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(The Nation)   A while back we sent California thousands of Okies. Now they seem to be returning the favor with thousands of earthquakes. Thanks for that   (thenation.com) divider line 11
    More: Scary, party favors, burden of proof, earthquakes, U.S. Geological Survey  
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4187 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Mar 2014 at 2:43 PM (25 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-27 04:31:36 PM
3 votes:
Here's a different oil zone, the Mississippi Lime that is fracked too.
Again, the little black skiers are the symbols for the recent earthquakes as reported by the Oklahoma folks.

There IS some coincidence. I'll let others decide how closely this works to the wells and the quakes.

i.imgur.com
2014-03-27 02:48:00 PM
2 votes:
From the Oklahoma Geological Survey, here's an interesting chart I made:

Year    Number of quakes
2003    48
2004    66
2005    22
2006    22
2007    30
2008    25
2009    51
2010    1062
2011    1471
2012    981
2013    2848
2014    1133 as of March 27

Gee, I wonder if it correlates with the number of drilling permits issued... I haven't yet found a database with an annual breakdown of permits over the years, though.
2014-03-27 01:55:47 PM
2 votes:
Oklahoma has wee little earthquakes that you can't feel unless you are right up close. I'm more concerned with all the Californian moving back.
2014-03-27 04:07:41 PM
1 votes:
Here's a map of the wells in the Woodford Shale, most likely to be fracked in Oklahoma.
The little black skier marks on the maps are the recent swarm of earthquakes in Oklahoma, per the link upthread

If you can connect the swarm to the Woodford wells, you're not being honest.
Once you remove the areas just around the Woodford fracked wells from the equation, you're limited to explain how so many earthquakes happened.

That said, I know there are other zones that are fracked in Oklahoma. Such as the Mississippi Lime. I don't have a map as to where they are.
But the sheer volume of Woodford wells mostly likely considerably outnumbers the other recently fracked wells in the state.

This is NOT to say drilling and water well injection aren't the cause, because there's most likely some oil and gas activity near where the earthquake swarms are.
But most likely, it's not a fracking thing.  And water disposal from fracking is usually done within ten miles of the wells.

i.imgur.com
2014-03-27 03:31:23 PM
1 votes:

Walker: I'm not saying it's due to fracking....but it's due to fracking.


Shhh, fracking is totally safe!  Just don't drink your tap water or use it for bathing.  Well, just don't use it.
2014-03-27 02:55:01 PM
1 votes:
Fracking
2014-03-27 02:54:21 PM
1 votes:
Well, here's the silver lining. If there's an earthquake, relief organizations will ship in bottled water, which residents will need because fracking farked up their drinking water supply.

/pollyanna
2014-03-27 02:52:31 PM
1 votes:
As a geologist what I find fascinating is that it's limited to a small area in Oklahoma.  Other jurisdictions where wastewater wells and fracking occur don't have a commensurate increase in quakes like Oklahoma.  I'd be interested to find out if Oklahoma allows more aggressive injection or fracking or if there's an underlying geological explanation.
2014-03-27 02:52:27 PM
1 votes:
It couldn't be realted to fracking........   naaa      'course not!
2014-03-27 02:51:32 PM
1 votes:
Corvus:Well at least those until those smaller ones put enough pressure on a fault line to cause a big one.
Earthquakes generally do the opposite - they're how fault lines relieve stress.

In this case the fault lines are very small; they're fractures used in hydraulic fracturing.  Injecting high pressure liquids into fractures makes them more likely to break, i.e. slide past each other, which is how faults create earthquakes.  But it's very unlikely that you'll get big ones out of it.
2014-03-27 02:50:24 PM
1 votes:

SansNeural: From the Oklahoma Geological Survey, here's an interesting chart I made:

Year    Number of quakes
2003    48
2004    66
2005    22
2006    22
2007    30
2008    25
2009    51
2010    1062
2011    1471
2012    981
2013    2848
2014    1133 as of March 27

Gee, I wonder if it correlates with the number of drilling permits issued... I haven't yet found a database with an annual breakdown of permits over the years, though.


Waste injection wells.
http://stateimpact.npr.org/oklahoma/tag/earthquakes/
 
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