If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Consumerist)   Do you keep your bread in the fridge? You're doing it wrong   (consumerist.com) divider line 141
    More: Obvious, America's Test Kitchen, food packaging, spoilage  
•       •       •

11932 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Mar 2014 at 4:15 PM (38 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



141 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-03-29 04:17:07 PM  
No, freezer.
 
2014-03-29 04:19:11 PM  
Ugh, I see the same advice all the time. The fact is I keep my 100% whole wheat bread in the refrigerator. If I don't it will mould within a couple days. Even after many weeks it does not taste stale in the slightest. It literally takes at least a month before it even starts to get stale. I don't see the problem with the refrigerator.
 
2014-03-29 04:19:56 PM  
EGGS:
Where to store:
 In the refrigerator, obviously, but more precisely...
Where exactly: In the back of the fridge- not in the door, even if your fridge has one of those egg-holder things. "Those holders are in a horrible location, because eggs need to be stored as cold as possible and that door is the warmest place," notes Davison. "So take that thing out, it's usually removable, and store them in the back of the fridge."


Depends...  I keep my fridge really cold.  If I put eggs way in the back, the ones closest to the back wall can actually freeze and crack open.  The door is perfect for them.
 
2014-03-29 04:21:14 PM  
Always keep bread in fridge. You live in Florida or the south...your bread turns green very quickly if left out

Freezing bread is hard to seperate...and hard to defrost. Dumb idea
 
2014-03-29 04:21:38 PM  

DrunkWithImpotence: Depends...  I keep my fridge really cold.  If I put eggs way in the back, the ones closest to the back wall can actually freeze and crack open.  The door is perfect for them.


Same here.
 
2014-03-29 04:22:48 PM  
A few years ago when I was on vacation in New Zealand I noticed that the bread wrapper said to store it in the refrigerator. After I started to do that I didn't have nearly the problem with mold as I did before. Maybe it was the humidity down there.
 
2014-03-29 04:23:28 PM  

vodka: Ugh, I see the same advice all the time. The fact is I keep my 100% whole wheat bread in the refrigerator. If I don't it will mould within a couple days. Even after many weeks it does not taste stale in the slightest. It literally takes at least a month before it even starts to get stale. I don't see the problem with the refrigerator.


Yeah, some breads, not all, but some just get moldy almost instantly when not refrigerated, which is why the local Trader Joe's tells me not all TJ bread is available at all stores. Too much molds too quickly in shipping, the "sprouted" kinds especially.
 
2014-03-29 04:23:33 PM  
EGGS:

No.  Not here in Germany.  On the kitchen counter for a day or two prior to baking/cooking and such.   This freak me out when I married my old girl.
 
2014-03-29 04:24:06 PM  
I refrigerate my bread and haven't had any issues, though I usually toast it, so I don't know if that makes a difference.
 
2014-03-29 04:24:19 PM  

FloridaFarkTag: Always keep bread in fridge. You live in Florida or the south...your bread turns green very quickly if left out

Freezing bread is hard to seperate...and hard to defrost. Dumb idea


Depends how fast you eat bread.  We always kept it in the freezer growing up.  Don't get shiatty soft white bread and there is usually no problems separating the slices.
 
2014-03-29 04:24:27 PM  
If moisture is the rationale for not putting bread in the fridge then doesn't the relative humidity in the kitchen vs the fridge determine what you do with it?

Also, WHO THE HELL DOESN'T KNOW TO REFRIGERATE YOGURT?
 
2014-03-29 04:24:36 PM  
This is a battle I've had with my father for 15 years. WHY DO YOU THINK BREAD BINS EXIST?

And you only need to store eggs in the fridge if you're American, because you strip your eggs of their natural antibacterial barriers in the washing process you use, because you're insane.
 
2014-03-29 04:24:42 PM  

DrunkWithImpotence: EGGS:
Where to store: In the refrigerator, obviously, but more precisely...
Where exactly: In the back of the fridge- not in the door, even if your fridge has one of those egg-holder things. "Those holders are in a horrible location, because eggs need to be stored as cold as possible and that door is the warmest place," notes Davison. "So take that thing out, it's usually removable, and store them in the back of the fridge."

Depends...  I keep my fridge really cold.  If I put eggs way in the back, the ones closest to the back wall can actually freeze and crack open.  The door is perfect for them.


I only recently learned it's mostly only American eggs that need to be stored in the fridge at all.
 
2014-03-29 04:27:44 PM  
I'm a regular sammich eater and I notice my bread gets moldy faster sitting out.  Also, if I'm feeling it and don't want to deal with cold firm bread I'll toast it, or let it sit out to get to room temp.
 
2014-03-29 04:27:50 PM  
My husband puts the bread on top of the fridge where it vents a bunch of hot air. We can get the bread to get mouldier even faster now.
 
2014-03-29 04:28:01 PM  
Oh my god how to people make it through the day without serious injury...

It's very simple.  If it's in a cooler or freezer at the store, that's where you should put it when you get home.  If it's not, and it's sealed, then read the package to see if you need to "refrigerate after opening".
 
2014-03-29 04:28:35 PM  
OK, Fark foodie type, here's one I've never figured out.

There's two bins in my fridge for storing fruits and veggies.  One is 'crisp', I think, and I forget the other.  I never bother with them, though.  I think one is designed to have more humidity than the other.

Which goes where, and why?  I just shove fruits and veggies on the shelves in the bags I use from the produce section of the store.
 
2014-03-29 04:30:10 PM  
I thought you're supposed to put all your eggs in one basket.

Is that wrong?
 
2014-03-29 04:30:52 PM  
I lived with my uncle and argued about this with him many times. Bread was in the fridge. His house, his rules.

He is dead now.
 
2014-03-29 04:31:31 PM  
I have to keep my bread in a high cabinet, otherwise my cat will eat it. He got started on sweet Hawaiian rolls, and ever since then, you just can't leave bread out.
 
2014-03-29 04:31:42 PM  

syndre: I lived with my uncle and argued about this with him many times. Bread was in the fridge. His house, his rules.

He is dead now.


Holy fark. You take your bread seriously!
 
2014-03-29 04:31:49 PM  
See, nobody knows how to handle food.  There's too much disagreement and controversy, which is why we should all just eat fast food or drink each others' blood.  It's probably statistically safer and it creates jobs of some kind.
 
2014-03-29 04:32:09 PM  

StillInFayettestan: EGGS:

No.  Not here in Germany.  On the kitchen counter for a day or two prior to baking/cooking and such.   This freak me out when I married my old girl.


There's a difference between German and American eggs, at least the super-market kind.  German eggs covet the Sudetenland Just kidding.  German (and European eggs generally) are not overwashed before sale.  That leaves intact a membrane called the cuticle which inhibits bacteria growth and slows oxidation.   American eggs are washed which paradoxically leaves them more vulnerable to salmonella and makes them go bad more quickly.

This may not be true of farmers market eggs.  Ask your farmer.
 
2014-03-29 04:32:12 PM  
I keep my bread in the fridge or freezer. I always buy two loafs of buttered bread (Publix Brand), one goes in the freezer and when the first loaf is a quarter done, I throw the freezer Loaf in the fridge to defrost).
I've never had a problem with this, never noticed a difference in taste - only the fact that my second loaf won't turn green for a few weeks.

It really depends how much bread I eat, if Its been out a few days, I throw half of it in the fridge, rather then lose it, but lately I simply keep the entire loaf in the fridge - however it really sucks this way.
 
2014-03-29 04:32:24 PM  

lordjupiter: Oh my god how to people make it through the day without serious injury...

It's very simple.  If it's in a cooler or freezer at the store, that's where you should put it when you get home.  If it's not, and it's sealed, then read the package to see if you need to "refrigerate after opening".


I keep trying to explain this to my husband about pastry that I bake- have you ever been in a bakery?  Do they keep the pastries refrigerated? No.  If you want it to last then freeze it.  Jeez.
 
2014-03-29 04:32:36 PM  

lordjupiter: If moisture is the rationale for not putting bread in the fridge then doesn't the relative humidity in the kitchen vs the fridge determine what you do with it?

Also, WHO THE HELL DOESN'T KNOW TO REFRIGERATE YOGURT?


I make my own yogurt above my refrigerator.

/of course then I move it into the refrigerator
 
2014-03-29 04:33:52 PM  

TheShavingofOccam123: lordjupiter: If moisture is the rationale for not putting bread in the fridge then doesn't the relative humidity in the kitchen vs the fridge determine what you do with it?

Also, WHO THE HELL DOESN'T KNOW TO REFRIGERATE YOGURT?

I make my own yogurt above my refrigerator.

/of course then I move it into the refrigerator


Right.  Making and storing are totally different.  A chicken's vagina is not refrigerated.
 
2014-03-29 04:34:24 PM  

Manfred J. Hattan: blah blah blah



All those other posts about American v. European eggs weren't there while I looked for the strikeout key.
 
2014-03-29 04:34:33 PM  
Whatever you do, don't put your coffee in the freezer.  Moisture condenses on the beans/grounds every time you take it out of the cold, making it go bad significantly faster.  Sealed in an air-tight, dark container makes it last the longest.  Grinding the beans just before you brew makes a better cup, but I guess that's a separate issue altogether.
 
2014-03-29 04:34:43 PM  
This person clearly never has even eaten bread if he/she/it thinks bread in the fridge is bad. My bread stores for a month in there. Never goes stale, like on the counter.

/shakes head at consumerist
/shakes fist at morons
 
2014-03-29 04:34:54 PM  

somemoron: OK, Fark foodie type, here's one I've never figured out.

There's two bins in my fridge for storing fruits and veggies.  One is 'crisp', I think, and I forget the other.  I never bother with them, though.  I think one is designed to have more humidity than the other.

Which goes where, and why?  I just shove fruits and veggies on the shelves in the bags I use from the produce section of the store.


I used to use the drawer labeled "crisper" for fruits and veggies. The other drawer was for my raw meats so they don't dribble juices over other stuff in the fridge. Have no idea whether that's proper but that's the way I did it. We were taught in food service training that food safety dictates raw meat is always stored low.
 
2014-03-29 04:35:30 PM  
Leaving the butter out is a no go in our house, unless you don't mind that the cats lick it.
 
2014-03-29 04:36:34 PM  
I buy two breads at a time, one goes to the freezer and the other in a kitchen cabinet beside the peanut butter.
I put my eggs in the fridge wherever there is space for them. The article writer would be horrified to know that in Europe they leave them outside the fridge.
 
2014-03-29 04:37:03 PM  

Gestankfaust: This person clearly never has even eaten bread if he/she/it thinks bread in the fridge is bad. My bread stores for a month in there. Never goes stale, like on the counter.

/shakes head at consumerist
/shakes fist at morons


It does go stale. There's no way it can't, it's how starch molecules work. You're just so used to slightly stale, harder bread, you don't realise what fresh bread actually tastes like any more.
 
2014-03-29 04:40:00 PM  
Very informative article.   Although,  I would love to know if my method of storing uncooked meat in a bucket behind the furnace is correct.
 
2014-03-29 04:40:23 PM  

Plush_Cthulhu: Leaving the butter out is a no go in our house, unless you don't mind that the cats lick it.


www.rubbermaid.com
 
2014-03-29 04:40:40 PM  

Plush_Cthulhu: Leaving the butter out is a no go in our house, unless you don't mind that the cats lick it.


Get a glass butter dish.
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com
 
2014-03-29 04:41:29 PM  

pnkgtr: No, freezer.


No. All you'll get is dried-out bread with a wet slimy crust once it's thawed.
 
2014-03-29 04:42:27 PM  

StillInFayettestan: EGGS:

No.  Not here in Germany.  On the kitchen counter for a day or two prior to baking/cooking and such.   This freak me out when I married my old girl.


Bring eggs to room temperature before cooking or (especially) baking with them. We get eggs in bulk because at the five to seven dozen point the price becomes VERY good. That means refrigeration or even freezing.
 
2014-03-29 04:43:13 PM  

TV's Vinnie: pnkgtr: No, freezer.

No. All you'll get is dried-out bread with a wet slimy crust once it's thawed.


The freezer is perfect for bread that's only going to be toasted. There is no method for using freezer bread for non-toasting.
 
2014-03-29 04:43:34 PM  

Plush_Cthulhu: Leaving the butter out is a no go in our house, unless you don't mind that the cats lick it.


The french make a butter dish that slips over a small tub of water. Which means my cats would knock the thing over, drink up the water and lick all the butter up. Cats always win.
 
2014-03-29 04:45:40 PM  

anuran: StillInFayettestan: EGGS:

No.  Not here in Germany.  On the kitchen counter for a day or two prior to baking/cooking and such.   This freak me out when I married my old girl.

Bring eggs to room temperature before cooking or (especially) baking with them. We get eggs in bulk because at the five to seven dozen point the price becomes VERY good. That means refrigeration or even freezing.


Are you saying you freeze raw eggs? Huh.  Learn something new every day
 
2014-03-29 04:46:53 PM  

RoyBatty: DrunkWithImpotence: EGGS:
Where to store: In the refrigerator, obviously, but more precisely...
Where exactly: In the back of the fridge- not in the door, even if your fridge has one of those egg-holder things. "Those holders are in a horrible location, because eggs need to be stored as cold as possible and that door is the warmest place," notes Davison. "So take that thing out, it's usually removable, and store them in the back of the fridge."

Depends...  I keep my fridge really cold.  If I put eggs way in the back, the ones closest to the back wall can actually freeze and crack open.  The door is perfect for them.

I only recently learned it's mostly only American eggs that need to be stored in the fridge at all.


A friend of mine lived in Ireland for a while, and now insists on leaving her eggs out back in the US.  I try to tell her that she needs to refrigerate American eggs and she just rolls her eyes at me.
 
2014-03-29 04:47:00 PM  

RoyBatty: DrunkWithImpotence: EGGS:
Where to store: In the refrigerator, obviously, but more precisely...
Where exactly: In the back of the fridge- not in the door, even if your fridge has one of those egg-holder things. "Those holders are in a horrible location, because eggs need to be stored as cold as possible and that door is the warmest place," notes Davison. "So take that thing out, it's usually removable, and store them in the back of the fridge."

Depends...  I keep my fridge really cold.  If I put eggs way in the back, the ones closest to the back wall can actually freeze and crack open.  The door is perfect for them.

I only recently learned it's mostly only American eggs that need to be stored in the fridge at all.


Yeah, it's because they are washed or somesuch before sale, that removes the natural coating.  Even so, they only need to be kept cool to stay fresh for weeks.  They aren't super perishable like cream or meat.
 
2014-03-29 04:49:10 PM  

peacheslatour: anuran: StillInFayettestan: EGGS:

No.  Not here in Germany.  On the kitchen counter for a day or two prior to baking/cooking and such.   This freak me out when I married my old girl.

Bring eggs to room temperature before cooking or (especially) baking with them. We get eggs in bulk because at the five to seven dozen point the price becomes VERY good. That means refrigeration or even freezing.

Are you saying you freeze raw eggs? Huh.  Learn something new every day


You can freeze eggs out their shell, but I wouldn't recommend them for anything outside of being used as a baking or binding agent - don't eat them as fried of scrambled. You can't freeze in-shell eggs, unless you have a flash-freezer.
 
2014-03-29 04:50:59 PM  
Whut?  Hunh?  I keep my "bread" in a bank, man.

/Dave ain't there, man
 
2014-03-29 04:52:41 PM  

vodka: Ugh, I see the same advice all the time. The fact is I keep my 100% whole wheat bread in the refrigerator. If I don't it will mould within a couple days. Even after many weeks it does not taste stale in the slightest. It literally takes at least a month before it even starts to get stale. I don't see the problem with the refrigerator.


Normal people eat their bread, rather than trying to store it for weeks.
 
2014-03-29 04:53:15 PM  
Anything involving gluten-free goes in the trash.
 
2014-03-29 04:54:51 PM  
if your refrigerator bread starts getting a little stale, pop it in the microwave for 10-15 seconds. this workaround does not fix moldy shelf-bread.
 
2014-03-29 04:56:30 PM  

DrunkWithImpotence: EGGS:
Where to store:

Depends...


Are you trying to hatch them?
 
Displayed 50 of 141 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report