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(Gawker)   No O Face: The Flair Guy from Office Space lost a lawsuit over "Illegal Flair"   (gawker.com) divider line 23
    More: Silly, Chotchkies, brand extension, orgasms, United States District Court  
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4665 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 29 Mar 2014 at 3:42 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



23 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-03-29 11:51:49 AM  
dashburst.com
 
2014-03-29 12:07:20 PM  
Signatures have consequences.
 
2014-03-29 03:46:58 PM  
i.kinja-img.com
 
2014-03-29 03:55:20 PM  

clancifer: Signatures have consequences.


Let's not "Jump to Conclusions".
 
2014-03-29 04:13:43 PM  
WOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!
 
2014-03-29 04:15:15 PM  
I Imagine thats a rough thing for an actor.  I was an extra in a Coors Light commercial years ago.  I had to sign a contract that said basically they can use my image in any advertising for all eternity, yada yada yada and I would only get paid the flat fee I was offered for the commercial (maybe $200?)

I asked the guy "What if I don't sign this?"

He said "Someone else will be in the commercial!"

It was a whole "It's so hot in here that...." bit and I ended up being front and center in the commercial, had several lines and then started to worry that the commercials would become popular.  This was right after the Bud "wazzzzzzup" commercials and I was scared we'd become the famous "It's so hot in here....." guys and I just signed away any rights to future cash.

The commercials came and went so I had nothing to worry about.

/HSB
 
2014-03-29 04:21:43 PM  
Not sure how this even made the news. Must have been a slow day.
 
2014-03-29 04:24:43 PM  
You know, the Nazis had pieces of flair that they made the Jews wear.
 
2014-03-29 04:26:24 PM  

buntz: I Imagine thats a rough thing for an actor.  I was an extra in a Coors Light commercial years ago.  I had to sign a contract that said basically they can use my image in any advertising for all eternity, yada yada yada and I would only get paid the flat fee I was offered for the commercial (maybe $200?)

I asked the guy "What if I don't sign this?"

He said "Someone else will be in the commercial!"

It was a whole "It's so hot in here that...." bit and I ended up being front and center in the commercial, had several lines and then started to worry that the commercials would become popular.  This was right after the Bud "wazzzzzzup" commercials and I was scared we'd become the famous "It's so hot in here....." guys and I just signed away any rights to future cash.

The commercials came and went so I had nothing to worry about.

/HSB


I read a few years ago, Clint Eastwood told some child actor to take a percentage of the gross income of a movie rather then taking a paycheck. I think he was offered like $54,000, or he could of chose less then 1% of the gross income, anyhow the kid ended up getting over a million dollars. I guess most struggling actors would rather take a lump sum, in this case the kid has enough money to go to college and such (I don't think he appeared else where).

For commercials I am assuming this is different, but I have no clue.
 
2014-03-29 04:35:28 PM  

Misconduc: For commercials I am assuming this is different, but I have no clue.


Yeah, I don't know how it works if you're making it your life.  I signed up at the film office out of college for shiats and giggles.  They called eventually because they needed "college aged men" for a beer commercial so I was just excited to be called for a commercial.  I didn't think I would have lines or anything.  Just assumed I'd be in the background.

But it was pretty much "You want to be in the commercial?  Sign this!"  If I don't want to sign it, that's fine.  I just won't be in the commercial.  Of course I signed it.

The commercial aired a few times that summer and I never saw it again (this was 1995?  1996?)
 
2014-03-29 05:15:18 PM  

Misconduc: I read a few years ago, Clint Eastwood told some child actor to take a percentage of the gross income of a movie rather then taking a paycheck. I think he was offered like $54,000, or he could of chose less then 1% of the gross income, anyhow the kid ended up getting over a million dollars. I guess most struggling actors would rather take a lump sum, in this case the kid has enough money to go to college and such (I don't think he appeared else where).


You have to have pretty significant clout in Hollywood to even be offered a gross points deal, so unless this "child actor" was an above-the-line A-lister (who probably wouldn't need to be told to take gross points), your story got crossed up somewhere.

It is similar, however, to a true -- or at least very widely retold -- story about Donald Sutherland in "Animal House." He was offered a gross point of the box office, but instead took about a fixed $60K, concerned that the film wasn't going to amount to much. The decision probably cost him several million.
 
2014-03-29 05:29:30 PM  

Uzzah: Misconduc: I read a few years ago, Clint Eastwood told some child actor to take a percentage of the gross income of a movie rather then taking a paycheck. I think he was offered like $54,000, or he could of chose less then 1% of the gross income, anyhow the kid ended up getting over a million dollars. I guess most struggling actors would rather take a lump sum, in this case the kid has enough money to go to college and such (I don't think he appeared else where).

You have to have pretty significant clout in Hollywood to even be offered a gross points deal, so unless this "child actor" was an above-the-line A-lister (who probably wouldn't need to be told to take gross points), your story got crossed up somewhere.

It is similar, however, to a true -- or at least very widely retold -- story about Donald Sutherland in "Animal House." He was offered a gross point of the box office, but instead took about a fixed $60K, concerned that the film wasn't going to amount to much. The decision probably cost him several million.


I have absolutely no idea that's why I am asking, far as I know the kid never was an actor, or have ever been in movies. For what its worth the story was about Bee Vang, from Gran Torino, from what the article said - clint eastwood told him to choose "gross points" rather then a payout.
Only reason I drew a blank, was because the guy in the captain phillips  movie was said to only make $60,000. I wondered if they didn't have a choice in it or not, but I certainly see the point "either take the money, or we find someone else!".

Its probably some onion story which someone wrote, I know nothing about hollywood - thats why I wondered, I seen the same thing about "Star Wars" a few years ago, someone on the cast was offered "points" but didn't take it, rather he took a payout.
 
2014-03-29 05:49:34 PM  

red5ish: Not sure how this even made the news. Must have been a slow day.


The latest link on the Politics Tab is from August of last year. I think the admins are still drunk from last night.
 
2014-03-29 05:58:12 PM  

Uzzah: Misconduc: I read a few years ago, Clint Eastwood told some child actor to take a percentage of the gross income of a movie rather then taking a paycheck. I think he was offered like $54,000, or he could of chose less then 1% of the gross income, anyhow the kid ended up getting over a million dollars. I guess most struggling actors would rather take a lump sum, in this case the kid has enough money to go to college and such (I don't think he appeared else where). You have to have pretty significant clout in Hollywood to even be offered a gross points deal, so unless this "child actor" was an above-the-line A-lister (who probably wouldn't need to be told to take gross points), your story got crossed up somewhere. It is similar, however, to a true -- or at least very widely retold -- story about Donald Sutherland in "Animal House." He was offered a gross point of the box office, but instead took about a fixed $60K, concerned that the film wasn't going to amount to much. The decision probably cost him several million.


I heard that story but it was Danny DeVito telling Arnold Schwarzenegger to join him in working for scale and taking points.
The story is now that they worked for free ( unlikely as that would violate SAG rules ):
http://www.express.co.uk/news/showbiz/373216/Arnold-Schwarzenegger-a nd -Danny-DeVito-made-Twins-for-free
 
2014-03-29 05:58:24 PM  

buntz: I ended up being front and center in the commercial, had several lines and then started to worry that the commercials would become popular.


Must have been a non-union production if they got away with paying you as an extra and using you as a principal performer.
 
2014-03-29 06:07:38 PM  

poot_rootbeer: Must have been a non-union production if they got away with paying you as an extra and using you as a principal performer.


I don't know?  There was 5 or 6 of us, in a semi-circle (in front of the camera) with the rest of the bar behind us.  They told us "say as many "it's so hot..." jokes you can think of and....GO!"

I used a bunch of old Johnny Carson jokes (that didn't get used) like "It's so hot I saw 2 trees fighting over one dog!"
One guy said "I have to put my underwear in the freezer!"

My line that got used (that is pretty lame) was "It's so hot a 10 minute walk took me an hour and a half!"

So then the tagline was "one way to cool off is with a Coors Light!"

And then we all used different "cold" lines, like:  Arctic cold, freezing cold, bitter cold, chilly, etc etc..."
 
2014-03-29 06:26:27 PM  

fusillade762: red5ish: Not sure how this even made the news. Must have been a slow day.

The latest link on the Politics Tab is from August of last year. I think the admins are still drunk from last night.


You know, I think you may be right.
 
2014-03-29 07:01:57 PM  
What "illegal Flair" might look like:
www.thesmokinggun.com
WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!
 
2014-03-29 09:10:09 PM  

clintster: What "illegal Flair" might look like:
[www.thesmokinggun.com image 373x450]
WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!


Came for this,
 
2014-03-29 11:51:43 PM  

Uzzah: Misconduc: I read a few years ago, Clint Eastwood told some child actor to take a percentage of the gross income of a movie rather then taking a paycheck. I think he was offered like $54,000, or he could of chose less then 1% of the gross income, anyhow the kid ended up getting over a million dollars. I guess most struggling actors would rather take a lump sum, in this case the kid has enough money to go to college and such (I don't think he appeared else where).

You have to have pretty significant clout in Hollywood to even be offered a gross points deal, so unless this "child actor" was an above-the-line A-lister (who probably wouldn't need to be told to take gross points), your story got crossed up somewhere.

It is similar, however, to a true -- or at least very widely retold -- story about Donald Sutherland in "Animal House." He was offered a gross point of the box office, but instead took about a fixed $60K, concerned that the film wasn't going to amount to much. The decision probably cost him several million.


Clint was writer/director/producer of the movie he very well could have offered the kid gross points. Clint's a decent guy.
 
2014-03-30 10:20:25 AM  

poot_rootbeer: buntz: I ended up being front and center in the commercial, had several lines and then started to worry that the commercials would become popular.

Must have been a non-union production if they got away with paying you as an extra and using you as a principal performer.


I remember Matt Leblanc saying that before he became famous he made a ketchup commercial, without any lines, and got checks in the mail for years after. Not millions but not peanuts either.
 
2014-03-30 12:35:05 PM  

clintster: What "illegal Flair" might look like:
[www.thesmokinggun.com image 373x450]
WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!


Man, those blade marks are terrible.
 
2014-03-30 01:09:16 PM  

Misconduc


I have absolutely no idea that's why I am asking, far as I know the kid never was an actor, or have ever been in movies. For what its worth the story was about Bee Vang, from Gran Torino, from what the article said - clint eastwood told him to choose "gross points" rather then a payout.
Only reason I drew a blank,


tee hee
 
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