Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Metro)   'This is only the beginning but there could be endless possibilities - from printing functional solutions locally in slums and disaster areas, to high-end hotel rooms that are individually customised and printed in marble dust.'   (metro.co.uk) divider line 24
    More: Interesting, slums, disaster areas  
•       •       •

2102 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 Mar 2014 at 9:54 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



24 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-03-29 01:32:35 AM  
 
2014-03-29 02:36:23 AM  
Fire would be a concern with a plastic house.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-03-29 08:06:27 AM  
Tarkus

Fire is already a concern with modern American houses. They burn much faster and more toxic than 20th Century houses.
 
2014-03-29 10:24:02 AM  
You can make a plastic that doesn't burn that is a materials scientist problem
 
2014-03-29 10:26:29 AM  

Happy Father: You can make a plastic that doesn't burn that is a materials scientist problem


If we start making houses that don't burn what will firemen do? Burn books?
 
2014-03-29 10:28:30 AM  

wildsnowllama: Happy Father: You can make a plastic that doesn't burn that is a materials scientist problem

If we start making houses that don't burn what will firemen do? Burn books?


I see (but can't read) what you did there.
 
2014-03-29 10:45:10 AM  
Love the concept.  I've been a big fan of 3d printing for a while now, the build time noted in the article is a bit on the unrealistic side though.  Three years is an incredibly long time for a residential build.  Love the concept though; lets kick it up a notch now.
 
2014-03-29 11:08:45 AM  
It's an interesting technique though I'm curious about things like longevity/durability of plastic as a primary building material.  How does this particular plastic fare with age?  How does it hold up to UV exposure?  Does it grow more brittle or crack?  What is the melting point?  Will light reflected off windows across the street melt my house? (there have been reports vinyl siding being melted by sunlight focused-by and reflected off of high-efficiency windows installed in adjacent buildings).  How do plastic load-bearing walls behave over time?  Will they remain completely rigid or will they slowly sag or bow ever-so-slightly outward with time?  Any materials scientists care to kabitz?

That said, I do like the idea of a machine-printed house.  Gone will be the days of rooms lacking square corners (unless designed that way).
 
2014-03-29 11:09:36 AM  
upload.wikimedia.org

What 3D printing a house looks like.
 
2014-03-29 11:53:45 AM  

Inigo: What 3D printing a house looks like.


Damn, I came to post something similar.
 
2014-03-29 12:44:39 PM  
These threads just aren't the same without.... You know...
*sniff
 
2014-03-29 01:36:14 PM  

Tarkus: Fire would be a concern with a plastic house.


Fire is a concern with most houses.
 
2014-03-29 01:38:36 PM  
The build is expected to take three years.

This is certainly not going to help disaster areas any time soon.
 
2014-03-29 01:40:50 PM  

Whack-a-Mole: These threads just aren't the same without.... You know...
*sniff


This. So lonely and under commented. Now I'm sniffling too, dammit.
 
2014-03-29 02:22:27 PM  

Elegy: Whack-a-Mole: These threads just aren't the same without.... You know...
*sniff

This. So lonely and under commented. Now I'm sniffling too, dammit.


?
 
2014-03-29 02:48:22 PM  

Kaiser Blade: Elegy: Whack-a-Mole: These threads just aren't the same without.... You know...
*sniff

This. So lonely and under commented. Now I'm sniffling too, dammit.

?


Don't indulge them. Just pour the smallest theoretical bottle of malt liquor on the shiat stained curb.
 
2014-03-29 03:13:07 PM  

Tobin_Lam: The build is expected to take three years.

This is certainly not going to help disaster areas any time soon.


Having a bunch of lightweight, sintered honeycomb bricks on hand to build community structures with would be an Army CoE dream come true.  For massive efforts to keep people out of the elements, though, I prefer the idea of having inflatable tents covered in concrete dust.  Pop up, spray with a little water and you have a rugged structure that can last for a good while.
 
2014-03-29 03:13:46 PM  

Elegy: Whack-a-Mole: These threads just aren't the same without.... You know...
*sniff

This. So lonely and under commented. Now I'm sniffling too, dammit.


img.fark.net
 
2014-03-29 05:40:32 PM  
If we're talking about building in horrible slums, favellas, or places obliterated by natural disasters, I think the faster way to go is not additive manufacturing with cementaceous materials, but a process of bringing in standardized sheets of wood and/or composite material, and using a truck-mounted CNC  router/cutter to fab walls and other components into kit parts that can be knocked together.

I give you:

Wikihouse:

http://www.wikihouse.cc

What I like about this is that you have many different design and build options, but only one standardized element: a wood or composite material panel, which you can store very densely in shipping containers and warehouses/yards, etc. and it's readily transported into a needy area by ship, rail, boat, truck.  The CNC machine and claw that grabs these panels and cuts them to spec, comes in one truck and you can site that anywhere. The panels could be moved from the cutting site to their last mile by hand laborers using wheeled dollies, or the fab is parked right on site. You can simplify the panels and instructions to make them as easy as legos or lincoln logs to tab and slot and peg together with just mallets... and the same single machine and raw panel stock can make you the mallets and pegs, too! Even basic furniture like bed frames, tables and benches and counters.

I can imagine a "conga line" of these trucks, one forming foundations, the other, cutting out panel parts, and a convoy of supply trucks bringing fuel, stacks of panels and bags of cement and water into the affected area.  Behind them, come SUV's or vans with follow-on electrical and plumbing detail crews.  It's like on-location manufactured home building.
 
2014-03-30 02:51:24 AM  
I am still surprised that with modern concrete and light weight molds made out of carbon fiber that the Edison houses haven't been brought back up.
 
2014-03-30 04:02:55 AM  
Won't it take an awfully long time to print, say, 10,000 'homes'?
 
2014-03-30 04:50:23 AM  

PartTimeBuddha: Won't it take an awfully long time to print, say, 10,000 'homes'?


If you've a single system, yeah. DNRTA but I'm familiar with the concepts involved.

A single machine woulnd't put TOO much of a dent in things but after an emergency it can make barrack-style shelter fairly quickly so that people at least are out of the elements.

In addition, once you've done with that you can start on the more common parts.

If you've got multiple machines, just need a proper manager to keep things flowing so that houses are going up with minimal wait times. Open Sourced... Ecology? I think it was? Had a machine that could easily make hundreds of compressed dirt bricks an hour. Not a horribly great longterm building material but OMFG awesome in case of emergencies.

/drunk otter is drunk
 
2014-03-30 05:13:32 AM  

Summercat: If you've got multiple machines, just need a proper manager to keep things flowing so that houses are going up with minimal wait times. Open Sourced... Ecology? I think it was? Had a machine that could easily make hundreds of compressed dirt bricks an hour. Not a horribly great longterm building material but OMFG awesome in case of emergencies.


I can see sense in that--with, say, a hundred scuttlebots, putting together suitably-strong brick houses like Lego pieces. That would be hilarious (cool hilarious) to watch and could actually work.

But I can't see 3D printing doing it. These Amsterdam architects have been plugging their project for two years, now, and it's still another three years from completion. The guy at Contour Crafting isn't doing any better.

I'd love it to work, but it doesn't seem to be making much progress at all.

(Oooh, but wouldn't it be wonderful if you could 3D print a house out of bone?)
 
2014-03-30 09:12:30 PM  
Build a webhouse. Move into the Internet.
 
Displayed 24 of 24 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report