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(ABC)   Bank accidentally deposits $31,000 into teen's account. Underachiever teen only managed to spend $25,000 in the ten days before the error was caught   (abcnews.go.com) divider line 363
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12417 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Mar 2014 at 2:38 PM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-28 06:31:01 PM  

Tom_Slick: Exactly, advertising a $32,000 car for $29,000 and not selling it at that price is false advertising. Advertising a $32,000 car for $3,200 and not selling at that price is an obvious typo, anyone who tries to sue over that will end up paying the dealership huge legal fees after being shamed out of court.


So, where, exactly, does it stop being false advertisement, and start being a typo?

image.shutterstock.com
Because there are such things as 90% off sales:

1.bp.blogspot.com

/show your work
 
2014-03-28 06:31:26 PM  

LemSkroob: DROxINxTHExWIND: JesusJuice: fark the bank. Their mistake, they should eat it. It's not like the bastards can't afford it.


Ever lost your car keys? Should the person who finds them be able to take ownership of your car?

There is a difference between finding car keys laying on the ground, and someone walking up to you in the street, shoving the keys in your pocket, and then walking away.


Sure, but those keys may not have been theirs to shove in your pocket and either way doesn't entitle you to the car.
 
2014-03-28 06:38:00 PM  

Inflatable Rhetoric: groppet: DROxINxTHExWIND: Endive Wombat: Anyone else here seriously curious about what he spent the money on thus far?

Being 18, and likely in high school, I am going to guess he's given a bit to friends, he's received a lot of BJ's and sex, and probably blew it on a bunch of crap like Xboxs and Playstations...


Clothing, a vehicle, jewelry, drugs, alcohol, travel, eating out


/No specific order

Maybe he blew it all on a fancy record player

"I spent most of it on booze and women, then I blew the rest." - I forget where I heard that.


I thought it was more like "I blew the money on booze and women, the rest I just wasted."
 
2014-03-28 06:38:37 PM  
For the so many willfully ignorant on this thread. The wikipedia definition of Uttering.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uttering

The kid is looking a felony charges. Still think he did nothing wrong?

Some of you folks are denser than Neutronium!.
 
2014-03-28 06:39:00 PM  

RockofAges: MycroftHolmes: RockofAges: or it to be theft, whom is he stealing it from? Certainly not from any individual account holder. Therefor, "the bank"?

I find it so interesting that people are fine with a power arrangement in which the powerful are allowed to hold absolute moral authority, set the rules, AND disperse ALL responsibility to the four winds.

BUT

When Johnny Six-Pack collects a bank error in his favour -- that's a paddlin?

Stand on your theory books and scream to the heavens about those hellish 18 year old "thieves" out spending a pittance (to a bank) on magic cards. It's really impressive.

Let me make sure I understand this.  You feel that since banks and the organizations behnd them have money and therefore power, and power defines the rules, you think it is morally acceptable for a person lacking in power to defy those rules because...well, I'll be honest with you, this is where I stop being able to follow you.  Why, exactly, shouldn't it be considered theft?  Your post did have a string of words that seemed to be related to each other in some manner, but I will be danged if I could eke out a logical argument from them.

Okay Mr. Data, let me spell something out for you in human terms. The rules are arbitrary and do not always denote a reference to any direct harm. Show me a victim directly impugned by this faulty deposit, not some caricature, and you'll find my point in the same territory.


If I understand correctly, you are saying that if a harm occurs to a conglomeration such that the harm can be distributed across and not felt by any one member, then no harm occurred?

Or you are saying that banks, as entities, cannot be harmed because...well, again, I can't follow your logic here.
 
2014-03-28 06:45:02 PM  

manbart: From the Article:

The bank told police they would give Fields a deadline of March 19, 5 p.m. to return all the money or they want him prosecuted. On Thursday, the Madison County Sheriff's Office said charges had not yet been filed related to this case.

While he obviously has no legal claim to the money, I wonder what specific crime the bank would prosecute him with?

It seems more like a civil matter than criminal to me.


"Finders keepers" is not what the law says.  The law says finders return to police and if no one claims the property then you can keepers (possibly).  Otherwise it is theft and the value makes it either a misdemeanor or a felony.

With banks there are specific laws covering knowingly taking advantage of an error.  I can't remember if it was federal or state though.
 
2014-03-28 06:48:37 PM  

ReverendJynxed: Just don't waive your right to a jury trial dude, and you're golden.


Just hope he isn't your judge.

theinfosphere.org
"The charge is bank robbery. Now, my caddie's chauffeur informs me that a bank is a place where people put money that isn't properly invested. Therefore, robbing a bank is tantamount to that most heinous of crimes, theft of money "
 
2014-03-28 06:50:03 PM  
Gotta love Fark. Full of dumb asses who defend fraud because the "victim" was an evil banking entity. Listen you dolts the bank is NOT the victim. The guy who had the $31,000 deposited in the wrong account is the victim! I take it you folks have NO problem with that guy losing access to his $31,000 for the ten days it took him to discover the bank's mistake? The money was NEVER the kid's money. He had no right to spend it because there is no way that it was his money in any way shape of form!

Again you doofuses Whose money was it? It was never the kids and it is NOT the bank's money either it belongs to the guy who deposited it. Or is everyone cool with that guy getting ripped off?

I never realized exactly how stupid Farkers truly are before this thread!
 
2014-03-28 06:53:56 PM  

MycroftHolmes: fredklein: DROxINxTHExWIND: JesusJuice: fark the bank. Their mistake, they should eat it. It's not like the bastards can't afford it.


Ever lost your car keys? Should the person who finds them be able to take ownership of your car?

Ever park your car in someone else's garage and hand them the keys, saying "this is yours now"?

That's more like what the bank did. They parked/deposited the car/money in his garage/account. The money was controlled by HIS keys/bank card and pin, and the statement he gets showing his available balance showed the money was his.

If you know for a fact that they are wrong and that the car is not yours, you are committing theft if you take that car and treat it as if you own this.


It is not illegal to receive money, even from an unknown source. Thus, there is no way to "know for a fact" that the money in MY account, isn't mine. In fact, the fact that is in MY account tends to indicate the opposite- that it is, indeed, mine.

If someone delivers something to my house by mistake, it is not mine.

Wrong.

https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0181-unordered-merchandise

Q. Am I obligated to return or pay for merchandise I never ordered?

A. No. If you receive merchandise that you didn't order, you have a legal right to keep it as a free gift.

Now, to be fair, it also says:

Q. What should I do if the unordered merchandise I received was the result of an honest shipping error?

A. Write the seller and offer to return the merchandise, provided the seller pays for postage and handling. Give the seller a specific and reasonable amount of time (say 30 days) to pick up the merchandise or arrange to have it returned at no expense to you. Tell the seller that you reserve the right to keep the merchandise or dispose of it after the specified time has passed.

I think, in this day and age of computers and instant world-wide communication, that 30 days is too long.

Are you saying that just because someone made a mistake, even though you know the goods are not yours, it is not theft to keep them?

I'm saying that if someone GIVES you something, it's yours.  If you believe otherwise, then you think Uncle Joe who gave you that neato Christmas present last year, can just swing by and take it back.
 
2014-03-28 06:53:59 PM  

NicktheSmoker: Lee Jackson Beauregard: Banks have done some evil things.  This isn't one of them.

Exactly, and this is a small town bank, not farking BOA.


First Citizens is in fact a regional bank.  It still ain't BofA.
 
2014-03-28 06:54:40 PM  
If the valet gives you the wrong black Toyota Camry and you drive away, are you charged with auto theft?
 
2014-03-28 06:54:57 PM  

Bullseyed: Ever bought a car and the dealer gives you keys for the deluxe model instead of the base model and they let you drive it around for a month then demand it back?


Similar situation.  I bought a new car with the "Cash 4 Clunkers" handout in 2009 where the dealership gave me a $4,500 down payment credit.  Turns out the vehicle I traded in didn't qualify for the program and the dealership was left holding the bag.
 
2014-03-28 06:56:54 PM  

IRQ12: manbart: From the Article:

The bank told police they would give Fields a deadline of March 19, 5 p.m. to return all the money or they want him prosecuted. On Thursday, the Madison County Sheriff's Office said charges had not yet been filed related to this case.

While he obviously has no legal claim to the money, I wonder what specific crime the bank would prosecute him with?

It seems more like a civil matter than criminal to me.

"Finders keepers" is not what the law says.  The law says finders return to police and if no one claims the property then you can keepers (possibly).  Otherwise it is theft and the value makes it either a misdemeanor or a felony.

With banks there are specific laws covering knowingly taking advantage of an error.  I can't remember if it was federal or state though.


When did I ever say I thought he should be able to keep it? I was just wondering what they meant by this statement.

And I got some plausible answers by the way; either "theft by finding" or "uttering"
 
2014-03-28 06:57:09 PM  

MycroftHolmes: fredklein: DROxINxTHExWIND: IF ITS NOT YOUR PROPERTY DO NOT TAKE IT.

That's the whole point- he didn't "TAKE" it, they GAVE it to him. He didn't commit fraud to get they money in his account- THEY, of their own free will, put it there.

You are saying that he did not take money that he knew did not belong to him and spend it?  There is literally nothing that supports this theory.


I'll say it again: He did not "TAKE" the money. They GAVE it to him. It's spelled out clearly in the article: "...a teller entered the amount into [his] account...". He did not cause this to happen.
 
2014-03-28 06:57:38 PM  

jfivealive: I withdrew money from an ATM once and it said i had over 450k in the bank.  I go online and look at my account, and it says the same thing, even tho I can't find an enormous deposit anywhere.  The next day I look, and its back to normal.

Great story, i know.


It would have been great if you would have transferred it to europe and jumped ship that night.
 
2014-03-28 07:00:31 PM  
Also for you guys who don't get it because the bank  gave him the money.  Think of this analogy:

I sell you my car but accidentally give you the keys to my house, is the house yours?

He's breaking the law because he is knowingly taking advantage of a bank error.   Specifically:  " "unlawfully takes or, being in lawful possession thereof, unlawfully appropriates any property of another with the intention of depriving him of the property, regardless of the manner in which property is taken or appropriated." "
 
2014-03-28 07:00:34 PM  

fredklein: MycroftHolmes: fredklein: DROxINxTHExWIND: IF ITS NOT YOUR PROPERTY DO NOT TAKE IT.

That's the whole point- he didn't "TAKE" it, they GAVE it to him. He didn't commit fraud to get they money in his account- THEY, of their own free will, put it there.

You are saying that he did not take money that he knew did not belong to him and spend it?  There is literally nothing that supports this theory.

I'll say it again: He did not "TAKE" the money. They GAVE it to him. It's spelled out clearly in the article: "...a teller entered the amount into [his] account...". He did not cause this to happen.


You are saying that he did not take money that he knew to be not his out of the bank?  I am not sure I can agree with that.
 
2014-03-28 07:07:14 PM  

MycroftHolmes: fredklein: MycroftHolmes: fredklein: DROxINxTHExWIND: IF ITS NOT YOUR PROPERTY DO NOT TAKE IT.

That's the whole point- he didn't "TAKE" it, they GAVE it to him. He didn't commit fraud to get they money in his account- THEY, of their own free will, put it there.

You are saying that he did not take money that he knew did not belong to him and spend it?  There is literally nothing that supports this theory.

I'll say it again: He did not "TAKE" the money. They GAVE it to him. It's spelled out clearly in the article: "...a teller entered the amount into [his] account...". He did not cause this to happen.

You are saying that he did not take money that he knew to be not his out of the bank?  I am not sure I can agree with that.


He took money from HIS bank account, that showed up on the banks ledgers as HIS, yes. If it's on the banks books as being HIS, and it's in HIS account, what reason would you or he have to think it's not... his?
 
2014-03-28 07:09:45 PM  

fredklein: MycroftHolmes: fredklein: DROxINxTHExWIND: IF ITS NOT YOUR PROPERTY DO NOT TAKE IT.

That's the whole point- he didn't "TAKE" it, they GAVE it to him. He didn't commit fraud to get they money in his account- THEY, of their own free will, put it there.

You are saying that he did not take money that he knew did not belong to him and spend it?  There is literally nothing that supports this theory.

I'll say it again: He did not "TAKE" the money. They GAVE it to him. It's spelled out clearly in the article: "...a teller entered the amount into [his] account...". He did not cause this to happen.


This has happened many times before. The bank didn't "give" it to him. They unwittingly/accidentally deposited it into his account.

Spending money that isn't yours is illegal. That's like taking somebody else's Ferrari that's parked in your parking lot. Just because you own the parking lot doesn't mean you have free reign on anything that passes through it.

This is a very clear case of grand theft. Sure, the bank is retarded for putting it into the wrong account. Now they have to chase down some loser to get their money back.
 
2014-03-28 07:24:55 PM  

armor helix: The bank didn't "give" it to him. They unwittingly/accidentally deposited it into his account.


Um... you just contradicted yourself.

They put it in HIS account, thus giving it to him. Accidentally or no.
 
2014-03-28 07:29:50 PM  

DROxINxTHExWIND: JesusJuice: fark the bank. Their mistake, they should eat it. It's not like the bastards can't afford it.


Ever lost your car keys? Should the person who finds them be able to take ownership of your car?


If you take your car to someone's car lot and give them the keys and the title. Don't be surprised when it is sold.
 
2014-03-28 07:35:52 PM  

netcentric: MelGoesOnTour: DROxINxTHExWIND: JesusJuice: fark the bank. Their mistake, they should eat it. It's not like the bastards can't afford it.


Ever lost your car keys? Should the person who finds them be able to take ownership of your car?

Good point. I'm kind of on the fence with this, though. I was once in a situation where my bank accidentally took money out of my account. They put it back but it took almost a week. I will admit that they didn't let anything bounce but, still, it was a major hassle for me. In this kids case, I say the bank should eat it because it took so long to be discovered (plus it was an actual bank error). They can make up the money from the fee;s they charge for everything.

I like your thought process.

If you are at my house and you lay your cell phone down. Or your purse or IPad whatever ...   I can take it and keep it.     You put it in my posession, thus it is mine.

Or you leave your coat in my restaraunt.   When you come back for it,  I keep it.   It is mine.
You park your car on my property inadvertantly, while taking your daughter to look at some ducks by the stream.     I take it and keep it.   You put it in my possession.   It is mine.

Awesome system.


Calm down, you're forgetting there's the bank in the middle. Person A gives them money and asks for it to be put in Person A's own account, and instead the teller put it in person B's account. As far as I can see, Person A hasn't had the 'accident', it's the bank, which is performing a service of depositing the money in the correct account (I went back to the article, it was a teller mistake).

Person B's not being very smart (although if he somehow gets away with a slap on the wrist after going "oops it's all gone", he'd be pretty lucky), but I can't escape that the bank is still the responsible party in all this for getting the transaction wrong - there should never be talk of a transaction between Person A and Person B, because the transactions are Person A to bank, and bank to Person B. The latter is the problem.
 
2014-03-28 07:46:51 PM  
It sounds like the he and the bank are already taking steps to resolve the issue. They gave a deadline of the 19th, and it's well past that with no criminal charges as of this point.

My guess is that he truly thought it was inheritance, and only realized his error when he tried to look for the inheritance papers. He probably bought a car with the cash that he had been waiting for to come through.

Well, hopefully, that's how it happened. It might not have, but they seem to already be in talks about it. Chalk it up to a mistake on both sides and negotiate about how to fix it in a way that leaves both relatively unscathed.
 
2014-03-28 07:57:01 PM  

DROxINxTHExWIND: LemSkroob: DROxINxTHExWIND: JesusJuice: fark the bank. Their mistake, they should eat it. It's not like the bastards can't afford it.


Ever lost your car keys? Should the person who finds them be able to take ownership of your car?

There is a difference between finding car keys laying on the ground, and someone walking up to you in the street, shoving the keys in your pocket, and then walking away.


Settle down with the adjectives. Someone in a bank pressed the wrong button. You dropped your keys fishing in your pockets for something else. Both are mistakes. Don't allow your hatred for banks and bankers compromise your sense of right and wrong. I get it. We all want to stick it to the bankers becausse they did it to us. If you have no problem using them being evil as a justification to steal moenty that doesn't belong to you then cool, just say it. but, lets not act like its not theft.


Where did this idea "stealing" and "theft" came from? It's not like the kid robbed the bank teller and now he has to pay back his spoils. The kid spent money that he honestly thought was his due to an error on the bank's part, and now the kid has to pay back a back-breaking amount of money due to an honest mistake of both parties. Who is the victim here?
 
2014-03-28 08:02:33 PM  

Fallout Boy: DROxINxTHExWIND: LemSkroob: DROxINxTHExWIND: JesusJuice: fark the bank. Their mistake, they should eat it. It's not like the bastards can't afford it.


Ever lost your car keys? Should the person who finds them be able to take ownership of your car?

There is a difference between finding car keys laying on the ground, and someone walking up to you in the street, shoving the keys in your pocket, and then walking away.


Settle down with the adjectives. Someone in a bank pressed the wrong button. You dropped your keys fishing in your pockets for something else. Both are mistakes. Don't allow your hatred for banks and bankers compromise your sense of right and wrong. I get it. We all want to stick it to the bankers becausse they did it to us. If you have no problem using them being evil as a justification to steal moenty that doesn't belong to you then cool, just say it. but, lets not act like its not theft.

Where did this idea "stealing" and "theft" came from? It's not like the kid robbed the bank teller and now he has to pay back his spoils. The kid spent money that he honestly thought was his due to an error on the bank's part, and now the kid has to pay back a back-breaking amount of money due to an honest mistake of both parties. Who is the victim here?


It's theft. This has happened many times before. Unless the kid comes up with the money he is going to jail, just like every other imbecile that has done the same thing.

Learn the law. And lookup what "stealing" means.
 
2014-03-28 08:19:49 PM  
img.fark.net

Well that clears that up.
 
2014-03-28 08:20:18 PM  
 
2014-03-28 08:24:40 PM  

LemSkroob: Mentalpatient87: I agree for the most park with "fark the banks," but you've got to be some kind of idiot to think spending a dime of that money would play out well.

Take the $31,000, put it into a interest bearing account/fund/market. wait till last possible day they give you till they go to prosecute you, then give them back $31,000. Keep the interest.


This.

It actually happened a lot in the military, so much so that they had briefings to warn people about it(signing and re-enlist bonuses and such were processed badly).  Tossing it into a savings account was a helpful hint to make something out of it since you're only liable for the exact amount.

Some guy I know, homeschooled of course, blew it on a motorcycle(despite ample warnings from everyone around), dropped the farker when walking it somewhere bent some things and scratched the shiat out of it.  Ended up selling it for like 1/3 of what he paid about a week after he was called out on taking the money, and had his wages severely garnished.
 
2014-03-28 08:31:03 PM  

R.A.Danny: whidbey: JesusJuice: There's nothing intrinsically wrong with stealing, it just depends on who you're stealing from. I can't think of any reason it should be wrong to steal from a bank. They've stolen plenty from us, and turnabout is fair play.

[s30.postimg.org image 375x236]

Yup.


God forbid anyone should contradict your naive and pedestrian sense of morality.
 
2014-03-28 08:31:29 PM  

MycroftHolmes: RockofAges: MycroftHolmes: RockofAges: or it to be theft, whom is he stealing it from? Certainly not from any individual account holder. Therefor, "the bank"?

I find it so interesting that people are fine with a power arrangement in which the powerful are allowed to hold absolute moral authority, set the rules, AND disperse ALL responsibility to the four winds.

BUT

When Johnny Six-Pack collects a bank error in his favour -- that's a paddlin?

Stand on your theory books and scream to the heavens about those hellish 18 year old "thieves" out spending a pittance (to a bank) on magic cards. It's really impressive.

Let me make sure I understand this.  You feel that since banks and the organizations behnd them have money and therefore power, and power defines the rules, you think it is morally acceptable for a person lacking in power to defy those rules because...well, I'll be honest with you, this is where I stop being able to follow you.  Why, exactly, shouldn't it be considered theft?  Your post did have a string of words that seemed to be related to each other in some manner, but I will be danged if I could eke out a logical argument from them.

Okay Mr. Data, let me spell something out for you in human terms. The rules are arbitrary and do not always denote a reference to any direct harm. Show me a victim directly impugned by this faulty deposit, not some caricature, and you'll find my point in the same territory.

If I understand correctly, you are saying that if a harm occurs to a conglomeration such that the harm can be distributed across and not felt by any one member, then no harm occurred?

Or you are saying that banks, as entities, cannot be harmed because...well, again, I can't follow your logic here.


It's the same mentality that justifies shoplifting and theft of public property. It's an example of selfishness and a complete lack of ethics.
 
2014-03-28 08:35:18 PM  

fredklein: MycroftHolmes: fredklein: DROxINxTHExWIND: JesusJuice: fark the bank. Their mistake, they should eat it. It's not like the bastards can't afford it.


Ever lost your car keys? Should the person who finds them be able to take ownership of your car?

Ever park your car in someone else's garage and hand them the keys, saying "this is yours now"?

That's more like what the bank did. They parked/deposited the car/money in his garage/account. The money was controlled by HIS keys/bank card and pin, and the statement he gets showing his available balance showed the money was his.

If you know for a fact that they are wrong and that the car is not yours, you are committing theft if you take that car and treat it as if you own this.

It is not illegal to receive money, even from an unknown source. Thus, there is no way to "know for a fact" that the money in MY account, isn't mine. In fact, the fact that is in MY account tends to indicate the opposite- that it is, indeed, mine.

If someone delivers something to my house by mistake, it is not mine.

Wrong.

https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0181-unordered-merchandise

Q. Am I obligated to return or pay for merchandise I never ordered?

A. No. If you receive merchandise that you didn't order, you have a legal right to keep it as a free gift.

Now, to be fair, it also says:

Q. What should I do if the unordered merchandise I received was the result of an honest shipping error?

A. Write the seller and offer to return the merchandise, provided the seller pays for postage and handling. Give the seller a specific and reasonable amount of time (say 30 days) to pick up the merchandise or arrange to have it returned at no expense to you. Tell the seller that you reserve the right to keep the merchandise or dispose of it after the specified time has passed.

I think, in this day and age of computers and instant world-wide communication, that 30 days is too long.

Are you saying that just because someone made a mistake, even though you know the goods are not yours, it is not theft to keep them?

I'm saying that if someone GIVES you something, it's yours.  If you believe otherwise, then you think Uncle Joe who gave you that neato Christmas present last year, can just swing by and take it back.


If someone gives you a laptop that turns out to be stolen, you can still be charged with reception or posession of stolen property.
 
2014-03-28 08:36:24 PM  

Mordis: If the valet gives you the wrong black Toyota Camry and you drive away, are you charged with auto theft?


If you realize it isn't yours and decide to keep it anyway then yes.
 
2014-03-28 08:42:40 PM  

RockofAges: Rozotorical: DROxINxTHExWIND: JesusJuice: fark the bank. Their mistake, they should eat it. It's not like the bastards can't afford it.


Ever lost your car keys? Should the person who finds them be able to take ownership of your car?

If you take your car to someone's car lot and give them the keys and the title. Don't be surprised when it is sold.

Someone chipped off about 1/100th of a Golden Parachute (tm) and tried to send the nugget down the line, maybe?


Someone has some serious jealousy/class envy.

Just because someone gets away with immoral bullshiat doesn't mean it's ok to stoop to their level. Nobody should get away with that crap.
 
2014-03-28 08:52:06 PM  

Delawheredad: For the so many willfully ignorant on this thread. The wikipedia definition of Uttering.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uttering

The kid is looking a felony charges. Still think he did nothing wrong?

Some of you folks are denser than Neutronium!.


B....b....b...b...b...but my opinion!!!!!!
 
2014-03-28 08:53:43 PM  

Mordis: If the valet gives you the wrong black Toyota Camry and you drive away, are you charged with auto theft?


yes
 
2014-03-28 08:58:27 PM  
Had the same thing happen to me.  Bank deposited $11,000 into my checking account.  Noticed it in the evening and called them first thing in the morning to get it all straightened out.


When you steal $11 you can just disappear. When you steal $11,000 they will find you, unless they think you're already dead.
 
2014-03-28 09:21:29 PM  

James10952001: If someone gives you a laptop that turns out to be stolen, you can still be charged with reception or posession of stolen property.


http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Receiving+Stolen+Proper t y
"The offense of acquiring goods with the knowledge that they have been stolen, extorted, embezzled, or unlawfully taken in any manner."

If you don't KNOW it's stolen, you can take it.

Basically, it breaks down to "PROVE he KNEW it was not his". And, unless you can read his mind, you CANNOT prove what he actually thought.
 
2014-03-28 09:38:34 PM  

fredklein: James10952001: If someone gives you a laptop that turns out to be stolen, you can still be charged with reception or posession of stolen property.

http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Receiving+Stolen+Proper t y
"The offense of acquiring goods with the knowledge that they have been stolen, extorted, embezzled, or unlawfully taken in any manner."

If you don't KNOW it's stolen, you can take it.

Basically, it breaks down to "PROVE he KNEW it was not his". And, unless you can read his mind, you CANNOT prove what he actually thought.


As the saying goes, posession is 9/10ths of the law. If you bought a $1500 computer for $250, that can be considered knowing it was stolen. Even if you aren't charged with posession, you still have to give it back once you are made aware that it is stolen property.
 
2014-03-28 09:38:50 PM  
Banks don't fall for the whole "Money? what money?" bit ether.
 
2014-03-28 09:40:03 PM  

Fallout Boy: The kid spent money that he honestly thought was his due to an error on the bank's part,


There's no honest way to have money due to a bank's error.
 
2014-03-28 09:49:04 PM  
The bank DID let him withdraw funds... Personally, my opinion is the bank should withdraw as much as they can from his account, up to the 31k (I'm guessing zeroing it out), and chalk the rest to a loss. Then, don't fark up next time.

The kid was unscrupulous. The bank was stupid for not carefully verifying the identity/account of a depositor trying to put 31k in the bank.
 
2014-03-28 10:38:48 PM  
Meh, I've been working for 25 years and have no doubt i'll be working for 25 more.  If I see money available in my bank account I think I should have the right to use it (unless notified prior that a mistake was made, please don't use that money).  If it's gone, it's gone baby.

/Won't someone please think about the poor banks?
 
2014-03-28 11:04:49 PM  

Phelon Hardtimes: Meh, I've been working for 25 years and have no doubt i'll be working for 25 more.  If I see money available in my bank account I think I should have the right to use it (unless notified prior that a mistake was made, please don't use that money).  If it's gone, it's gone baby.

/Won't someone please think about the poor banks?


So you're perfectly ok with stealing something that someone forgot to lock up just because that someone is a bank that has more money than you do. Either way, your ideal of how things should work has no bearing on how they do work.

Personally if I didn't earn it or it wasn't deliberately given to me, then it isn't mine. I guess honesty is harder to come by these days.
 
2014-03-28 11:08:17 PM  
He's been arrested.

The charge is "theft by taking".
 
2014-03-28 11:22:39 PM  
There's nothing intrinsically wrong with stealing, it just depends on who you're stealing from. I can't think of any reason it should be wrong to steal from a bank. They've stolen plenty from us, and turnabout is fair play.


Wisdom is seldom seen here. The rest of you with your petty kindergarten ethical arguments are a sad lot.
 
2014-03-28 11:47:19 PM  

James10952001: If you bought a $1500 computer for $250, that can be considered knowing it was stolen


Really? Why? That's, what, a 80% discount?? I see stuff like that all the time.

0.tqn.com

www.usadiscounters.net

fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net

Are they all selling stolen items?
 
2014-03-28 11:49:36 PM  

JesusJuice: R.A.Danny: whidbey: JesusJuice: There's nothing intrinsically wrong with stealing, it just depends on who you're stealing from. I can't think of any reason it should be wrong to steal from a bank. They've stolen plenty from us, and turnabout is fair play.

[s30.postimg.org image 375x236]

Yup.

God forbid anyone should contradict your naive and pedestrian sense of morality.


I'm quite happy being honest.
 
2014-03-29 12:04:37 AM  
So you go to your local bank branch, for whatever in person transaction you are doing, and as you enter there are two armed security guards walking out with large chained and locked canvas bags in their hands.  You notice the armored truck pulled up to the curbside they are headed to.  Normally you are a real renegade, a rebel, a lone wolf thumbing your nose at the man, but today, you actually hold the door open for them as they exit.  You proceed to walk into the bank when your foot kicks some object on the floor you weren't expecting.  You look down to see a banded stack of $100 bills ($10,000).  What do?  How do you know it wasn't a tip for holding the doors for the security guards?
 
2014-03-29 12:35:23 AM  

trappedspirit: Fallout Boy: The kid spent money that he honestly thought was his due to an error on the bank's part,

There's no honest way to have money due to a bank's error.


He thought it was his inheritance, not a bank error.
 
2014-03-29 12:49:49 AM  

Fallout Boy: trappedspirit: Fallout Boy: The kid spent money that he honestly thought was his due to an error on the bank's part,

There's no honest way to have money due to a bank's error.

He thought it was his inheritance, not a bank error.


And I thought it was money from one of those emails from Nigeria I answered.  Prove I didn't think that. LOL #freemoney
 
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