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(Yahoo)   RIP USS Miami, SSN-755, decommissioned today and headed off to the scrap yard. A boat that proudly served in three different conflicts was destroyed by a lazy shipyard worker who wanted to leave work early   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 156
    More: Sad, USS Miami, Miami, navies, Kittery, Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, boats, arsons  
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17969 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Mar 2014 at 8:26 PM (30 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-29 10:22:42 PM  
Another Nuke here.

/SSN 23
//SSBN 731
///SSN 783 AD MMCS
 
2014-03-29 10:22:46 PM  
Anyone remember the Midwest floods where an idiot broke the dike, flooding 1000's of acres because he wanted to party with a friend rather than go home to his girlfriend?
 
2014-03-29 10:29:43 PM  

the_celt: FTFA - Seeking an excuse to leave work early, Casey James Fury set fire to a box of rags on a bunk, and the blaze quickly spread throughout the forward compartments. Fury pleaded guilty and is serving a 17-year sentence in federal prison.

Does the Navy go after the costs incurred as a result of this?  Maybe take it out of his paycheck while working in prison?


He owes the Navy $400,000,000 in damages, per Wikipedia.
 
2014-03-29 10:29:44 PM  

Radioactive Ass: Dr Jack Badofsky: I have no idea, but wouldn't a job working on subs in a shipyard pay pretty decent?

That depends on the job. In this case a painter. They have a fairly low skill set and they don't need to know much more than what not to paint. I'm willing to bet that they are at the lowest end of the pay spectrum as far as shipyard workers go. Even the guy who sits in a corner pulling a lanyard at regular intervals (and they even have a flashing light telling them when to pull the lanyard) to flush the hydraulic system with steam probably gets paid more.


You're talking about a vessel that spends 95% of it's time completely submerged in corrosive salt water, short of the guys who work on the nuclear reactor, there is no job more critical than paint. This is true of any ship to be honest. He's probably one of the better paid guys working there.
 
2014-03-29 10:30:29 PM  
There's more to this story
He set two fires. One that did decent damage but was put out quickly and was concluded accidental
The second was days later and it was the big one that destroyed everything else
farkwad should never have been on that ship for the second fire
Someone in security let that slip in a really bad way
 
2014-03-29 10:38:18 PM  
Second time in as many greenlights that a yahoo news link is farked...
 
2014-03-29 10:41:35 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: And the defense contractors building the thing are happier than pigs in shiat because they're insured and get to build a new one.

Just a guess.


That's not how things work.
 
2014-03-29 10:42:10 PM  

TheGreatGazoo: You would think a nuclear sub would have a better fire suppression system.


It does, when it's running. It was shut down for overhaul.
 
2014-03-29 10:45:10 PM  

xrayspx: the_celt: FTFA - Seeking an excuse to leave work early, Casey James Fury set fire to a box of rags on a bunk, and the blaze quickly spread throughout the forward compartments. Fury pleaded guilty and is serving a 17-year sentence in federal prison.

Does the Navy go after the costs incurred as a result of this?  Maybe take it out of his paycheck while working in prison?

Yeah, IIRC he was fined $450MM.  It's totally symbolic of course.


Not totally. It remains as a judgement so in the event he ever comes in to money, the government gets to take it. That is the purpose of big judgments against people who don't have that kind of money. It isn't to "send a message" or something, it is as a backup. If they win the lottery, get an inheritance, etc, you get to have it. Basically it means they are going to be paying you their whole life, no matter what.
 
2014-03-29 10:46:12 PM  

powhound: WhackingDay: Gunboat: I am amazed at the number of nukes on fark.

/ssn 662 & 708

I was also briefly on the 710 (USS Boston). The joke was that 710 upside down and backwards spelled OIL, which is why the engines leaked so much.

ssn 642 (after she was turned into a special ops ride)  -- elt

Our joke was that the enemy could hear us coming from a thousand miles away.


I don't get the joke. =/
 
2014-03-29 10:51:22 PM  
That was one proud muther flucking boat!
 
2014-03-29 10:53:48 PM  

powhound: WhackingDay: Gunboat: I am amazed at the number of nukes on fark.

/ssn 662 & 708

I was also briefly on the 710 (USS Boston). The joke was that 710 upside down and backwards spelled OIL, which is why the engines leaked so much.

ssn 642 (after she was turned into a special ops ride)  -- elt

Our joke was that the enemy could hear us coming from a thousand miles away.


What do you mean by "turned into a Special Ops ride"?  What sorts of alterations are made?
 
2014-03-29 11:05:08 PM  

nullptr: powhound: WhackingDay: Gunboat: I am amazed at the number of nukes on fark.

/ssn 662 & 708

I was also briefly on the 710 (USS Boston). The joke was that 710 upside down and backwards spelled OIL, which is why the engines leaked so much.

ssn 642 (after she was turned into a special ops ride)  -- elt

Our joke was that the enemy could hear us coming from a thousand miles away.

I don't get the joke. =/


It wasn't really meant to be funny. I forgot to attach a "wry" face.

:/
 
2014-03-29 11:08:37 PM  

dukeblue219: Suppose that 10 years ago a Space Shuttle had been destroyed in similar fashion without loss of life (and before becoming a museum piece). Would you have been sad about that?


Nope.  It's just hardware.

Many of my friends sweated blood designing stealth hardware that was once shiat-hot cool and now rots in a desert boneyard.
 
2014-03-29 11:11:13 PM  

Dr Jack Badofsky: powhound: WhackingDay: Gunboat: I am amazed at the number of nukes on fark.

/ssn 662 & 708

I was also briefly on the 710 (USS Boston). The joke was that 710 upside down and backwards spelled OIL, which is why the engines leaked so much.

ssn 642 (after she was turned into a special ops ride)  -- elt

Our joke was that the enemy could hear us coming from a thousand miles away.

What do you mean by "turned into a Special Ops ride"?  What sorts of alterations are made?


They attached shelters to the missile deck. Divers and SEALS could access the shelters through missile tubes, hop into their zodiacs and do their thing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Kamehameha_(SSBN-642)

They converted one of the missile tubes into a farkin jacuzzi for the special ops guys. Actually, I never saw it. Could have been urban legend. But that was the word on the boat. Never really cared. Never needed to know for quals. That boat was a good duty station by the time I got to it. Stationed out of Pearl. One or two weeks max tooling around and then back into Pearl. One trip to Brisbane and back.
 
2014-03-29 11:11:23 PM  

Pribar: Bigjohn3592: I worked with a guy who was a Nuke tech or whatever they call it, in the Navy.  He was on a boomer sub.  Said the most scared he was going to die his whole time in the Navy was leaving the shipyards.  Hated the yard workers.  One guy welded clear through the control cable leading from the Con to the nuke.  Another was not following procedure carrying wrenches up the ladder, dropped it like 30 feet onto a crewman and fractured his skull. There were plenty more stories, from just one visit to the yards.

After that he was sure their first cruise out would be their last.

I lucked out on this being a Marine, but all the sailors I served with said that they ended up spending the first month or so out of the shipyards fixing the stuff the yardworkers farked up


Agent Nick Fury: DanInKansas: Man On Pink Corner: don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?

You.   You go read this right now. Your local library has a copy.

Short answer: naval warfare is horrifying.

Longer answer: You're less likely to die in combat as a sailor but if you do it's always in an incredibly painful way, like being shredded by a pressure wave, incinerated in a fire, cut in half by a bulkhead door slamming shut, etc., etc., etc.

Not to make this a gore fest but they called the A-7 the man-eater for a reason

Not just the A-7s out to get ya...


Ha. I was on a gun mount a few decks down when that happened. The flash really lit up the night. Poor guy really looked messed up the next night on the Bully!Big Stick Show.
 
2014-03-29 11:11:45 PM  
What a metaphor for our entire civilization.
 
2014-03-29 11:13:47 PM  

Radioactive Ass: powhound: ssn 642

I helped clean up their Otto Fuel spill back in the mid 80's when it was still stationed out of Holy Loch (they were pulling TMs off of all of the boats to relieve the crew and keep the cleanup going). What a mess that was, we ended up tearing apart the weapon stow locks and pulling up tracks and deck plates because it didn't just spill, it sprayed all over the place and went into every single nook and cranny. That was fun. It took them about 30 days working 24/7 to get the readings back to normal and the stows put back together and weight tested then getting their weapons back on board. Sucking rubber for 12 hours isn't all that much fun, especially when it was on your off duty day.


Yikes. That was a decade before my time. Nasty business for you there.
 
2014-03-29 11:17:09 PM  

ReapTheChaos: You're talking about a vessel that spends 95% of it's time completely submerged in corrosive salt water, short of the guys who work on the nuclear reactor, there is no job more critical than paint. This is true of any ship to be honest. He's probably one of the better paid guys working there.


Uh. No. The hull gets painted maybe every 5 years or so, drydocks are expensive. Topside more often, maybe once a year. Inside paint is not really all that important in the grand scheme of things. I've watched a shipyard painter spend an hour smearing paint over the same few square feet of interior bulkhead while staring off into space. There are a couple of important places that get painted (mainly inside tanks and some of the bilges) but 99% of it is cosmetic. In the 8+ years I spent on boats we spent maybe a grand total of 2 weeks painting the exterior above the waterline. The interior is also rarely painted (paint is an atmospheric contaminant and it's very unusual to even carry any on board, not even touch up paint).

Keep in mind that on the surface most of the boat is underwater and much of what you see is not pressure hull but superstructure (free flooding spaces). When submerged corrosion is almost non-existent because of the extensive use of zincs both inside and out. Surface ships are not submarines. they use different grades of steel and take a beating that submarines just simply aren't usually exposed to.

By far the most painting I did was while I was on shore duty (museum ship) and 99% of that was fixing what the shipyard did wrong (Mare Island). Shipyard painters are, in general, crappy workers and they don't get paid anywhere near what the more skilled workers get paid.
 
2014-03-29 11:31:34 PM  

Dr Jack Badofsky: What do you mean by "turned into a Special Ops ride"? What sorts of alterations are made?


Missile tubes get decommissioned and turned into storage for special operations gear, extra food and lockout chambers. Extra berthing is placed where missile launch gear used to be (or is now useable because the warheads are no longer shooting zoomies into the missile compartment upper level). A DDS (Dry Deck Shelter) is attached just behind the sail (or at least the attaching points are installed). Stuff like that. Once you get rid of the missiles you end up with a farkton of extra space and weight to play with.

MCC alone could probably sleep 50 men and a lot of crew berthing would open up after you got rid of the MT's and FTB's. I once went out on Alpha sea trials in a non-special ops boomer and we had almost 150 extra men on board just to do systems testing at sea. You would be surprised how many people you can fit inside a boat when you want to and don't have to worry about nuclear weapons security or radiation from warheads. Granted it was cramped but the missile launching equipment was in place so that took up a lot of space.
 
2014-03-29 11:43:46 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Seeking an excuse to leave work early, Casey James Fury set fire to a box of rags on a bunk, and the blaze quickly spread throughout the forward compartments. Fury pleaded guilty and is serving a 17-year sentence in federal prison.

Do people not know how to fake a headache anymore?


Besides your wife?

/Sorry.... too easy...
 
2014-03-29 11:48:04 PM  

powhound: Yikes. That was a decade before my time. Nasty business for you there.


It didn't help that the cause of the spill was a faulty relief valve on a fuel tank and instead of defueling it in the room they left the fuel in... and as soon as they started to unship the weapon the faulty valve let go again and rained fuel from the escape trunk down into and onto everything.

But to be fair that was Squadron 14's fault, they wanted to get the boat back out to sea and didn't want to take the extra few hours that it would have taken to get some 5 gallon cans, a roller pump and tygon tubing together and down the hatch. That mistake easily added 2 weeks to the clean up.
 
2014-03-29 11:54:28 PM  

Ambivalence: Considering how many people are in the military, I'm actually kind of impressed this kind of thing doesn't happen more often.  Statistically speaking.


Being a couple hundred feet under water might discourage that sort of thing.
 
2014-03-30 12:04:48 AM  

stuffy: Being a couple hundred feet under water might discourage that sort of thing.


Not to mention the several thousands of feet of water below...
 
2014-03-30 12:09:45 AM  

Dr Jack Badofsky: What do you mean by "turned into a Special Ops ride"?  What sorts of alterations are made?


You know, silencers on the propellers, painted some fish on the hull so it would just look like a school of fish swimming by, high tech stuff.
 
2014-03-30 12:16:24 AM  
If you go to the wikipedia page for the Miami, at the bottom there are links to the declassified command histories for 1990-2002.  Being bored, I read the ones for 1998 and 1999 (when they launched a bunch of missiles into Iraq and Serbia).  In the 1999 command history, it indicates that the boat received a "Meritorious Unit Commendation...for performance during deployed operations in 1997."  I went to see what that was all about, but saw that the 1996 and 1997 command histories appear not to have been declassified yet.  Any guesses what they were up to?  I'm guessing it wasn't just tiger cruises and sonar exercises in the Bahamas.
 
2014-03-30 12:37:47 AM  
Nice to see so many Nukes out there. Was a Nuke.

/SSN 675
//worked on ( as a test director) SSN 757, 760, 761, 762, 763, 700, SSBN 741
///2 types of ships in the Navy, subs and targets.
 
2014-03-30 12:53:34 AM  

MechaPyx: He sought an excuse to leave work early. Now he has 17 years to think about how nice a regular job would be.

I mean, I just pretend I'm "sick" I kinda want the place to be there when I feel "well" enough to come back.
I thought this was how it was done.

 
2014-03-30 01:05:45 AM  
I hope Fury is going to be playing hide the torpedo for at least 10 years .. that was my tax money he blew. Along with the bears and bulls in Cellblock D
 
2014-03-30 01:21:08 AM  
Thanks for allowing the periscope depth view of the `not target' contingent of the USN, swabbos (sorry, reflex call from former cannon fodder).

/Jules farking Fermi Verne
//reminds me of an old shop
i30.photobucket.com
 
2014-03-30 01:28:21 AM  

trappedspirit: Dr Jack Badofsky: What do you mean by "turned into a Special Ops ride"?  What sorts of alterations are made?

You know, silencers on the propellers, painted some fish on the hull so it would just look like a school of fish swimming by, high tech stuff.


They put it through shiatloads of rigorous training and paint it black.  But, it's allowed to grow a beard in theater and sleep all day, so totally worth it.
 
2014-03-30 01:34:47 AM  

BalugaJoe: You would think they would better screen these people.


E. Snowden might just agree.
 
2014-03-30 02:13:32 AM  

Radioactive Ass: puffy999: Is there no where else to fix the vessel or to cut it up?

If floating it saves so much money by taking a relatively long route from the Snake River down the Colombia and all the way around Juan De Fuca, why not fix it sooner and utilize the Mississippi/Missouri/Ohio Rivers as well?

Puget Sound is the only place equipped to remove the reactor from a boat because it's the closest Naval facility to the normal resting place for reactors. Every single nuclear powered boat or ship that's been decommissioned (save one, which is a museum ship) has gone there. If it's going to Idaho it's possible that they plan on setting up the reactor compartment for training. At one time there was a reactor built there specifically to train new reactor operators and the people operating the rest of the engineering plant (steam, cooling water, lube oil and so on) before they went to the fleet. I only say this because the usual fate of submarine reactors is in a big pit over in Hanford WA. In those cases Puget Sound removes the fuel, cuts out the entire reactor compartment, caps off both ends with a couple of inches of steel then barges it off for a trip up the Columbia. When it gets to Hanford it's taken off of the barge and s.l.o.w.l.y. moved inland to a huge pit where, last time I heard, there are over 100 other similarly prepared reactor compartments. When that pit is filled it will be capped off and left alone for some 600 years. The rest of the boat is salvaged for parts that can be refurbished and reused elsewhere in the navy and then the rest is sold for scrap.

As to fixing it the cost to do that was higher than the cost of a new boat. A submarine fire in the shipyard isn't quite as bad as one at sea. In the shipyard there are open hatches for the heat to get out as well as hull cuts (used to remove large pieces of gear that can't fit through a hatch). That being said there is much more damage than possible heat damage to the hull. Smoke carries acids that coat electron ...


Given that subs, like modern surface ships, are built in sectional stages for assembly and testing efficiency, going through and verifying/reworking/replacing all the fittings, valves, cabling etc in the final installed locations as a whole ship would be incredibly slow, difficult and very costly.  There's a reason we cut man-sized doorways in the hull just above the forward sonar bulb just to work on transducer supports, and it's not cause the shipyard workers are lazy and don't want to haul equipment down multiple decks through 18"-wide hatches (which is also still true).  If you're working on various multiple-compartment equipment throughout the entire damn boat, and can't be going and turning the thing into swiss cheese for access, then that's a hell of a job to do.
 
2014-03-30 03:25:31 AM  
It is amazing that a single, negligent act could cause 400 million in damages. Obviously certain people in power could (and have) caused that sort of damage. But a single act by a single shipyard worker...that's a staggering amount of money.
 
2014-03-30 04:04:34 AM  
At the end of the ceremony, the crew filed out of the auditorium after its top enlisted sailor, Chief Tyrus Rock, led them in a cheer, shouting out the first part of the ship's motto, "No free rides!" The crew finished by responding, "Everybody rows!"

This is some Starship Troopers shiat right here
 
2014-03-30 07:55:33 AM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: And the defense contractors building the thing are happier than pigs in shiat because they're insured and get to build a new one.


And the insurance company is happy because they already sold the coverage in bulk to another insurance company...
 
2014-03-30 09:27:53 AM  

Dr Jack Badofsky: Pretty messed up when someone thinks "You know, I really don't feel like working on this nuclear sub today. I think I'll set it on fire instead."


I was gonna work on the sub, but then I got high
I was going to weld and paint and scrub, but then I got high
Now I'm stuck in Fed Club, and I know why
Because I got high, because I got high, because I got high

Disclaimer: No evidence exists that the dumbass wanted to get high, but now you have the song stuck in your head.
 
2014-03-30 09:28:23 AM  

dukeblue219: vincentfox: Big machine damaged & scrapped, why this is SAD eludes me.

Because it's a billion dollar machine built at taxpayers' expense and completely destroyed by an intentionally-set fire.

Suppose that 10 years ago a Space Shuttle had been destroyed in similar fashion without loss of life (and before becoming a museum piece). Would you have been sad about that?


Sub's are designed to kill people.
 
2014-03-30 09:36:31 AM  

StoPPeRmobile: Sub's are designed to kill people.


Maybe more directly, but a significant chunk of the Space Shuttle's missions are military in focus.  They aren't just watching spiders make webs in microgravity.
 
2014-03-30 09:38:01 AM  
17 years prison..... a white collar criminal could steal that by ripping off seniors and get probation, but a working stiff (albeit a stupid one) gets 17 years hahahah.  Not saying he shoudn't, just pointing out the hypocracy
 
2014-03-30 09:39:29 AM  

Your_Huckleberry: Pribar:

Not just the A-7s out to get ya...

Ha. I was on a gun mount a few decks down when that happened. The flash really lit up the night. Poor guy really looked messed up the next night on the Bully!Big Stick Show.


Guy I worked with at the time insisted that the interview afterward was staged.  "He got sucked in and then a bunch of shiat blew out the back!  They dressed some guy up in bandages and to make it look like he survived!"

Couldn't quite make him understand that the engine isn't RIGHT THERE at the air intake, it's much further back in the airframe, and that an engine getting fuel and air that suddenly stops getting air is going to dump a lot of hot unburned fuel out, which tends to autoignite when it hits atmosphere...
 
2014-03-30 10:29:34 AM  

puffy999: Is there no where else to fix the vessel or to cut it up?



Hello, Barack? This is Li Kequiang. Free pick up on your scrap sub. Promise to cut it up real good.
 
2014-03-30 11:11:58 AM  

Radioactive Ass: puffy999: Is there no where else to fix the vessel or to cut it up?

If floating it saves so much money by taking a relatively long route from the Snake River down the Colombia and all the way around Juan De Fuca, why not fix it sooner and utilize the Mississippi/Missouri/Ohio Rivers as well?

Puget Sound is the only place equipped to remove the reactor from a boat because it's the closest Naval facility to the normal resting place for reactors. Every single nuclear powered boat or ship that's been decommissioned (save one, which is a museum ship) has gone there. If it's going to Idaho it's possible that they plan on setting up the reactor compartment for training. At one time there was a reactor built there specifically to train new reactor operators and the people operating the rest of the engineering plant (steam, cooling water, lube oil and so on) before they went to the fleet. I only say this because the usual fate of submarine reactors is in a big pit over in Hanford WA. In those cases Puget Sound removes the fuel, cuts out the entire reactor compartment, caps off both ends with a couple of inches of steel then barges it off for a trip up the Columbia. When it gets to Hanford it's taken off of the barge and s.l.o.w.l.y. moved inland to a huge pit where, last time I heard, there are over 100 other similarly prepared reactor compartments. When that pit is filled it will be capped off and left alone for some 600 years. The rest of the boat is salvaged for parts that can be refurbished and reused elsewhere in the navy and then the rest is sold for scrap.

As to fixing it the cost to do that was higher than the cost of a new boat. A submarine fire in the shipyard isn't quite as bad as one at sea. In the shipyard there are open hatches for the heat to get out as well as hull cuts (used to remove large pieces of gear that can't fit through a hatch). That being said there is much more damage than possible heat damage to the hull. Smoke carries acids that coat electron ...


Came here to say the same thing but the Hanford Site is decommissioned for the most part and quite a big mess.  Looks like the spent fuel will be going to the Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanford_Site
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_Reactor_Facility
 
2014-03-30 12:42:44 PM  

Mister Peejay: Dr Jack Badofsky: Pretty messed up when someone thinks "You know, I really don't feel like working on this nuclear sub today. I think I'll set it on fire instead."

I was gonna work on the sub, but then I got high
I was going to weld and paint and scrub, but then I got high
Now I'm stuck in Fed Club, and I know why
Because I got high, because I got high, because I got high

Disclaimer: No evidence exists that the dumbass wanted to get high, but now you have the song stuck in your head.


You dick.
 
2014-03-30 01:00:49 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: And the defense contractors building the thing are happier than pigs in shiat because they're insured and get to build a new one.

Just a guess.


Actually it had no impact on whether or not new ones are built. The Navy just started building two VA class boats a year after a long and drawn out procurement process. The wheels don't turn fast enough for them to say "just throw another one on the bill" to replace Miami. Also, because of the cost involved the Navy self-insures boats under construction/maintenance.

Truth be told, my company spent quite a few hours working on Miami as part of the team that was trying to determine if she could be fixed. The decision to scrap cost us a lot of man-hours. If it had happened a few years earlier then there's a chance she could have been designated to become a new reactor training ship, but by the time of the fire hit two hulls (already decommed 688s) had been chosen.
 
2014-03-30 01:05:05 PM  

indy_kid: ecmoRandomNumbers: And the defense contractors building the thing are happier than pigs in shiat because they're insured and get to build a new one.

Just a guess.

No more LA-class boats anymore.  They're now Seawolf-class Fast Attacks.  Won't build more until the oldest LA-class reach end-of-service, and it may be more economical to just replace the nuke fuel, given the current state of foreign boats in service.


Seawolf is also no longer being built. Currently, the Virginia class is being built, just fast enough to keep the sub builders in business. They retire the LA class at about the same rate, to keep a constant number of boats.
 
2014-03-30 01:24:49 PM  

indy_kid: Bigjohn3592: I worked with a guy who was a Nuke tech or whatever they call it, in the Navy.  He was on a boomer sub.  Said the most scared he was going to die his whole time in the Navy was leaving the shipyards.  Hated the yard workers.  One guy welded clear through the control cable leading from the Con to the nuke.  Another was not following procedure carrying wrenches up the ladder, dropped it like 30 feet onto a crewman and fractured his skull. There were plenty more stories, from just one visit to the yards.

Someone wanted vents on the condensers of our AC units, so some idiot yard worker machined steel plugs with copper tubing, and a brass valve at the end.  About a month out of the yard, one of those plugs blew out; the corrosion caused by the dissimilar metals (steel and the brass tank of the condenser) ate most of the threads.  A 50-PSI stream of water sprayed into a $10K electric motor, destroying it.

I was first on scene and stopped the flooding after a few moments; just had to reach behind me to shut off the motor supplying cooling water to the condenser, then close some butterfly isolation valves.  To swap out the motor, we had to cut through 2 decks, then replace the flooring over each after the cutouts were welding back into place.   Fortunately, we had the evidence, so the shipyard ended up paying for the repairs.

The really scary part was all this 50-PSI seawater spraying around the room and onto our Auxiliary Electrical Distribution Panel.  It was carrying about 900KW at the time.  If the water had contacted anything energized on the Board, I would have been killed instantly (standing in 2-3" of saltwater), and responders would have walked into a really bad scene.


Wow. A very hearty thanks for your service.
 
2014-03-30 01:27:18 PM  

Gunboat: I am amazed at the number of nukes on fark.

/ssn 662 & 708


Forward ET on 706, when it was stationed in Groton
 
2014-03-30 04:07:31 PM  
TheGoatsDad: ..when it was stationed in Groton

My condolences.
 
2014-03-30 05:19:42 PM  

whyaduck: TheGoatsDad: ..when it was stationed in Groton

My condolences.


Thank you, it wasn't the most interesting base
 
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