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(Philly.com)   Your content is worthless   (philly.com) divider line 35
    More: Interesting, TEDxPhiladelphia, Temple University, industrial designer, home recording, performing arts center, recaps, subscription model, TED Talks  
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4062 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 Mar 2014 at 2:49 PM (34 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



35 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-03-29 02:55:53 PM  
Is it a coincidence how punchable that guy's face is? I think not.
 
2014-03-29 03:00:11 PM  
This is one of those cases where a person has a minor insight and then dramatizes into a earth shattering critique of modern living. Which would be OK if he were six years old but it's kind of embarrassing in a grown man.
 
2014-03-29 03:06:48 PM  

worlddan: This is one of those cases where a person has a minor insight and then dramatizes into a earth shattering critique of modern living.


Yes, but can't we just be glad he made it a short lecture instead of a 300 page self-help book?
 
2014-03-29 03:07:26 PM  
But how do you monetize it?  Because I can't eat "the community."
 
2014-03-29 03:13:33 PM  
TED. yep worthless.
 
2014-03-29 03:23:17 PM  
I see this as eventually the model for most musicians - money is only made from live performances and recordings only serve as advertisements. This will rule out the talentless pop stars and their music which can only be created in a studio (except for those whose "concerts" are just dance routines to pre-recorded tracks).

There will still be some studio-mostly musicians but they will be paid for providing background music to advertisements and movies.

Maybe, further in the future most actors will make more from theater than movies.
 
2014-03-29 03:37:00 PM  

HenryFnord: But how do you monetize it?  Because I can't eat "the community."


You become a douchebag producer who makes money off of other people's efforts whole telling them their contributions have no value.
 
2014-03-29 03:37:45 PM  
"While," not "whole." Thanks, phone.
 
2014-03-29 03:47:16 PM  
Eh - I think he has a perfectly valid point.  Look at Fark - what content is produced here?  It's a community that, from a web traffic perspective, leeches the content of others who actually produce it.

Web comics have a big problem with this.  Sit down and spend a weekend and come up with a funny image and post it somewhere.  If it's remotely funny at all, it'll be copied and reposted all over the web - to large sites with large communities who won't care who wrote.  You can send out DCMA requests for the next 6 months trying to stop it, and they'll comply (knowing full well by the time you find it, their users will have already gotten their fill).
 
2014-03-29 04:07:41 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: Eh - I think he has a perfectly valid point.  Look at Fark - what content is produced here?  It's a community that, from a web traffic perspective, leeches the content of others who actually produce it.


It is a valid point but he's exaggerating the claim. You're correct about Fark but there are plenty of other successful business models that are not Fark.

Web comics have a big problem with this.  Sit down and spend a weekend and come up with a funny image and post it somewhere.  If it's remotely funny at all, it'll be copied and reposted all over the web - to large sites with large communities who won't care who wrote.  You can send out DCMA requests for the next 6 months trying to stop it, and they'll comply (knowing full well by the time you find it, their users will have already gotten their fill).

Again, true enough. But there are plenty of counter examples. One example where people have manged to do well is with indie video games. There is a lot of junk that exists but if one has talent and hard work its possible to make a great deal of money doing so without any "community" at all or by leeching off a larger community like Steam or GoG. Another example is from the music business itself. Look at The Civil Wars--they are indie who have made themselves multimillionaires without investing one dollar in a community.

Content does matter. It may be that these days it's more a jack than a king but to say it is worthless is an strong exaggeration, the type of exaggeration made by someone who has something to sell and not offering an honest viewpoint on the matter.
 
2014-03-29 04:33:34 PM  

oryx: TED. yep worthless.


Nope, TEDx, TED's stupid little brother. This guy fits the bill.
 
2014-03-29 05:38:07 PM  

worlddan: One example where people have manged to do well is with indie video games. There is a lot of junk that exists but if one has talent and hard work its possible to make a great deal of money doing so without any "community" at all or by leeching off a larger community like Steam or GoG.


While I don't disagree with your overall point regarding the success of indie games, I wouldn't include Steam in there, as it detracts from your point: Steam has intense DRM, unlike GoG or the web comics in the post you're responding to - the indie games on Steam aren't being copied and distributed everywhere, because that requires a lot more work than merely uploading a torrent file.
 
2014-03-29 05:54:05 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: Eh - I think he has a perfectly valid point. Look at Fark - what content is produced here? It's a community that, from a web traffic perspective, leeches the content of others who actually produce it.


Opposing Views leeches traffic. They take other people's work and do a very minor rewrite and post it as their own content. Considering that Fark links to the content instead of rehosting/rewriting it, I'd say "leeching" is a misnomer. At worst Fark works as a filter that removes people's need to browse the content producer's site continuously to see if anything interesting has been written recently. On the other hand, it does open up sites to a huge public who might otherwise not read them at all.
 
2014-03-29 06:17:13 PM  

worlddan: Fark_Guy_Rob: Eh - I think he has a perfectly valid point.  Look at Fark - what content is produced here?  It's a community that, from a web traffic perspective, leeches the content of others who actually produce it.

It is a valid point but he's exaggerating the claim. You're correct about Fark but there are plenty of other successful business models that are not Fark.

Web comics have a big problem with this.  Sit down and spend a weekend and come up with a funny image and post it somewhere.  If it's remotely funny at all, it'll be copied and reposted all over the web - to large sites with large communities who won't care who wrote.  You can send out DCMA requests for the next 6 months trying to stop it, and they'll comply (knowing full well by the time you find it, their users will have already gotten their fill).

Again, true enough. But there are plenty of counter examples. One example where people have manged to do well is with indie video games. There is a lot of junk that exists but if one has talent and hard work its possible to make a great deal of money doing so without any "community" at all or by leeching off a larger community like Steam or GoG. Another example is from the music business itself. Look at The Civil Wars--they are indie who have made themselves multimillionaires without investing one dollar in a community.

Content does matter. It may be that these days it's more a jack than a king but to say it is worthless is an strong exaggeration, the type of exaggeration made by someone who has something to sell and not offering an honest viewpoint on the matter.


Agreed 100% - I just *expect* that level of exaggeration from well, everything.  So I don't get caught up by it.  There are counter-examples, like you mention.
 
2014-03-29 07:00:06 PM  
lol...maybe he got around to reading this
/This was my focus for my economics degree
 
2014-03-29 07:06:14 PM  
TED is worthless. Buzzword, popscience, something inflamatory, more funding needed.
 
2014-03-29 08:07:36 PM  
Another tech nerd who has decided that people should work for free but engage his services so he can make money off their effort.
 
2014-03-29 09:03:26 PM  

HenryFnord: But how do you monetize it?  Because I can't eat "the community."


I disagree. They just need to be properly prepared. Maybe we'll try that for dinner tomorrow.
 
2014-03-29 09:11:52 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: Eh - I think he has a perfectly valid point.  Look at Fark - what content is produced here?  It's a community that, from a web traffic perspective, leeches the content of others who actually produce it.


As a content producer, Fark can leech off of my content all it likes.  I'm all for the extra couple thousand clicks.
 
2014-03-29 09:30:28 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: Web comics have a big problem with this.  Sit down and spend a weekend and come up with a funny image and post it somewhere.  If it's remotely funny at all, it'll be copied and reposted all over the web - to large sites with large communities who won't care who wrote.  You can send out DCMA requests for the next 6 months trying to stop it, and they'll comply (knowing full well by the time you find it, their users will have already gotten their fill).


Eh, look at guys like Matt Inman. He's a consummate post-Fordist businessman - give away free web comics, take the popular ones and slap them on mugs, t-shirts, and posters made in one-off, in small batch orders. Offer to sign them for a bit more. Reorder the popular items, let the unpopular ones die on a vine, rake in the money.

If the comics are seen as advertising vehicle for the merchandise, then every time someone "steals" one and posts it elsewhere is a net win for you.

Sounds like this guy wants to offer the same sort of thing for music. Not exactly an earth shattering revelation.
 
2014-03-29 10:33:02 PM  
What about my discontent?
 
2014-03-29 10:46:15 PM  
My content is not worthless.
 
2014-03-29 11:16:35 PM  

oryx: TED. yep worthless.


Yeah, I feel like the "ironic" tag might have been appropriate here.

// I mean dramatic irony, not rhetorical irony, by the way, before some ass brings up the usual arguments.  We (the audience) know that TED talks as they currently are exceed even the usual Sturgeon's law levels of crap and that he is in fact hawking useless content, but he (the actor in the drama) isn't aware of this and it lends his words a different connotation/meaning than their explicit meaning (that he is an incredibly un-self-aware moron).
 
2014-03-29 11:34:55 PM  
I don't think I've paid for music since the turn of the century. And I listen to a fair bit.
 
2014-03-29 11:39:29 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: Eh - I think he has a perfectly valid point.  Look at Fark - what content is produced here?  It's a community that, from a web traffic perspective, leeches the content of others who actually produce it.

Web comics have a big problem with this.  Sit down and spend a weekend and come up with a funny image and post it somewhere.  If it's remotely funny at all, it'll be copied and reposted all over the web - to large sites with large communities who won't care who wrote.  You can send out DCMA requests for the next 6 months trying to stop it, and they'll comply (knowing full well by the time you find it, their users will have already gotten their fill).


I would attribute this more to the inherent value of aggregation itself.  There are thousands of comic artists around the web who regularly produce content, but most of it isn't that good. Not good enough that people will check their websites regularly.  However, if you look at all those sites collectively and let the good content float to the top and the bad content sink to the bottom, you've got a system where people can actually succeed.  This is part of the reason youtube was such a success. People in webcomics do themselves a disservice by not networking together to promote their content, and stick to their own little websites hoping to somehow lure in traffic. It's no surprise that outside systems develop to fill the void - there is value in filtering content, even when you let the users do it.
 
2014-03-30 12:04:20 AM  
I make really sucky music that no one wants to listen to but I have a lot of friends.
 
2014-03-30 12:37:22 AM  
The problem is that most people's content IS worthless (in terms of making money). How many times have you ever left a pub thinking "wow" about a band you heard? shiat, I've only once seen a support act that was new to me where I wanted to hear more of their music to the point where I bought their album.

I played in a pub band and met people who did the same and I told them with sincerity and goodwill not to give up the day job because they were a good pub band, but that was all. They lacked the ability to touch people which is the magic in all art. Whether that's to make you laugh or cry or think or feel or dance, it's got to do that. Writing a servicable song just isn't enough.

Read "Lost in Music" by Giles Smith. There's a bit where he reveals that he knew Nik Kershaw and everyone pretty much could see that Nik had that extra something, and they didn't.
 
2014-03-30 12:59:44 AM  
...at Temple University's Performing Arts Center

Somehow, TUPAC is still influencing the future of music.
 
2014-03-30 01:13:53 AM  
At first I thought this headline referred to Buzzfeed (which it should, because Fark really scraped the bottom of the barrel for a "publishing partner.") TED / TEDx, though... still extremely appropriate.


/Buzzfeed still needs to DIAF though.
// Seriously, screw Buzzfeed.
 
2014-03-30 04:22:02 AM  
I don't know what I'm more shocked by: the Inquirer reporting on a TED talk or someone I've met giving one.

Brian's a hell of a nice guy and a good producer.  He's been thinking about this stuff for more than a decade at this point (as, I must admit, have all my musician friends to some degree).
 
2014-03-30 11:18:02 AM  
TED is intellectual porn.  Makes you feel good for a few minutes, "Yeah! I agree-I'm so smart like you!" but then you're left with nothing of substance.
 
2014-03-30 02:14:47 PM  

HenryFnord: But how do you monetize it?  Because I can't eat "the community."


You can, if it's the cannibal community.
 
2014-03-30 02:15:54 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: Eh - I think he has a perfectly valid point.  Look at Fark - what content is produced here?  It's a community that, from a web traffic perspective, leeches the content of others who actually produce it.

Web comics have a big problem with this.  Sit down and spend a weekend and come up with a funny image and post it somewhere.  If it's remotely funny at all, it'll be copied and reposted all over the web - to large sites with large communities who won't care who wrote.  You can send out DCMA requests for the next 6 months trying to stop it, and they'll comply (knowing full well by the time you find it, their users will have already gotten their fill).


What about all our clever posts? Those are content, right?
 
2014-03-30 07:51:04 PM  

Unscratchable_Itch: I make really sucky music that no one wants to listen to but I have a lot of friends.


Me too.  Where can I listen to yours?
 
2014-03-31 02:33:07 AM  

Thelyphthoric: Unscratchable_Itch: I make really sucky music that no one wants to listen to but I have a lot of friends.

Me too.  Where can I listen to yours?


Nowhere. That's how bad it is.
 
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