 PM  
2 votes:
Big machine damaged & scrapped, why this is SAD eludes me.
2014-03-29 08:48:53 PM  
2 votes:

subfactorial: DanInKansas: Man On Pink Corner: don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?

You.   You go read this right now. Your local library has a copy.

Short answer: naval warfare is horrifying.

Longer answer: You're less likely to die in combat as a sailor but if you do it's always in an incredibly painful way, like being shredded by a pressure wave, incinerated in a fire, cut in half by a bulkhead door slamming shut, etc., etc., etc.

Well actually only one of those is probably painful in any meaningful way. The 1st and 3rd leave a godawful mess for whoever cleans up after you, particularly the first one, but you'd be unlikely to feel a thing.

Doesn't make it any less horrible of course.

...and fark this guy who burnt up that boat. Arson to get off work early? I'm usually against really lengthy setences since people lose perspective on just how long 5-10-20 years is but this guy... 17 doesn't seem like enough.


Man On Pink Corner forgot about being eviscerated by a leak in a high pressure pipe.  Just walking along and there's a microscopic leak in a 5000lb pipe.  You can't even see it.  Then the top half of your body leaves the bottom half. 

Being a submariner, good times.
2014-03-29 08:46:20 PM  
2 votes:

DanInKansas: Man On Pink Corner: don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?

You.   You go read this right now. Your local library has a copy.

Short answer: naval warfare is horrifying.

Longer answer: You're less likely to die in combat as a sailor but if you do it's always in an incredibly painful way, like being shredded by a pressure wave, incinerated in a fire, cut in half by a bulkhead door slamming shut, etc., etc., etc.


Well actually only one of those is probably painful in any meaningful way. The 1st and 3rd leave a godawful mess for whoever cleans up after you, particularly the first one, but you'd be unlikely to feel a thing.

Doesn't make it any less horrible of course.

...and fark this guy who burnt up that boat. Arson to get off work early? I'm usually against really lengthy setences since people lose perspective on just how long 5-10-20 years is but this guy... 17 doesn't seem like enough.
2014-03-29 08:45:16 PM  
2 votes:

puffy999: Is there no where else to fix the vessel or to cut it up?

If floating it saves so much money by taking a relatively long route from the Snake River down the Colombia and all the way around Juan De Fuca, why not fix it sooner and utilize the Mississippi/Missouri/Ohio Rivers as well?


It's HY80, due to the fire, it's been tempered in the wrong way.  There's no fixing that hull.
2014-03-29 08:44:29 PM  
2 votes:

NightOwl2255: TheGreatGazoo: You would think a nuclear sub would have a better fire suppression system.

It was off due to the work being done


Had this discussion back when it happened. The primary fire suppression system is the 300 or so submariners crowding the submarine.
2014-03-29 08:39:01 PM  
2 votes:

Man On Pink Corner: <i>Seeking an excuse to leave work early, Casey James Fury set fire to a box of rags on a bunk, and the blaze quickly spread throughout the forward compartments. Fury pleaded guilty and is serving a 17-year sentence in federal prison.</i>

I don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?


In such a contained space and considering hte materials inside, the fire gets extremely hot very fast. like melty hot.
2014-03-29 08:37:15 PM  
2 votes:

Man On Pink Corner: don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?


You.   You go read this right now. Your local library has a copy.

Short answer: naval warfare is horrifying.

Longer answer: You're less likely to die in combat as a sailor but if you do it's always in an incredibly painful way, like being shredded by a pressure wave, incinerated in a fire, cut in half by a bulkhead door slamming shut, etc., etc., etc.
2014-03-29 11:17:09 PM  
1 vote:

ReapTheChaos: You're talking about a vessel that spends 95% of it's time completely submerged in corrosive salt water, short of the guys who work on the nuclear reactor, there is no job more critical than paint. This is true of any ship to be honest. He's probably one of the better paid guys working there.


Uh. No. The hull gets painted maybe every 5 years or so, drydocks are expensive. Topside more often, maybe once a year. Inside paint is not really all that important in the grand scheme of things. I've watched a shipyard painter spend an hour smearing paint over the same few square feet of interior bulkhead while staring off into space. There are a couple of important places that get painted (mainly inside tanks and some of the bilges) but 99% of it is cosmetic. In the 8+ years I spent on boats we spent maybe a grand total of 2 weeks painting the exterior above the waterline. The interior is also rarely painted (paint is an atmospheric contaminant and it's very unusual to even carry any on board, not even touch up paint).

Keep in mind that on the surface most of the boat is underwater and much of what you see is not pressure hull but superstructure (free flooding spaces). When submerged corrosion is almost non-existent because of the extensive use of zincs both inside and out. Surface ships are not submarines. they use different grades of steel and take a beating that submarines just simply aren't usually exposed to.

By far the most painting I did was while I was on shore duty (museum ship) and 99% of that was fixing what the shipyard did wrong (Mare Island). Shipyard painters are, in general, crappy workers and they don't get paid anywhere near what the more skilled workers get paid.
2014-03-29 09:34:35 PM  
1 vote:
If only submarines were surrounded by a substance commonly used to douse fires.
2014-03-29 09:17:35 PM  
1 vote:

Ambivalence: Considering how many people are in the military, I'm actually kind of impressed this kind of thing doesn't happen more often.  Statistically speaking.


He wasn't in the military, he was a civilian worker at the shipyard where it was being worked on.
2014-03-29 09:08:28 PM  
1 vote:
I worked with a guy who was a Nuke tech or whatever they call it, in the Navy.  He was on a boomer sub.  Said the most scared he was going to die his whole time in the Navy was leaving the shipyards.  Hated the yard workers.  One guy welded clear through the control cable leading from the Con to the nuke.  Another was not following procedure carrying wrenches up the ladder, dropped it like 30 feet onto a crewman and fractured his skull. There were plenty more stories, from just one visit to the yards.

After that he was sure their first cruise out would be their last.
2014-03-29 09:04:36 PM  
1 vote:

puffy999: Basically, why even bother floating and towing it if they are going to ship the thing all the way to Idaho, unless that's literally the only place that can handle the sub?


Remember the sub has the whole nuclear reactor thing too. I'm guessing finding a ship yard that has security clearances and the ability to decommission vessels with nuclear reactors is just a touch harder than finding one that will cut apart an old barge.
2014-03-29 08:58:48 PM  
1 vote:

BalugaJoe: You would think they would better screen these people.


more dumb asses work at the shipyards than any where else
2014-03-29 08:45:46 PM  
1 vote:
Now that dumbass worker isn't going to go home for years, if ever at all (come on you guys with shanks. Don't fail us now).
2014-03-29 08:44:02 PM  
1 vote:

Man On Pink Corner: <i>Seeking an excuse to leave work early, Casey James Fury set fire to a box of rags on a bunk, and the blaze quickly spread throughout the forward compartments. Fury pleaded guilty and is serving a 17-year sentence in federal prison.</i>

I don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?


Ships are at their most vulnerable when not manned and in port. The automatic suppression system was turned off....which seems very silly to have the entire system turned off....the decks were probably filled with many other combustible things due to work being done. It does seem silly that a simple fire could do so much damage but huge amounts of damage can be done by someone with malicious intent.
2014-03-29 08:34:18 PM  
1 vote:
KITTERY, Maine: . . . They will make enough repairs so that the submarine can be towed to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Washington state

Hope they have a premium AAA account, because that's a long tow.
2014-03-29 08:34:03 PM  
1 vote:
You would think they would better screen these people.
2014-03-29 08:31:18 PM  
1 vote:
You would think a nuclear sub would have a better fire suppression system.
2014-03-29 08:31:06 PM  
1 vote:
<i>Seeking an excuse to leave work early, Casey James Fury set fire to a box of rags on a bunk, and the blaze quickly spread throughout the forward compartments. Fury pleaded guilty and is serving a 17-year sentence in federal prison.</i>

I don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?
2014-03-29 07:05:52 PM  
1 vote:
It will make fine metal for another empty Chinese tower.

/just watched VICE's report on America's scrapping economy
2014-03-29 05:07:54 PM  
1 vote:
Considering how many people are in the military, I'm actually kind of impressed this kind of thing doesn't happen more often.  Statistically speaking.
 
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