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(Yahoo)   RIP USS Miami, SSN-755, decommissioned today and headed off to the scrap yard. A boat that proudly served in three different conflicts was destroyed by a lazy shipyard worker who wanted to leave work early   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 156
    More: Sad, USS Miami, Miami, navies, Kittery, Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, boats, arsons  
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17975 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Mar 2014 at 8:26 PM (34 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-03-29 04:35:46 PM  
It took 12 hours and the efforts of more than 100 firefighters to save the vessel.

"Save"?

I wish they could cut up the worker and sell off the parts for salvage value.
 
2014-03-29 05:05:45 PM  
FTFA - Seeking an excuse to leave work early, Casey James Fury set fire to a box of rags on a bunk, and the blaze quickly spread throughout the forward compartments. Fury pleaded guilty and is serving a 17-year sentence in federal prison.

Does the Navy go after the costs incurred as a result of this?  Maybe take it out of his paycheck while working in prison?
 
2014-03-29 05:07:54 PM  
Considering how many people are in the military, I'm actually kind of impressed this kind of thing doesn't happen more often.  Statistically speaking.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-03-29 05:11:22 PM  
He was ordered to pay $400 million restitution. If you work a regular job only part of your paycheck can be seized to pay debts. Prison might be different.
 
2014-03-29 05:34:50 PM  
www.ibiblio.org
They said the reactor will be taken to Idaho.  Will that require them to pass through...Montana?
 
2014-03-29 06:04:14 PM  
And the defense contractors building the thing are happier than pigs in shiat because they're insured and get to build a new one.

Just a guess.
 
2014-03-29 07:05:52 PM  
It will make fine metal for another empty Chinese tower.

/just watched VICE's report on America's scrapping economy
 
2014-03-29 08:31:05 PM  
A ship is made out of metal.  Just common metal.

The crew is what makes a ship great.
 
2014-03-29 08:31:06 PM  
<i>Seeking an excuse to leave work early, Casey James Fury set fire to a box of rags on a bunk, and the blaze quickly spread throughout the forward compartments. Fury pleaded guilty and is serving a 17-year sentence in federal prison.</i>

I don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?
 
2014-03-29 08:31:18 PM  
You would think a nuclear sub would have a better fire suppression system.
 
2014-03-29 08:34:03 PM  
You would think they would better screen these people.
 
2014-03-29 08:34:12 PM  

TheGreatGazoo: You would think a nuclear sub would have a better fire suppression system.


It was off due to the work being done
 
2014-03-29 08:34:18 PM  
KITTERY, Maine: . . . They will make enough repairs so that the submarine can be towed to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Washington state

Hope they have a premium AAA account, because that's a long tow.
 
2014-03-29 08:35:58 PM  

Man On Pink Corner: <i>Seeking an excuse to leave work early, Casey James Fury set fire to a box of rags on a bunk, and the blaze quickly spread throughout the forward compartments. Fury pleaded guilty and is serving a 17-year sentence in federal prison.</i>

I don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?


It was in the shipyard, so not only was its own fire-supression system turned off, there was tons of flammable material that wouldn't otherwise be there scattered around.
 
2014-03-29 08:37:15 PM  

Man On Pink Corner: don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?


You.   You go read this right now. Your local library has a copy.

Short answer: naval warfare is horrifying.

Longer answer: You're less likely to die in combat as a sailor but if you do it's always in an incredibly painful way, like being shredded by a pressure wave, incinerated in a fire, cut in half by a bulkhead door slamming shut, etc., etc., etc.
 
2014-03-29 08:38:00 PM  
He sought an excuse to leave work early. Now he has 17 years to think about how nice a regular job would be.
 
2014-03-29 08:38:01 PM  

Uzzah: KITTERY, Maine: . . . They will make enough repairs so that the submarine can be towed to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Washington state

Hope they have a premium AAA account, because that's a long tow.


I have a sweet 21ft Crownline and a nice ski rope. I'll pull that biatch if the price is right.
 
2014-03-29 08:39:01 PM  

Man On Pink Corner: <i>Seeking an excuse to leave work early, Casey James Fury set fire to a box of rags on a bunk, and the blaze quickly spread throughout the forward compartments. Fury pleaded guilty and is serving a 17-year sentence in federal prison.</i>

I don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?


In such a contained space and considering hte materials inside, the fire gets extremely hot very fast. like melty hot.
 
2014-03-29 08:43:40 PM  

Uzzah: KITTERY, Maine: . . . They will make enough repairs so that the submarine can be towed to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Washington state

Hope they have a premium AAA account, because that's a long tow.


They're going through Montana.
 
2014-03-29 08:43:51 PM  
Is there no where else to fix the vessel or to cut it up?

If floating it saves so much money by taking a relatively long route from the Snake River down the Colombia and all the way around Juan De Fuca, why not fix it sooner and utilize the Mississippi/Missouri/Ohio Rivers as well?
 
2014-03-29 08:44:02 PM  

Man On Pink Corner: <i>Seeking an excuse to leave work early, Casey James Fury set fire to a box of rags on a bunk, and the blaze quickly spread throughout the forward compartments. Fury pleaded guilty and is serving a 17-year sentence in federal prison.</i>

I don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?


Ships are at their most vulnerable when not manned and in port. The automatic suppression system was turned off....which seems very silly to have the entire system turned off....the decks were probably filled with many other combustible things due to work being done. It does seem silly that a simple fire could do so much damage but huge amounts of damage can be done by someone with malicious intent.
 
2014-03-29 08:44:29 PM  

NightOwl2255: TheGreatGazoo: You would think a nuclear sub would have a better fire suppression system.

It was off due to the work being done


Had this discussion back when it happened. The primary fire suppression system is the 300 or so submariners crowding the submarine.
 
2014-03-29 08:45:16 PM  

puffy999: Is there no where else to fix the vessel or to cut it up?

If floating it saves so much money by taking a relatively long route from the Snake River down the Colombia and all the way around Juan De Fuca, why not fix it sooner and utilize the Mississippi/Missouri/Ohio Rivers as well?


It's HY80, due to the fire, it's been tempered in the wrong way.  There's no fixing that hull.
 
2014-03-29 08:45:43 PM  

Massively Multiplayer Addict: Man On Pink Corner: <i>Seeking an excuse to leave work early, Casey James Fury set fire to a box of rags on a bunk, and the blaze quickly spread throughout the forward compartments. Fury pleaded guilty and is serving a 17-year sentence in federal prison.</i>

I don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?

In such a contained space and considering hte materials inside, the fire gets extremely hot very fast. like melty hot.


This, it basically becomes a blast furnace,
 
2014-03-29 08:45:46 PM  
Now that dumbass worker isn't going to go home for years, if ever at all (come on you guys with shanks. Don't fail us now).
 
2014-03-29 08:46:10 PM  

Man On Pink Corner: <i>Seeking an excuse to leave work early, Casey James Fury set fire to a box of rags on a bunk, and the blaze quickly spread throughout the forward compartments. Fury pleaded guilty and is serving a 17-year sentence in federal prison.</i>

I don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?


More blood for the blood god.  The military over pays for everything and everyone gets their palms greased on the side.  Nam was nothing more than a made up scenario to go to war to sell US new hardware.
 
2014-03-29 08:46:20 PM  

DanInKansas: Man On Pink Corner: don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?

You.   You go read this right now. Your local library has a copy.

Short answer: naval warfare is horrifying.

Longer answer: You're less likely to die in combat as a sailor but if you do it's always in an incredibly painful way, like being shredded by a pressure wave, incinerated in a fire, cut in half by a bulkhead door slamming shut, etc., etc., etc.


Well actually only one of those is probably painful in any meaningful way. The 1st and 3rd leave a godawful mess for whoever cleans up after you, particularly the first one, but you'd be unlikely to feel a thing.

Doesn't make it any less horrible of course.

...and fark this guy who burnt up that boat. Arson to get off work early? I'm usually against really lengthy setences since people lose perspective on just how long 5-10-20 years is but this guy... 17 doesn't seem like enough.
 
2014-03-29 08:47:21 PM  

ZAZ: It took 12 hours and the efforts of more than 100 firefighters to save the vessel.

"Save"?

I wish they could cut up the worker and sell off the parts for salvage value.


Dibs on his liver.
 
2014-03-29 08:47:22 PM  

rohar: It's HY80, due to the fire, it's been tempered in the wrong way. There's no fixing that hull.


The context of the rest of my comment is somewhat important. They're going to float this thing per the article, so that is what I meant by "fix."
 
2014-03-29 08:48:53 PM  

subfactorial: DanInKansas: Man On Pink Corner: don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?

You.   You go read this right now. Your local library has a copy.

Short answer: naval warfare is horrifying.

Longer answer: You're less likely to die in combat as a sailor but if you do it's always in an incredibly painful way, like being shredded by a pressure wave, incinerated in a fire, cut in half by a bulkhead door slamming shut, etc., etc., etc.

Well actually only one of those is probably painful in any meaningful way. The 1st and 3rd leave a godawful mess for whoever cleans up after you, particularly the first one, but you'd be unlikely to feel a thing.

Doesn't make it any less horrible of course.

...and fark this guy who burnt up that boat. Arson to get off work early? I'm usually against really lengthy setences since people lose perspective on just how long 5-10-20 years is but this guy... 17 doesn't seem like enough.


Man On Pink Corner forgot about being eviscerated by a leak in a high pressure pipe.  Just walking along and there's a microscopic leak in a 5000lb pipe.  You can't even see it.  Then the top half of your body leaves the bottom half. 

Being a submariner, good times.
 
2014-03-29 08:50:04 PM  

puffy999: rohar: It's HY80, due to the fire, it's been tempered in the wrong way. There's no fixing that hull.

The context of the rest of my comment is somewhat important. They're going to float this thing per the article, so that is what I meant by "fix."


Because I'm not sure you can get something the size of a nuclear submarine up the Missouri River that far.  And I don't even know if they've linked the Columbia River to the Mississippi River system with canals or not.  I don't think they have.
 
2014-03-29 08:50:22 PM  

Man On Pink Corner: <i>Seeking an excuse to leave work early, Casey James Fury set fire to a box of rags on a bunk, and the blaze quickly spread throughout the forward compartments. Fury pleaded guilty and is serving a 17-year sentence in federal prison.</i>

I don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?


Paint burns, wires burn, chairs and bedding and curtains (every bunk has one) burn.  Papers, they burn too.  Computers burn. There's a ton of stuff in every ship that can burn.  Do you think these are sterile stainless steel operating room (stuff in there that can burn too) vessels where everyone walks, sleeps, and lives on bare stainless steel?  In the case of an actual war, there are repair lockers manned by people like myself that are trained to not only do my regular job (avionics in my case), but also to fight fires, seal ruptures in pipes, contain flooding, defend your right to be stupid, many other jobs.
 
2014-03-29 08:51:04 PM  
Big machine damaged & scrapped, why this is SAD eludes me.
 
2014-03-29 08:52:05 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: And the defense contractors building the thing are happier than pigs in shiat because they're insured and get to build a new one.

Just a guess.


It wasn't being built, it was undergoing maintenance.  The insurance companies are on the hook and the contractor may have his rates go up after a hit like that.  The navy is out a ship that still had useful life and the replacements are more capable but will be in fewer numbers and not in service for years.  No one is happy about that loss for such a stupid reason.
 
2014-03-29 08:53:16 PM  

the_celt: FTFA - Seeking an excuse to leave work early, Casey James Fury set fire to a box of rags on a bunk, and the blaze quickly spread throughout the forward compartments. Fury pleaded guilty and is serving a 17-year sentence in federal prison.

Does the Navy go after the costs incurred as a result of this?  Maybe take it out of his paycheck while working in prison?


Yeah, IIRC he was fined $450MM.  It's totally symbolic of course.
 
2014-03-29 08:54:10 PM  
Holy shiat, dude. Treason much?
 
2014-03-29 08:54:32 PM  

Massively Multiplayer Addict: In such a contained space and considering hte materials inside, the fire gets extremely hot very fast. like melty hot.


Sort of like this?

scienceblogs.com
 
2014-03-29 08:55:50 PM  

NEDM: Because I'm not sure you can get something the size of a nuclear submarine up the Missouri River that far. And I don't even know if they've linked the Columbia River to the Mississippi River system with canals or not. I don't think they have.


I'm not suggesting the whole distance, obviously. However, if towing that far would save so much money relative to the MUCH shorter driving distance between Boise (? I don't know where that facility is) and Bremerton, other river systems could be utilized to some degree. Even shipping to Pittsburgh and towing to some location on the Mississippi should then be somewhat cost effective, IF indeed it could be fixed to such a degree on the east coast.
 
2014-03-29 08:56:28 PM  

NEDM: puffy999: rohar: It's HY80, due to the fire, it's been tempered in the wrong way. There's no fixing that hull.

The context of the rest of my comment is somewhat important. They're going to float this thing per the article, so that is what I meant by "fix."

Because I'm not sure you can get something the size of a nuclear submarine up the Missouri River that far.  And I don't even know if they've linked the Columbia River to the Mississippi River system with canals or not.  I don't think they have.


From the Wiki (I know, not the most reliable) the draft is 30ft, so you're not going up the Missouri. They try to keep the channel at a minimum of 9.

I guess you -could- put it on a barge, but then your second part comes into play...there is no link between the Missouri and the Columbia. You can't even navigate up the Missouri with barges much farther than Omaha before you start running into large dams with no locks.
 
2014-03-29 08:56:50 PM  
Crazy guy like the guy at Norfolk.
 
2014-03-29 08:58:48 PM  

BalugaJoe: You would think they would better screen these people.


more dumb asses work at the shipyards than any where else
 
2014-03-29 08:59:06 PM  

DanInKansas: Man On Pink Corner: don't understand how something made almost entirely of metal is so easily destroyed by fire.  WTF happens when this thing gets into an actual war?

You.   You go read this right now. Your local library has a copy.

Short answer: naval warfare is horrifying.

Longer answer: You're less likely to die in combat as a sailor but if you do it's always in an incredibly painful way, like being shredded by a pressure wave, incinerated in a fire, cut in half by a bulkhead door slamming shut, etc., etc., etc.


Not to make this a gore fest but they called the A-7 the man-eater for a reason
 
2014-03-29 08:59:32 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: And the defense contractors building the thing are happier than pigs in shiat because they're insured and get to build a new one.

Just a guess.


The big contractors self-insure.
 
2014-03-29 08:59:56 PM  
Basically, why even bother floating and towing it if they are going to ship the thing all the way to Idaho, unless that's literally the only place that can handle the sub?
 
2014-03-29 09:00:15 PM  

puffy999: NEDM: Because I'm not sure you can get something the size of a nuclear submarine up the Missouri River that far. And I don't even know if they've linked the Columbia River to the Mississippi River system with canals or not. I don't think they have.

I'm not suggesting the whole distance, obviously. However, if towing that far would save so much money relative to the MUCH shorter driving distance between Boise (? I don't know where that facility is) and Bremerton, other river systems could be utilized to some degree. Even shipping to Pittsburgh and towing to some location on the Mississippi should then be somewhat cost effective, IF indeed it could be fixed to such a degree on the east coast.


It is much MUCH cheaper to hire a tug to tow the hulk from Maine to Washington than it would to try and lift a 5750 ton submarine out of the water and try and truck it over the Rocky Mountains.  In fact, I don't know if there is even a truck that can carry something that big in the US.  If there is, its daily rate is much MUCH MUCH more than the rate for a single ocean-going tug.
 
2014-03-29 09:01:05 PM  

vincentfox: Big machine damaged & scrapped, why this is SAD eludes me.


Because it's a billion dollar machine built at taxpayers' expense and completely destroyed by an intentionally-set fire.

Suppose that 10 years ago a Space Shuttle had been destroyed in similar fashion without loss of life (and before becoming a museum piece). Would you have been sad about that?
 
2014-03-29 09:02:05 PM  

puffy999: Basically, why even bother floating and towing it if they are going to ship the thing all the way to Idaho, unless that's literally the only place that can handle the sub?


Let me guess, you have no idea what happens in the sub fleet in Idaho?
 
2014-03-29 09:02:16 PM  

puffy999: Basically, why even bother floating and towing it if they are going to ship the thing all the way to Idaho, unless that's literally the only place that can handle the sub?


The sub is not going to Idaho.  That is where the reactor fuel is going.  The sub itself is going to Puget Sound.

The reactor fuel has already been removed.  That's what they just spent 50 million dollars doing.
 
2014-03-29 09:04:36 PM  

puffy999: Basically, why even bother floating and towing it if they are going to ship the thing all the way to Idaho, unless that's literally the only place that can handle the sub?


Remember the sub has the whole nuclear reactor thing too. I'm guessing finding a ship yard that has security clearances and the ability to decommission vessels with nuclear reactors is just a touch harder than finding one that will cut apart an old barge.
 
2014-03-29 09:05:11 PM  

puffy999: Basically, why even bother floating and towing it if they are going to ship the thing all the way to Idaho, unless that's literally the only place that can handle the sub?


The sub isn't going to Idaho, only the nuclear bits are going there, and they can fit on trucks or train cars. The remainder of the sub will be towed to Washington, and scrapped there. Does that make more sense?
 
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